Washington College Poets Win Two Major National Poetry Awards

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A second-year English faculty member and an alumna who is now assistant director at the Rose O’Neill Literary House each have earned two top national literary awards in poetry. Kimberly Quiogue Andrews, assistant professor of English and creative writing, has won the 2018 Akron Poetry Prize for her first full-length collection,A Brief History of Fruit, while Lindsay Lusby ’08 has won the 2018 Agha Shahid Ali Prize, awarded by the University of Utah Press, for her first full-length collection, Catechesis: a postpastoral.

“It is a testament to the talented writing community fostered here at Washington College that we can celebrate not one but two incredible poetic achievements,” says James Allen Hall, director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House, associate professor of English, and award-winning poet and essayist. “Each of these prizes—the Akron Prize and the Agha Shahid Ali Prize—are nationally competitive prizes with presses that make beautiful and award-winning books. One of Akron’s books was a finalist for the National Book Award in poetry last year, for instance. I feel honored to work with both of these poets and thrilled that poetry is thriving at Washington College.”

In its announcement of the 2018 Akron Prize, the University of Akron Press describes A Brief History of Fruitas shuttling “between the United States and the Philippines in the search for a sense of geographical and racial belonging. Driven by a restless need to interrogate the familial, environmental, and political forces that shape the self, these poems are both sensual and cerebral … Colonization, class dynamics, an abiding loneliness, and a place’s titular fruit—tiny Filipino limes, the frozen berries of rural America—all serve as focal markers in a book that insists that we hold life’s whole fragrant pollination in our hands and look directly at it, bruises and all.”

Kimberly Quiogue Andrews and Lindsay Lusby

This year’s judge, Diane Suess, selected Quiogue Andrews’s collection from 687 entries, calling it a “superb collection” that “offers up history—personal, familial, post-colonial, geo-political, ecological—and indeed the history of fruit, fruit as sustenance, pleasure, exploitable product, as image, parent, love, and wound… The formal variety is remarkable without calling too much attention to itself . . . the experiments arise organically from each poem’s purpose and particular emotional hue.”

Quiogue Andrews’s BETWEEN won the 2017 New Women’s Voices Prize from Finishing Line Press, and she is a two-time Academy of American Poets prize winner and a Pushcart nominee. Her poems have appeared in Poetry Northwest, Grist, West Branch, Nat. Brut, The Shallow Ends, and Tinderbox Poetry Journal, among others. Her essays and criticism have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, ASAP/J, and elsewhere.

Kimiko Hahn selected Lusby’s Catechesis: a postpastoral, and the University of Utah will publish the book in June 2019. Lusby is invited to read as part of the University of Utah’s Guest Writers Series from the Department of English.

In Catechesis: a postpastoral , Lusby poses the question: If Clarice Starling and Ellen Ripley could warn the girls and women to follow, what would they tell us? The work combines Grimm fairy tale with understated horror movie and the Book of Revelation to construct a vision of the lush green dangers and apocalyptic transformations inherent in girlhood. This lyric lore, which includes strange diagrams and collages of the botanical and the anatomical, contains hidden instruction to prepare girls for the hazards ahead. The manuscript was a finalist for the 2018 Dorset Prize at Tupelo Press and a semi-finalist for the 2018 Brittingham & Felix Pollak Prizes at the University of Wisconsin Press.

Catechsis by Lindsay Lusby is a daring and true debut collection,” said Kimiko Hahn in judging the award.

Lusby, assistant editor for the Literary House Press and managing editor for Cherry Treeis also the author of two chapbooks, Blackbird Whitetail Redhand (Porkbelly Press, 2018) and Imago (dancing girl press, 2014), and the winner of the 2015 Fairy Tale Review Poetry Contest. Her poems have appeared most recently in Passages NorthThe Account, North Dakota QuarterlyTinderbox Poetry JournalFairy Tale Review, and elsewhere. Her visual poems have appeared in Dream Pop Press and Duende.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Animal Crackers – A Laugh Riot at the Garfield

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Horatius Jamison, secretary, and Captain Spaulding, the African explorer, with Hives the butler and Mrs. Rittenhouse, the hostess. Landskroener is picture-perfect as Groucho Marx, voice, mustache and all.  (Ian Ellison, Jim Landskoener, Brad Chaires, Diane Landskroener)     Photo by Jane Jewell

Fans of the Marx Brothers–and of vintage comedy in general–have a treat waiting for them at the Garfield Center. The musical version of Animal Crackers – directed by Jennifer Kafka Smith – is one of the funniest shows to appear on the local stage in recent memory.

Animal Crackers began as a 1928 Broadway musical with a book by George S. Kaufmann and Morrie Ryskind, starring the Marx Brothers and Margaret Dumont, Groucho’s long-time comic foil. It was the brothers’ second Broadway hit, running for 191 performances. It was also the brothers’ last stage show since the advent of talking pictures made it possible to transfer their fast-talking brand of comedy to film. The play has been revived several times, starting in 1982, with various changes – notably the substitution of some better-known songs for those in the original musical and the removal of material that today’s audiences are likely to find objectionable. The Garfield’s production is based on a 2009 version produced at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago.

The musical became the Marx Brothers’ second film in 1930, with most of the principals from the stage show reprising their roles. Lilian Roth took the role of Arabella, the romantic lead. The movie, which is probably the best-known version of the show, was shot in Astoria, New York, where Paramount Pictures had an East Coast studio. And with the film censorship of the Hayes Code still four years in the future, the film was much racier than later Hollywood productions – giving the Marx Brothers a chance to show off their zany brand of humor, including a fair quota of double-entendres. And while several characters and some subplots from the stage version were cut, the movie retained many of the best tunes from the stage show, including “Hooray for Captain Spaulding,” which later became Groucho Marx’s TV theme song.   And in case you were wondering, “schnorrer” is a Yiddish word meaning moocher or con artist.

The cast of Animal Crackers in a dance choreographed by Kimberly Stevens.    Photo by Jane Jewell

The plot involves a large party given by Mrs. Rittenhouse, a Long Island society matron. The party features the appearance of Captain Spalding, an African explorer and international celebrity, and the first American exhibition of a famous French painting. Mrs. Rittenhouse is anxious for her daughter, Arabella, to meet a suitable husband. She also wants to reestablish her place in society, which has been eroding since the death of her husband. Guests arrive, including a rich New York businessman, Roscoe W. Chandler, and Mrs. Whitehead, a social rival.

At last Captain Spalding (Groucho’s character) arrives, followed by an Italian musician, Ravelli (Chico’s character) and the Professor (Harpo). And much hilarity ensues, including chases, wisecracks, slapstick, double-talk, puns, songs and dances – and oh yes, a couple of love stories and a plot to steal the painting. None of it makes much sense – really, did you expect it to? – and this production makes no attempt to tie it all together. It’s just one heck of a lot of fun.  Enjoy the ride and forget about the destination.

Capt. Spaulding and Ravelli examine the forged painting as the two lovers look on, Photo by Jane Jewell

With so little story, the play depends heavily on the casting, and the local theater community has risen to the occasion. Jim Landskroener takes the role of Captain Spalding, complete with a painted-on Groucho mustache, and he gives a brilliant performance. Whether he’s reeling off a string of nonsense, mugging at the audience, dancing, or delivering a patter song, he’s a thoroughly believable Groucho, right down to the accent. This role is the key to the whole production, and it’s right on target.

Kirby Powell is hilarious as the Professor, the Harpo Marx character. It’s a role that calls for a wide repertory of physical schtick, and Powell does it with verve – all without saying a single word.   In grand Harpo style, the Professor toots his little hand-held, squeeze-bulb horn and chases women up and down stairs.  And it wouldn’t be Harpo if he didn’t play the harp at least once.  This performance really has to be seen to be believed.

The Marx Brothers live at the Garfield!     Photo by Jane Jewell

Ravelli, the con man/musician of the play, is played by Zac Ryan. His character, originally played by Chico Marx, is a variation on an age-old comic theme, the conniving servant who lives by his wits. Ryan does a great job with the character, including the Italian accent and the physical schtick for some of his bits with the Professor. Very nicely done.

Diane Landskroener, a fine comic actress in her own right, has a juicy role as Mrs. Rittenhouse. A stereotypical social climber, this character gives the actress plenty of opportunity to mock the upper classes and their pretensions. And as a foil to Groucho’s absurdities, Mrs. Rittenhouse has a full platter of double-takes, sputtering outrage, and shocked decorum to deploy – and Landskroener does it all in fine style.

Another key role is Hives, the butler – well played by Brad Chaires, who deploys a formidable deadpan while trying to preserve decorum and delivering straight lines. And when he steps out of the role, it’s even funnier. A good bit of casting!

There are two romantic subplots, featuring Dan Guidice and Gretchen Sachse, and Natalie Lane and Bee Betley. The young lovers get to deliver some of the better songs in the show, including “Three Little Words” (Lane and Betley) and “Watching the Clouds Go By” (Guidice and Sachse).  All four have good voices that are showcased nicely by their duets and ensemble numbers.

Betley plays Wally Winston, the intrepid reporter cum gossip columnist who wants to get the scoop on the various celebrities and big-wigs at the party, with an eye to getting a raise and a promotion.  He teams up with Arabella (Natalie Lane), Mrs. Rittenhouse’s flapper daughter who is looking both for a fiancé and a way to raise her family’s social profile.  Wally, handsome and charming, is the perfect candidate for both!  Unfortunately, one of the scandalous tidbits about the various famous guests that she whispers to Wally instead of earning him a bonus puts his job in jeopardy.  But it seems that this romance of opportunity might even survive poverty and obscurity.

On the other hand, true love is the name of the game for Wally’s photographer colleague, Mary Stewart, played by Gretchen Saches.  She is secretly engaged to the struggling artist John Parker played by Dan Guidice.  Together they plot to substitute his painting for the famous painting on display at the party.  Of course, their plot goes astray in the most hilarious way.

The cast of Animal Crackers at the Garfield.      Photo by Jane Jewell

Mike Heffron is convincing as millionaire Roscoe Chandler, and Julie Lawrence displays a nice French accent as Madame Doucet, an art impresario. Mallory Westlund does a good job as Mrs. Whitehead, Mrs. Rittenhouse’s social rival, conniving convincingly with Grace (Brianna Johnson) to bring down Mrs. Rittenhouse. And Ian Ellison, as Horatius Jamison, Spaulding’s secretary, is one of the few characters who manages to fluster Groucho – in a role originally played by Zeppo Marx.

M.G. Brosius, Brooke Ezzo, and Robin Wood contribute solidly, singing and dancing in the ensemble and doing the occasional bit of stage business without a hitch.

Barbi Bedell outdoes herself with the costumes for this production – all period-perfect and all visually stunning. Likewise, the set, designed by Kafka Smith and built by Jim Landskroener, is both striking and functional. The grand double staircase completes the image of a mansion and the provides a perfect setting both for chase scenes and ensemble song and dance numbers.  Michelle Sensenig provides flawless piano accompaniment–with some help from Chico Marx. A couple of the singers/actors were hard to hear, even from the front of the auditorium; and there were occasional pitch problems with a few of the musical numbers but these problems do not spoil the overall performance.

Choreographer Kimberly Stevens deserves special mention for the energetic dance scenes in which the entire ensemble stepped and twirled in the Charleston and other authentic dances of the era.

The social-climbing Mrs. Rittenhouse (Diane Landskroener) greets her rivals Mrs. Whitehead (Mallory Westlund ) and Grace Carpenter (Brianna Johnson). Photo by Jane Jewell

Kafka Smith said she has been a Marx Brothers fan for as long as she can remember, with Animal Crackers a particular favorite. It shows in this production — everyone involved is obviously having fun, and the fun is contagious. She studied old Marx brothers films in order to flawlessly reproduce the various signature bits of “business” that the Marx brothers were known for.  You will love the bit with the cardboard table.

The show would be a good introduction to the theater for young playgoers; the raunchier bits of the movie version have been edited out, while the antics are fully intact – if anything, they’re funnier seen live on stage. This really is one of the funniest shows you’re likely to see any time soon, a laugh riot from start to finish.  Both kids and adults will love the slapstick while older teens and adults will appreciate the outrageous puns and the not-so-subtle mockery of social pretensions.  This show is hilarious. Go see it!

Animal Crackers runs through Sept. 30, with performances at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and Sunday matinees at 3 p.m. Tickets are $20 for general admission; $15 for seniors and military personnel; and $10 for students. For reservations, call 410-810-2060 or visit www.garfieldcenter.org.

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Church Hill Theatre “Hitched” — A Play by Earl Lewin

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Let the Party Begin! The cast of playwright Earl Lewin’s “Hitched” – Front row – Amy Moredock, Howard Mesick, Jane Jewell, Christine Kinlock, Chris, Rogers, Back row – Charles Moore, Peggy Chiras, Steve Hazzard      Photo by Peter Heck

BC Productions proudly announces the premiere of Hitched, the latest script by Chestertown playwright Earl Lewin. “Hitched” is a slang term for getting married. The dictionary defines it as “loosely tied.” This is a family’s tale of pulling formality and informality into one uncomfortable knot. 

Hitched tells what happened when the widely dispersed members of a large family all return home for the “big wedding.”  Now they are all together again for the first time in years and staying in the same house! The mix is a clash of cultures and generations that will have you laughing and crying at the emotional relationships that make this crazy family care about and love one another.

The scene opens in the living room of middle-aged Millie Baker. Millie is 15-years divorced and looking forward to hosting family members at her home in Phoenix for her nephew Jim’s wedding weekend. Blow-up mattresses at the ready, her family (including the unexpected appearance of her ex-husband) convergences on her home and then on her comfort zone. Her brother Harry is several times divorced and living in Philadelphia with his current wife, Penny who is half his age. Jim–Harry’s son with his first wife Linda–is marrying into a socially significant Phoenix family. The wedding is supposed to be a dignified and formal affair. Only maybe not with Uncle Harry and Aunt Rhoda on the loose!

A heart-to-heart talk between mother and son in “Hitched” (Howard Mesick and Peggy Chiras)     Photo by Peter Heck

Among the house guests is Millie’s son Bruce. Millie is unaware that Bruce, a professor at Georgia State University, is gay. Bruce is bringing his partner, Spike, to introduce him to the family. Spike is a civil rights attorney practicing in New York City. Harry’s sophisticated cousin Brenda also lives in New York City. Millie’s outspoken, obnoxious Aunt Rhoda is among the guests. Millie’s ex-husband, now running a mission for orphan boys in New Guinea, shows up uninvited asking Millie to take care of him while he recovers from minor surgery.

Performances of Hitched will be held at Church Hill Theatre over two weekends beginning on Friday, September 28th and running through Sunday, October 7th. Friday and Saturday performances begin at 8 pm, and Sunday matinees begin at 2 pm.

The cast includes Peggy Dixon Chiras as Millie.  Chiras made her on-stage debut in Lewin’s 2015 production of Accidentally Wealthy and more recently starred in the 2016 production of Saint George’s Blues. Steve Hazzard portrays Harry, also appearing in Accidentally Wealthy and Saint George’s Blues. Hazzard first appeared at Church Hill Theatre in How the Other Half Loves and has acted in many roles in Michigan theater productions. Portraying Harry’s wife Penny is Christine Kinlock who appeared in Lewin’s Orlando Rising. Other recent credits include Rowena in Biloxi Blues; Rosalind/Ganymede in Shore Shakespeare’s As You Like It; the title role in Sylvia at The Garfield; and Hermia in Shore Shakespeare’s A  Midsummer Night’s Dream. Chris Rogers plays Millie’s ex-husband Spencer. This performance marks his sixth BC Production. Rogers is a well-known, local actor and co-founder of the Shore Shakespeare Company. He will next appear as Henry Lodge in Move Over, Mrs. Markham with Tred Avon Players in Oxford at the end of October.  

Howard Mesick portrays Millie’s son Bruce. Mesick is both a playwright and a familiar face on local stages playing lead roles with The Garfield, Church Hill Theatre, and Shore Shakespeare Company. Portraying Bruce’s partner Spike is Charles Michael Moore. He has acted in productions of You Can’t Take It With YouYou’re A Good Man Charlie BrownHurlyburly, Fugue In A Nursery, The Importance Of Being Earnest, Wit, Under Milk Wood, Woyzeck, and The Rocky Horror Show. He has also directed shows for both Washington College and Church Hill Theater. Amy Moredock portrays Brenda. Moredock has performed in many BC Productions including The Burgundy Wine Mob and Not Responsible which provided her with NYC experience. Other credits include Church Hill Theatre performances as Regina in The Little Foxes, Maggie in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and Elvira Condomine in Blithe Spirit. Aunt Rhoda is played by Jane Jewell who is well-known to Eastern Shore audiences through her performances with BC Productions, Church Hill Theatre, The Garfield, and Shore Shakespeare’s 2016 summer production of Macbeth. Tom Dorman portrays Grimm. He has played a wide range of impressive roles at Church Hill Theatre and The Garfield. Dorman portrayed the title role in Lewin’s Orlando Rising. Rounding out the cast are Eddie Dorman (cab driver), Troy Strootman (Jim), Maya McGrory (Victoria), and King Kong and Yoda playing themselves. 

Assisting Lewin with the production is an equally experienced and accomplished crew: Kathy Jones (Stage Manager); Lewin (Set Design/Construction); Rogers (Sound Design); Doug Kaufmann (Lighting Design/Operation); Speedy Christopher (Sound Operator); Eddie Dorman, Bruce Smith, Kevin Chiras (Stage Crew).

At the wedding in “Hitched” (Steve Hazzard, Christine Kinlock, Amy Moredock)   Photo by Peter Heck

Lewin, a published playwright, having had two one-act plays published by Baker’s Plays, brings his extensive experience to directing his own script. Church Hill Theatre has a collaborative history with Lewin having provided a venue for Lewin’s original scripts including two musicals She Stoops to Conquer, The Musical and Celluloid both featuring musical scores by Dick Durham. Celluloid played Off-Broadway in 2010. His murder-musical The Burgundy Wine Mob also debuted at CHT to go on to an Off-Off-Broadway production in 2012.  Lewin’s Orlando Rising premiered at Church Hill in 2017, Saint Georges Blues in 2016, Accidentally Wealthy in 2015, and then Visiting Sam in 2014. Hitched marks Lewin’s fifth annual production to be staged at Church Hill Theatre in as many years.  Lewin’s short script entitled Not Responsible was also featured in the Short Play Lab’s MidTown Festival in New York City in 2013.

Please plan to join Lewin and his accomplished cast and crew as they unfold a family tale of love and fear of love, marriage, and alimony! Performances will be held at Church Hill Theatre September 28, 29, and 30 and October 5, 6, and 7 (Friday/Saturday performances at 8 pm and Sunday matinees at 2 pm). For information: call 410.556.6003 or visit the Church Hill Theatre website. All tickets are $15 (cash or check only) and may be picked up prior to the performance at the box office. Reservations are suggested. 

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Chesapeake Film Festival Spotlight: ‘Riverment’ Director Shayla Racquel

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While every year the Chesapeake Film Festival brings to the Mid-Shore the best examples of independent filmmaking, with many of their annual selections going on to be full feature success stories with awards and a broad public audience, some of the really exceptional parts of the festival are devoted to showcasing the work of an entirely new generation of directors.

Independent to the core, creative, and with sometimes the simplest of equipment, like using only a smartphone camera, these young filmmakers can produce the same quality of storytelling in short form as their older, more experienced colleagues can do with full feature films.

Shayla Racquel is one of those new filmmakers, and Riverment is one of those films.

In 2018, Shayla completed Riverment, a short film that discusses intergenerational trauma while comparing and contrasting movements. The film follows the relationship between a grandmother and a granddaughter to highlight how women have been, and will continue to be, at the forefront of all political and social movements.

The Spy sat down with Shayla in College Park last month to talk about her life and film work.

This video is approximately three minutes in length. For more information about the Chesapeake Film Festival please go here 

Kent Island Federation of Arts Hosts an Exhibit of WAF

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The Stillest Hour by Gerry Czajkowski

The Kent Island Federation of Arts will host an exhibit of art of the members of the Working Artists Forum in October.  The theme of the show is “Inside, Beside, and Otherwise”. The KIFA gallery is located at 405 Main Street, Stevensville, MD.  The exhibit will run October 3rd through the 27th. A reception, open to the public, will be held on October 11th, from 5 to 7 PM, and an award for the People’s Choice Award of Recognition will be given at that reception. The phone number at the gallery is 410-643-7424 or email ifo@kifa.us. KIFA gallery hours are: Tuesday 10-1, Wed. through Friday 10-4, and Sat. 10-1.

Meet the Author: Neal Jackson at the BookPlate

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Neal Jackson

Come meet photojournalist Neal Jackson Friday, Sept. 21, at the BookPlate, 112 Cross St., where he will discuss his new book, Market, with Marcie Dunn Ramsey. The talk begins at 6 p.m., and copies of the book will be available for purchase and to be signed by the author.

Public markets occupy a central role in every developed or developing nation in the world. They provide an avenue of economic entrepreneurship for large numbers of people, as the cost of entry is low and the marketing expense is minimal. They are often a critical source of household essentials food, clothing, cleaning supplies, even building materials and hardware. Finally, they provide employment for large numbers of people.

But beyond these economic functions, they perform a social purpose. People connect with their friends, exchange community information and gossip, and pass along political and social messages. At its core, however, it is the vendors who define the markets. Their personalities, interactions, goods, cries to customers and, yes, even the twinkle in their eyes, combine to create a market s atmosphere its soul.

Jackson set out on a worldwide odyssey to capture the personalities of these market vendors in portraiture. Via images taken on site in front of a portable backdrop, the sellers, their goods, and the market’s soul come visually alive. Have a seat and immerse yourself in the faces, clothes, and soul which each of the vendors brings to their particular market.

Jackson is a co-founder of Trauma Training for Journalists, a nonprofit volunteer organization providing safety and first aid training for hazardous environments to freelance journalists around the world. He has taught photojournalism at the International Center of Photography in New York City and around the world in the Foundry Photojournalism Workshop. Before going to law school at Georgetown University, he worked as a print reporter and editor. He served as chief legal officer of NPR from 1996-2008. He lives with his wife, Sandra Willett Jackson, in Queen Anne’s County.

For more information, call the BookPlate at 410-778-4167.

Spy Minute: A Birthday Party for the Academy Art Museum

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There was a full day of birthday activities at the Academy Art Museum on Saturday to celebrate sixty remarkable  years of service to the Mid-Shore. As with the actual mission of the museum to teach and show art, the open house allowed visitors to look at paintings from its permanent collection, participate in community art project to produce a commemorative flag, listen in on a class, or simply chit-chat with friends.

The Spy was there to capture some of the fun.

This video is approximately one minute in length.  For more information about the Academy Art Museum please go here

Academy Art Museum Crafts Show: A Preview with Alison Cooley and Craig Fuller

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For thousands of artists and collectors each year there are a handful of crafts shows throughout the country known for their unique quality, and it is extremely good fate for the Eastern Shore that the Academy Art Museum’s annual crafts show is one of those select few.

With a tough selection process, where only one out of three are chosen to show their work in Easton, the AAM Crafts Show has turned out to be one of the most delightful parts of the busy fall art season for both devotees of American craft but all on the Mid-Shore who appreciate the extraordinary talent it takes to produce these different kinds of work of art.

The Spy sat down with operations director Alison Cooley and Chair Craig Fuller, this year’s chairs, to get a quick debriefing on what to expect when the doors open on October 19th but what will be online here well before then.

This video is approximately two minutes minutes in length. For more information about the Academy Art Museum Craft Show please go here

 

The Fall Season: A Different Kind of Downrigging Presentation

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Every year, the Kent Council Arts Council hands out critically important operational support to Kent County’s numerous arts organizations and artists. That has been their mission since the KCAC was formed and they do a conscientious job with that task.

But the Arts Council also plays a leading role in a few select projects a year where its director takes an active role in helping produce community cultural events that interconnect different forms of expression, from poetry to theatre, to help celebrate the arts in Kent County.

One of those projects is now scheduled in partnership with the Sultana Education Foundation for the 2018 Downrigging weekend. Poet Robert Earl Price will be working with KCAC’s John Schratwieser and Janes Church in Chestertown to present a dramatic interpretation of Price’s work. The Unlading.  The poem,

 acknowledging the historic slave transportation purpose of the same style of ship (ie: the Dutch Man of War, and the clipper ship) as a few of the ships taking part in Downrigging) has now been repurposed into a thirty-minute theatrical production in one of the Eastern Shore’s oldest and grandest African-American churches.

The Spy sat down with John a few weeks ago to talk about this very different kind of Downrigging programming.

This video is approximately three minutes in length. The UNLADING; A Dramatized Poem, written and directed by Robert Earl Price, Commissioned and Produced by the Kent County Arts Council for Sultana Education Foundation’s Downrigging Weekend 2018.

Performances are free and will be held at Janes United Methodist Church, 120 S. Cross Street, Chestertown as follows:

Friday, October 26, 2018 – 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 27, 2018 – 1:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Sunday, October 28, 2018 – 1:30 p.m.