Spy House of the Week: Chester River Landing #4 is a 10

Share

Chester River Landing has only 49 residences in its private community along the Chester River. Residents have access to a range of amenities including the private marina, kayak launch, outdoor swimming pool, piazzas and parks. This two-and a half-story unit has a front façade of brick that is traditionally detailed but the rear elevation is open to the river views with its wrap-around porches on the main and second floors.

The open plan of the main floor is broken by the front door that divides the space into two sitting areas. The boundaries are defined by two columns at each side supporting an exposed beam above. One pair of full height columns defines a sitting area with comfortable seating arranged around the TV. The other pair of half-columns rest on bases that flow into the built-in bookcases below long windows flanking the fireplace. A high paneled wainscot with bright blue walls above, tall windows with transoms and beautiful variated hardwood floors tie the two areas together. The coffered ceilings further enliven the interior architecture.

The open floor plan works very well as the fireplace sitting room is also open to the kitchen and dining area with the same wall and window treatment. The focal point of the kitchen is the paneled stove hood with a mantel that displays colorful ceramics. From the kitchen window the cook can overlook the dining area with its wide windows to the river views and a French door accesses the wrap-around porch overlooking the river to quickly serve al-fresco meals.

The master suite and one guest suite are located on the second floor and another guest suite with two bedrooms connected by a “Jack and Jill” bath are tucked under the roof. The master suite has the same white wainscot with a deep taupe wall above, a fireplace opposite the bed and a cozy sitting area at the rear of the house with a French door to the porch for the perfect spot to sip a nightcap while stargazing.
The third floor is versatile since the elevator makes it accessible. The current owners use one bedroom as an office and the other bedroom as a studio.

I loved the office desk under the rear windows with the long views of the river below for a welcome break from computer work.
An open plan that flows well, sunlight from large windows on all sides, rich architectural detailing, an elevator, two floors of porches overlooking the river, a private deeded boat slip and low maintenance-hard to resist!

For more information about this property, contact Stacy Kendall with Cross Street Realtors at 410-778-3779 or stacy@csrealtors.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

 

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Mid-Shore Habitat: The Whimsical Metal Sculpture of David Dunn

Share

Last night I decorated my Christmas tree with one of my older siblings while we listened to the Vince Guaraldi Trio Christmas album, better known to other  “Peanuts” fans as the soundtrack  to “A Charlie Brown Christmas”. Now that my tree is resplendent with all my beloved ornaments from Christmases past, the floor is bare and in need of presents!

The perfect unique gift for the gardener or art lover on my list would be one of the whimsical sea creature sculptures of local artist David Dunn. David grew up in  DC and spent summers and holidays at his family’s waterfront Bozman home. From an early age, he would take driftwood and other Bay detritus deposited by the high tides and repurpose them into three-dimensional art. The Chesapeake Bay provided an unlimited source of found materials which later inspired his “Sea Creatures” series of metal art.

As the son of a diplomat, David spent his early years in Paris where he was captivated by art and later attended the College of Charleston where he majored in theater. His focus was prop design and fabrication but art still beckoned. As his interest in metal design grew, he decided to do post-graduate work in welding.

This training, his innate design talent, his love of the Chesapeake Bay and his life-long interest in “found” objects culminated in his current series “Kings of the Sea” which is fabricated entirely in metal and painted in bright colors.

His workday begins by looking at life that exists in and around the Bay waters and foraging for items he then repurposes into new life forms.  These items include industrial parts, bike gear mechanisms, clamps, and bolts that in his creative hands are transformed into “sea creatures” and “tool critters”. In one of my favorite critters, the handle of a wrench became the spine, the clamps the teeth and the bolts the eyes. In another delightful critter, a helmet and cutlery were transformed into a turtle. Some critters maintain their metal color while others are brightly painted like the captivating “Sailfish.”

David’s work can be found in private collections both local and national including clients on the Eastern Shore and New York City, Key West, Malibu and Washington DC. Currently his “Octopus King of the Sea” is on exhibit at the Academy of Art in Easton through mid-January.

I firmly believe a daily touch of whimsy is good for the soul. Now that gardens are becoming dormant until spring, one of David’s colorful whimsical creations may be just the antidote to the winter doldrums and the perfect gift for the gardener on your list!

For further inspiration visit David’s website at www.dunninmetal or contact him via email at dunninmetal@gmail.com or call 202-390-1881.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Pavilion Perfection: “Winding Creek”

Share

Recently I wrote an article about the work of the architect Hugh Newell Jacobsen, whose iconic residential design including the famous Green residence in Easton that was a series of linked pavilions. Several years ago the architect Peter Newlin of Chesapeake Architects designed another remarkable house that was a series of detached and linked pavilions.

All great architecture begins with a site and a client’s program for the functions and types of spaces they wish to be incorporated into the design. Newlin’s client purchased a small wooded point of land with a creek around the perimeter. They asked for peace and quiet where they could enjoy the creek views and share the site with the wildlife who also called it home. Like their boat with its functional, snug fitting cabinetry, the client wanted the interior to contain functional cabinetry to minimize furniture for storage.
Newlin’s masterful solution was to create five pavilions, linked together by overlapping their corners, like a string of pearls along the gently sloped ridge. The creek then becomes a design element visible from every pavilion and house and landscape are inseparable. North facing walkways tucked under the deep roof overhangs lead to the “Summerhouse” pavilion with its walls of full height screened panels open to the gentle morning sun and breezes.

I especially admired the massing of the pavilions with the hipped roofs, some with triangular dormer windows and others with shed dormers. I also appreciated that many of the window units had vented windows below the picture window above for natural ventilation and for clearer views of the surrounding woods and water.

I enjoyed the meandering approach to the house on the gravel drive that then became a winding brick path from the guest parking area and the family parking at the detached garage to the main pavilion. The color palette of the pavilions with their deep taupe siding and copper roofs originally treated to accelerate their oxidation blends seamlessly into the surrounding woods as if the pavilions were camouflaged.

The hierarchy of interior spaces ranges from the Guest Wing to the “Summerhouse”. The living area with its free-standing fireplace chimney and its soaring ceiling is the centerpiece of the plan and is open to the dining and kitchen areas with their morning sunlight. The dramatic stair tower goes down to the basement utility areas and up to the master suite above.

The master suite has built-ins that divide the sleeping area from the dressing area lined with a wall of closets. The built-ins also function as a headboard for the bed so the sunlight from the windows opposite the bed can penetrate the dressing area. A wonderful nook with a window seat provides a cozy spot for reading or for contemplating the views of nature from the large window.

The finishes are outstanding from the custom recessed lighting in the coffered ceilings, the beautiful inlaid wood floors and the sleek cabinetry. The recessed lighting between the exposed ceiling joists was designed by Newlin and fabricated by Deep Landing Workshop. The pendant lighting was also designed by Deep Landing Workshop.

A gifted architect, sophisticated client, incredible architecture, stunning interiors, outstanding craftmanship in the construction and the detailing all combined to make this house truly remarkable.

 

For more information about this property, contact Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate Company agents Richard Budden at 410-778-0330 (o), 443-480-1181 (c) or rbudden@easternshoremdre.com, or Mary Carlisle at 410-778-0330 (o), 410-703-3820 (c) or m.carlisle@cbchesapeake.com “Equal Housing Opportunity”.
Architecture by Peter Newlin of Chesapeake Architects, 410-778-4899, peter@chesarch.com, www.chesarch.com. Custom lighting by Deep Landing Workshop, 410-778-4042, www.deeplandingworkshop.com

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Quaker Neck Bungalow Bliss

Share

I can’t resist the charm of cottages, especially bungalows, so this cute cottage surrounded by trees and its proximity to Quaker Neck Landing caught my eye.  The front elevation with its French door flanked by double windows and the wide shed dormer above with four windows, the blue siding and white trim was very charming.  The pitched roof had a lower slope over the front which had originally been a porch.

The interior design was equally appealing with hardwood floors and exposed wood decking and beams at the ceiling that had been painted white to better reflect the light. The former porch had been split into two rooms, once of which was the entry and living room. Comfortable upholstered furnishings, bookcases, a wood stove and a beautiful antique corner cabinet created a cozy space in which to linger.  The other was my favorite room, an even cozier nook with two chairs for reading by the double window and two lovely antique pieces for additional charm.

The kitchen with its “L” shape and peninsula counter was a bright and open space in which to work.  I liked the Owner’s collection of baskets and kitchenware above the upper cabinets, especially the large fish shaped grill rack which was a great piece of sculpture.  Off the kitchen was a mud room under another shed roof and a French door to the side yard with its outdoor shower.

The master bedroom with its light blue walls, pencil post wood bed with a white coverlet and blue & white duvet, pegs on white trim around the walls for hanging hats and baskets Shaker style, created a serene retreat. The matchstick blinds at the window allowed sunlight to filter in during the day. The other bedrooms were tucked under the sloped ceiling of the roof for great interior architecture.  

A cottage loaded with charm and close to Quaker Neck Landing-simply irresistible!

 

For more information about this property, please contact Doug Ashley at Doug Ashley Realtors, LLC, at 410-810-0010 (o), 410-708-0480 (c), or dougashley@dougashleyrealtors.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: An Ornithologist’s “Aerie”

Share

Last month I wrote an article in the Talbot Spy about a “Bee House” built on the grounds of the Inn at Perry Cabin. The “Bee House” provided year-round shelter for the bees that ate pollen and nectar from plants and pollinated flowers from the cutting garden to support the Inn’s restaurant and Spa. The architect Peter Newlin told me about a “bird house” he had designed for an ornithologist so naturally I was intrigued. The ornithologist had purchased a site and built a small one-room cabin as her get-away, nestled in a wooded area with conifers, mature deciduous trees, native plants, a creek and marsh that attracted birds and other wildlife.

Peter’s client asked for a three-story addition so she could better observe the birds since different species seek different heights for feeding or nesting areas. The conifers on the property provided shelter, nest sites, and food for birds who prefer high spaces. The wild grasses and weeds provided cover for ground-nesting birds and their seeds provided abundant food for many other types of birds. Trees that bore fruit in autumn such as dogwoods and berry plants provided food for migratory birds and allowed non-migratory birds to “fatten up” to face the food challenges in winter. The oaks and other trees provided food for jays, titmice, woodpeckers as well as nesting habitats for many other species.

The design challenge was how to join a three-story vertical addition to a one-story  small cabin without overwhelming the cabin’s scale and to insert the addition as carefully as possible for minimum invasion of the wildlife’s habitat.  Peter rose to the challenge with his masterful addition. A path of pavers meandered through the opening beneath the trees from the parking area to the house.  The hipped roof of the original cabin inspired the shed roof of the wrap-around porch whose depth varies around the rectangular footprint to create a variety of spaces inside and out. Breaking the tower massing up by stepping it back as it passed through the roof behind and above the one-story original cabin, recladding the entire house and new roofing met the challenge. Many windows became “outlooks” for endless birdwatching. Old and new were blended seamlessly.

I absolutely loved the space planning. The first floor contained the original cabin that became a guest suite with its own door to the outdoors. The front door under a deep porch opened to a vista of the three-story spiral stair centered on the wood stove beyond.  Then your eye was drawn to the sitting room with posts around the center to delineate the comfortable upholstered seating around the wood stove and floor to ceiling bookcases. Surrounding the sitting area was the dining area and other seating in front of tall windows and French doors to access the outdoor seating under the deep protecting roof overhang. A galley kitchen completed the first floor plan.

I was amazed to learn from Peter that his client had applied seven coats of shoe polish to stain the slab-on-grade concrete floors! After this treatment, the large panel sizes defined by the wide joints in the flooring resembled flagstone and the earthen brown color was so appropriate for this wooded setting. The exposed stained wood decking ceiling, comfortable seating around the wood stove, French doors and tall windows that provided large areas for bird watching created a delightful space.

The bedroom on the middle level also had a stained wood decking ceiling. Wrap-around windows and a French door by the bed accessed a deck for listening to nocturnal birds. A bath and two large closets completed this floor. My favorite room was the third floor whose ceiling was pitched on all four sides to better reflect the sunlight throughout the day. Tall, large windows with vented units below and picture windows above wrapped around each corner.  Between the windows were full height bookcases. A wonderful space for a study but the interior architecture and the “bird’s eye” views of the landscape could be a distraction.

The house design was ahead of its time by incorporating many energy saving features.  The insulated slab-on-grade acts as a heat sink and the spiral stair provides natural ventilation by drawing the cool air off the forest floor and exhausting warm air through a dormer window at the third floor roof.

After visiting the property, I was inspired to rethink my own landscape design to attract more birds who hopefully would visit daily for my delight not to mention for my two cats’ entertainment!

As an architect, it is always a pleasure to feature an outstanding house designed by another architect.  It is no surprise that “Aerie” won a “Citation of Merit” from the Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Here we are almost thirty years later celebrating this unique house.

Architecture by Peter Newlin of Chesapeake Architects,  410-778-4899, peter@chesarch.com, www.chesarch.com.

 

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

The Architecture of Hugh Newell Jacobsen on the Eastern Shore

Share

My second job as an architectural intern was with Gini L. Pettus & Associates in Atlanta. The focus of her practice was interior commercial architecture but we both enjoyed discussing residential architecture and soon discovered our mutual admiration for the work of Hugh Newell Jacobsen.

After I moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004, I was delighted to discover two of his houses from excursions with friends on the water. After visiting the firm’s website, I learned that Jacobsen had designed several houses in Talbot County and his Bachelor of Arts degree was from the University of Maryland. I like to think that on breaks from his studies he made sojourns to the Eastern Shore to enjoy the peaceful pre-Bay Bridge rural architecture and landscape.

What I admire about Jacobsen’s work is how he drew his inspiration from the distinctively American vernacular rural architecture-sheds, smokehouses, detached kitchens and barns. The essence of his iconic style were series of pavilions devoid of ornamentation that evoked Shaker architectural design. His contemporary interpretation of the “telescope” houses of the Eastern Shore, became, in his gifted hands, simple geometric plans with gable roofs and chimneys that rose through the steep roof planes to become sculptural elements. His unique style set him apart from his fellow second-generation Modernists peers.

He also designed houses ranging from Jackie Kennedy Onassis’ home on Martha’s Vineyard to the “1998 Life Dream House,” Life Magazine’s promotion of houses designed by famous architects whose plans were made available to the public.

His son Simon is the Founding Principal of Jacobsen Architecture and explains his firm’s design philosophy as “…our detailing is deliberately sparse and linear in order to enhance the spaces within and without … the site is the dominant factor. The quality of the light upon that particular area of earth is always unique and determines the path the architecture will take.” The firm’s houses on the Eastern Shore embody that design philosophy and my favorite of the Eastern Shore houses is the original Green Residence that as of 2017 has a new owner.

The Greene Residence was built on the Wye East River close to the Chesapeake Bay. The client, a New York advertising executive, retained Hugh Newell Jacobsen in 1971 to design a year-around house. On one of his first visits to the site, the client sprinkled cedar seedlings along the shoreline that have matured into a tall grove to protect the house from the winter storms off the Bay and to frame and shade the exquisite house.

Like the older houses of the Tidewater, the Green house has white walls and steep roofs but the similarity ends there. Unlike historic Tidewater houses, this plan’s massing and functions are organized into pavilions defined by the function within. Some of the pavilions are linked by connections with walls of frameless panes of glass resting on brick sills for a striking solid/void juxtaposition of wall and glass. Other pavilions are slightly shifted from each other with just enough space for construction workers to accomplish their tasks. The lack of exterior soffits, gutters and trim is a careful and deliberate abstraction of traditional detailing.

Many of the pavilions have floor to ceiling glass panes at the main level to create an “outlook” to the landscape and water beyond. Above the large glass panes are two levels of multi-paned transoms. The bottom row is open to the main floor of the pavilion and the upper row becomes windows for the second floor. The lack of interior trim allows the wall and floor planes to seamlessly merge and the steep pitched roofs with dormers creates delightful spaces for the guest suites or the loft for the Owner’s artistic endeavors.

The Green house consists of six pavilions. There are two center pavilions with the front pavilion being the entrance hall and support functions. Behind the entry pavilion a short hall leads to the rear sitting room pavilion that faces the water. The rear corners of this dramatic room are floor to ceiling glass panels and the massive chimney rises through the pitched ceiling. At the front corners, glass walled connections on each side lead to two pavilions that are set on a diagonal to the entry and sitting room pavilions. The kitchen/breakfast and dining room pavilion is on the right and is slightly shifted from the garage pavilion by a solid connection. Off the kitchen pavilion, the long pool reaches out to the water and a fence hides the motor court of the garage pavilion. On the left, another sitting room pavilion and the master suite pavilion complete the composition. Terraces off the sitting rooms offer expansive views of the water.

Two guest suites were located on the second floor. One suite is accessed by a “U” shaped cantilevered stair that floats above the floor of the diagonal sitting room pavilion and the other suite is accessed by a spiral stair in the kitchen pavilion. Since the two suites are separated by the main sitting room pavilion, they have total privacy.

The interiors are white to better reflect the light from the varied sources and the firm’s signature “Eggcrate” bookcases are found in the diagonal sitting room. The Mid-Century Modern furnishings include the leather and polished chrome Le Corbusier sofas and the wood Scandinavian dining room table and chairs. It would be very difficult for this architect to choose a favorite detail but the vista from one of the glass-walled connections through the glass corner of the adjacent pavilion to the water beyond was breathtaking.

The Green Residence is a masterpiece of a gifted architect’s vision of domestic architecture in the early 20th century. The photographs that accompany this article were taken last year and belie the age of this iconic house.

Jacobsen Architecture was founded in 2007 by Hugh and Simon Jacobsen and is the recipient of over 140 awards in architecture, design and interiors. The firm’s work spans from much of the US, Caribbean, Europe, and Asia. Besides many accolades and publications, the firm has been nominated for the AIA’s Gold Medal four times and is longest running recipient of Architectural Digest’s AD100, the magazine’s list of the top 100 design talents internationally. The Jacobsens are currently working on a new book to be published by Rizzoli titled “Jacobsen Architecture: 12 Houses by Hugh and Simon Jacobsen”.

If you are one of the lucky few on the Eastern Shore to own a Jacobsen house, please contact the Spy as we would welcome another opportunity to feature more of these unique American houses.

For further inspiration, visit the firm’s website . Photographs of the Green Residence courtesy of Sean Shananhan Photography, Sean@shanahanphotography.com, 703-582-9462. 

The Spy is pleased to announce that Simon Jacobsen will make a presentation of his firm’s work over the Martin Luther King holiday weekend on Saturday, January 19th, from 5:00 to 6:30 at the St. Michaels Inn in St. Michaels MD, 1228 S. Talbot Street. Click here for ticket sales.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Sassafras a la Francaise

Share

The massing, varied roof planes and color palette drew me to this house that reminded me of a European country cottage. The story-and a half look with the recessed front porch, shed dormers, two turreted rooms, the smooth creamy facade, light olive trim and shutters with the light brown roofing created a beautiful composition. The rear of the house was dominated by the sunroom with walls of windows for expansive water views. Directly behind the sunroom was a large family room with a fireplace and the adjacent spacious dining room would be the perfect spot for Thanksgiving dinner. Doors from the sunroom, dining room and kitchen created an easy flow between indoors and outdoors.

I loved the geometry of the kitchen with its angled walls and ceiling planes with stained beams at each segment of the turret’s bays. The warm hardwood floors, white cabinets, the stove hood, blue tile counters and backsplash gave it a French country look. The other turreted room was the master bath with its angled ceilings of wood. The sunroom with its views to the river was the hub of the house and with plenty of space for sitting and dining areas one could easily linger there for relaxing after boating on the river or a tennis match.

The second floor bedrooms were tucked under the shed dormers that created delightful interior architecture. The bedrooms’ interior design had a combination of paneling and drywall with stained or painted finishes and the double window dormers in each bedroom created a cozy nook with views to the water. One of the bedrooms had twin beds with headboards in a ship’s wheel design for young sailors. As appealing as the guest bedrooms were, if I were a guest, I would claim the cozy detached guesthouse for my stay.

Wonderful architecture, great floor plan and the river beyond the lovely landscaping-as the French would say, “formidable!”

For more information about this property, contact Pat Kern with Gunther McClary Real Estate at 410-275-2118 (o), 443-480-0299 (c) or cdkplk@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”. Photography by Steve Buchanan Photography, 410-212-8753, 310-996-7295, steve@buchananphotography.com, www.buchananphotography.com.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Mill Street Marvelous

Share

The 1730 plat of Chestertown showed a grid of streets that created 100 lots with Mill Street in the middle of the grid. The homes date from the mid 19th century including this Folk Victorian that has been lovingly maintained. The three bay front elevation with its light blue siding, yellow shutters, white trim and the Victorian details of brackets and fretwork gave it great curb appeal. The porch spanned across the front of the house and opened to the side to maximize the seating area.

As an architect, I also enjoy interior design and this house’s interiors were equally as appealing as the exterior. The focal point of the living room was the fireplace and chimney set slightly forward of the millwork on either side. In the center of each floor to ceiling millwork was an arched opening with shelving. The bright blue background of the arched openings complemented the colorful artwork over the fireplace and enhanced this room’s personality.

The dining room walls had a white wainscot below soft sage-green walls above.  A large multi-colored circular braided rug anchored the round table centered in the middle of the room opposite another fireplace. The dark wood of the table and chairs, the painted sideboard and the wood chest, lamps for accent lighting and the crystal chandelier above the table created a delightful eclectic look to enjoy as one lingered over dinner.

The wainscot and sage green walls continued into the adjacent kitchen. I loved how the kitchen kept period details during its upgrade. The mix of open shelving and closed upper cabinets, the period hardware, “subway” tile backsplash between the white craftsman styled cabinets, granite counter and the pot rack over the kitchen window made this cook want to find an apron and get to work. Opposite the “L” shaped work area was a wood free-standing piece of furniture with a deep top that became an island with room for three chairs.  The wall between the kitchen and dining room had another fireplace but the firebox opening was filled in with a mural. Instead of a mantel, a curlicued metal rack held colorful ceramic pieces. Next to the fireplace a pantry was partially hidden by doors with sheer fabric panels. A wonderful room!

The master suite with its warm light blue walls, white bed linens and antique armoire would be a restful retreat after a soak in the extra-long deep craw foot tub. Another bedroom had deeper sage green walls, and a wedding-ring quilt over the white bed linens.

Another porch spanned the rear of the house and was divided into an open area and a screened area. The rear yard was a verdant oasis of shade trees, crape myrtle, and a hardscaped area laid in brick with a table and chairs for al-fresco dining. Plantings were carefully planned and selected for low-maintenance that would bloom through spring, summer and fall.  There was also a firepit for cool fall evenings.  A charming shed was at the rear of the lot for storage or studio use.

A historic home whose details were carefully restored like the refinished heart pine flooring, moldings, built-ins, charming interior design and an urban garden in the middle of Town-who could resist?

 

For more information about this property, contact Liddy Campbell with Cross Street Realtors at410-778-3779 (o), 410-708-5433 (c) or liddy@screaltors.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Mid-Shore Food: Piazza’s Adopt-an-Alp Program 2018

Share

Piazza Italian Market is pleased to announce it will again participate in the Adopt-an-Alp program. This five-year-old program was created to generate awareness and appreciation for the endangered practice of transhumance and to highlight “real” Swiss cheeses. Piazza was one of three winners of this competition in 2016 which resulted in a free trip to visit alpine dairies for one member of the Piazza team. Owner Emily Chandler selected Brandy McKinney to represent the store.

Historically, many cheeses in Switzerland and other Alpine countries were produced via transhumance. As the summer sun warms the slopes, green grass sprouts, and the cows follow. Herdsmen were just behind the hungry cows, living and making cheese in small huts. While the idea of spending a solitary summer high up on a Swiss mountain with only animals for company might sound idyllic, life away from the comforts of home is not easy. Some of the huts that provide shelter have neither running water nor electricity. Remarkably, production of Alpage (cheese made from alpine-grazed cow’s milk) has increased over the last 5 years, arguably due to the Adopt-an-Alp program.

Piazza has selected to adopt Alp Trosen this year. Brandy McKinney of Piazza Italian Market visited Alp Trosen in 2017 and was struck by the humbleness of the operation and the quality of its cheese. Jakob Knaus Sr. stays on the alp for 9 weeks, most of the time alone. During this time, he lives in a one room chalet directly above the stables. There are few modern amenities at this 500-year-old hut, only a government-required filtered water system and solar panels. Jakob is required by the Alpkäse consortium to use a wood fire and a copper kettle to warm the milk for cheesemaking. These little details result in a sum that is more than its parts. Importer Caroline Hostetter describes Alp Trosen’s cheese as very flavorful and having “a lot of the earth” in it, even when young, and the rest of us can’t wait to try it!

To celebrate the arrival of the cheeses, there will be an Alp Dinner on Saturday, November 17th at Piazza. Featured chef Rosario del Nero will be using the Swiss alpkäse to cook dishes from his native alpine valley in Italy, the Valtellina. Tickets will become available in October.

Additionally, we will be celebrating the transhumance practice by unique events created by Jenn Martella, Special Events Coordinator. She will once again involve the community by reading at the children’s hour at the Talbot County branch libraries, a cowbell art contest for artists of all ages and Swiss jeopardy at the kick off dinner. Prizes will be awarded to the winners.

Adopt-an-Alp was created by Caroline Hostetter at Quality Cheese and it is officially supported by Schweizerischer Alpwirtschaftlicher Verband (SAV), (translates to Swiss Society of Alp Economy) a Swiss government agency for protecting and marketing Alp products including the platform http://alpkase.ch. All cheeses sold through the Adopt-an-Alp program are exclusively imported by Mifroma USA and distributed by Atalanta Corp.

For more information about the art contest or to make a reservation for the Alp Dinner please call Jennifer Martella at 410-253-1100.