Spy House of the Week: Urban Charm with Expansive View

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This street between the heart of downtown Chestertown and Washington College is a quiet short cross street with congenial residents who hold block parties and Holiday Open Houses for their neighbors. The house is sited on a lot with open space behind the rear of the property that is protected from development which extends the view from the house to the trees beyond. The mix of brick and wood lattice foundation, light green lap siding with creamy white trim, the center front door surrounded by windows and the front porch that is slightly inset from the front façade all contribute to the house’s charm. One of my design pet peeves is using unadorned square posts to support porch roofs so I especially appreciated the detailing of this porch with the caps, trim and plinths for the columns and stair newel posts. The lattice at one side gives some privacy but lets the light and breezes filter in and flow through this delightful outdoor room.

The entry is separated from the living room by a wide elliptical arch that opens the stair to the room. A corbeled brick fireplace with a wood stove insert at the front of the room flanked by windows is another focal point and the hardwood floors create a restful spot for relaxing at the end of the day. The bold red walls of the dining room and the white corner cabinet between the two windows also caught my eye. I have the same style of upholstered chairs in my dining room and the fully upholstered chairs in this room are great extra seating around the Queen Anne styled table and chairs.

I love to cook and this large kitchen is well designed with its “C” shape, island with stools opposite another wall of cabinets with a wall oven. The kitchen extends into the butler pantry and wet bar area that ends at the French doors to the deck overlooking the rear yard. The wood cabinets with period hardware, stainless steel appliances, solid surface countertops and hardwood floors create a great spot for cooking with direct access to both the dining room and the deck for dining with family and friends.

The second and third floors contain the master bedroom and bath with a soaking tub and separate shower. Two other bedrooms, another bath and laundry complete the floor plan. The third floor is a great space with its knee walls and sloped ceilings that is furnished as a wonderful bedroom and sitting area divided by the stairs. The house was renovated in 2008 and the current tenants have lovingly maintained it.

For more information about this property, please contact Jennifer Mobley at Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate Company, 410-778-0330 (o), 443-350-5917 (c), or jmobley@cbchesapeake.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

 

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Upper Chester River Dutch Colonial

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This house began its architectural life with a couple who built the original section  in 1999 as a weekend retreat. The current owners quickly saw its potential as a permanent home and constructed an addition of over 3,500 sf. of living space that transformed the old and new into a permanent home.  I love the Colonial styles of American architecture and Dutch Colonial is one of my favorites. The gambrel roofs and dormers add charm-the dormers on this house have either double or triple windows for expansive views of the landscape.   

The center hall plan begins at the double French entry doors and ends at the rear single French door and offer vistas to the landscape.  I like how the front doors are in the middle of the front elevation and the triple window above in the largest of the dormers marks the entry behind a long front porch. The telescoped side wing, wide roof dormers and the porch break down the massing for great curb appeal. The rear elevation is equally pleasing with a two story shed roof breaking the gambrel roofs on either side. The terrace the full length of the house paved with interlocking stones is ready for a modern day Fred and Ginger to dance the night away.

The great room is the hub of the house with sitting and dining areas open to the large gourmet kitchen.  Scandinavian styled millwork and dining chairs blend with upholstered pieces for a contemporary look. The second floor master suite at one side of the house has French doors to the deck with stairs to the stone terrace below. The original house is now a guest suite with a sitting area and its own kitchen.

The aerial photograph shows how the house is a short walk through the woods to the Upper Chester River. Great design, privacy in almost three wooded acres- it is no wonder the current owners made it a permanent home.

 

For more information about this property, contact Doug Ashley with Doug Ashley Realtors at 410-810-0010 (o), 410-708-0408 (c) or doug@dougashleyrealtors.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Dixon’s Furniture Auction: Nirvana in Crumpton by Jennifer Martella

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My interior design friends have told me for several years now about the legendary Dixon’s Furniture Auction in Crumpton.  I have been trying to downsize the scale of my furnishings to better suit my 1900’s farmhouse and felt it was time to pay a visit to Crumpton.  I finally had the opportunity to visit recently with a new friend as a guide who has a shop in DC that specializes in vintage jewelry and she invited me to accompany her on one of her weekly Crumpton visits.  I arrived early and had an opportunity to look around and read the framed articles about Dixon’s history and learned it is a third generation company that was founded in 1961 by Norman Dixon.

Seven auctioneers on on-site and their combined experience exceeds 210 years so they know how to set the minimum bids.  Fascinating facts about Dixon are that they sometimes conduct three to four auctions simultaneously resulting an average of 200 items sold per hour or 3,000 to 6,000 lots a week; items are consigned the morning of the sale and sold by 5:00 pm the same day and consignors may bring anything ranging from a single item to the contents of an entire house. Consignors are either paid after the auction is over or if they are not in attendance, Dixon’s mails checks out every Thursday. Regular buyers can set up house accounts.


The auction categories include furniture, tools and household a items; antique smalls and jewelry, coin and showcase.  Furniture, tools and household and antique smalls consignors call the main office on Monday between 9:00 am to 3:00 pm to reserve a space.  They may then drop off their consignments on Tuesdays from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm or Wed. from 6:00 am to 8:00 am prior to the auction beginning at 8:30 am. For the Antique Smalls, 53 tables are available to consignors each week. On the day you set up, you stop by the office to receive your table assignment.  The Jewelry, Coins and Showcase schedule is slightly different. This sale begins at 1:00 pm so a consignor can also bring their lots from 7:00 am to 10:00 am on Wednesdays.

On the day I visited, the front of the warehouse contained furniture ranging in styles from Art Deco, Craftsman, Gothic, Mid-Century, etc. Antiques sat next to more recent handmade pieces. At the rear of the warehouse were tables with glass topped cases of jewelry for each lot.  Buyers must buy a single lot even if they only want a few items and knowing they will get a range of quality and value. Tables behind the jewelry held a range of miscellaneous items. My mother’s family had vase and punch bowl make of Carnival glass and the colors always appealed to me. Much to my surprise I found a Carnival candy dish but could not stay to place a bid. My friend was lucky and bought two lots of jewelry for her store.

The Auctioneer has a mobile chair set high above the crowd for visibility and he zipped around the building after his rapid delivery about each item in every lot.  Keep in mind this is a live auction and you must be careful of body language that may signal you are placing a bid-catching the eye of the auctioneer, nodding your head, raising your hand, etc. may get you an unexpected item! I kept my hands in my pocket and avoided eye contact with the Auctioneer.  You may also bid online by going online to Dixon’s website , www.crumptonauctions.com, and download their App.

The auction schedule is set for 2019, and occurs every Wednesday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, with these exceptions:  May 29th, July 3rd, September 4th,November 27th and December 25th. Wear comfortable walking shoes and there are a few benches near the food area when you can rest or wait until the lot that interests you is up. If the weather is bad, you may also bid online by going to Dixon’s website, and download their App. You just don’t know what you will find each auction day and by the end of my day there I was hooked.

Dixon’s Furniture Auction is located near Chestertown at 2017 Dudley Corners Rd, Crumpton, MD, 21628. For more information, call 410-928-3006 or visit their website.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Rive Du Temps

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In my orientation class when I was a freshman in architecture at UT Knoxville, the instructor pointed out that most people do not hire architects. Thankfully many people in our area do. Beginning this month, I will add new houses or renovations/additions designed by an architect to the weekly mix of Houses of the Week. This house, christened “Rive Du Temp” by its owner, was designed by Peter Newlin, FAIA, of Chesapeake Architects.

In her preliminary programming discussions with Peter, the Owner asked for a “thoroughly interesting house” with “an intimate experience of the weather and nature”.  She also expressed a fondness for curved walls. Peter listened intently and their collaboration resulted in a site plan and house design that is tres’ magnifique!

The wooded site sits on the bank of the Chester River and the river curves and turns both upriver and downriver to provide broad long views from the house.  The vista across the site is a serene view of woods and off to the right the top part of a silo is the only building in sight. The wooded landscape on either side of the house gives it privacy from its nearest neighbors.

The approach to the house is via a sand colored gravel drive and suddenly you notice the garage and house quietly hidden in the woods by its bark-colored siding. The gravel drive is edged in red brick adjacent to large stone pavers that delineate the walk to the house. After meandering through the landscape you reach a short brick retaining wall with steps down to the clearing at the house and the path continues to the steps at the front door. A previous house had burned and this house was built on top of the original rectangular footprint to maintain the close proximity to the water. The detached garage and the hyphen from the main house to the “summerhouse” disguise the original house’s simple geometry.

The airy summerhouse is a delight with its screened walls and curved ceiling.  The roof decking is painted light cream to reflect the light from the clerestory windows at the rear and to accentuate the bark-brown roof joists.  I could easily imagine dozing in a hammock in this marvelous space through the summer.

In homage to historic Maryland houses, the center hall plan separates one sitting room from the kitchen, dining area and another sitting room.  A rhythm of two rows of beautifully detailed wood columns with headers float below the exposed ceiling joists. The vista ends at French doors to the deck overlooking the water. On either side of the center hall, bowed walls of windows capture the broad views of the river bends, opening the entire rear wall to the water views.  

Another curved wall of cabinetry becomes a boundary to the kitchen area and a soffit above echoes that curvature. Instead of walls, the dining area between the two sitting rooms is defined by millwork on each side and on one side upper cabinets with glass fronts continue the transparency. The cross-axis of the house leads on one side to the hyphen and summerhouse and on the other side are stairs to the second floor bedroom suites.

At the top of the stair is a quarter circle overlook with views through the skylights above the sitting area below that would be the perfect space to inspire creative work. The focal point of the master bedroom is the exquisite wooden carved headboard whose sinuous intertwined form is tucked under low windows that overlook the sitting room below and are opposite skylights for daylight or moonlight to filter within.

The Owner’s collections of Native American pottery and other artifacts from her travels, art, accessories and furnishings articulate this house’s unique personality.  The free-standing chimney that separates one sitting room from the passage to the hyphen and the summerhouse is also slightly curved and is inscribed with lines from a poem by Lamartine: ”Le temps n’a pas de rive, L’homme n’a pas de port “ (Time has no riverbank-Man has no port). A fitting coda for a visit to this remarkable house by a gifted architect and a client with a sophisticated vision. The jury for the Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the AIA agreed and awarded  “Rive du Temp” a Citation of Excellence in Architecture. The house was also featured on an episode of HGTV’s “Dream Builders , episode 1207.

Architecture by Peter Newlin of Chesapeake Architects,  410-778-4899, peter@chesarch.com, www.chesarch.comContractor: Patrick Jones, Allen/Jones Inc. Custom Lighting: Deep Landing Workshop, 410-778-4042, www.deeplandingworkshop.com and Woody Labat, Cabinetmaker Area Rug Designs: Marcy RamseyCustom Headboard:  Sculptor Don Carslon and Joshua Miller, Cabinetmaker  Photography: Tyler Campbell, 410-778-4938, tylercam@friend.ly.net

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Pining for Pine Acres

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“Green Acres” was a late sixties sitcom about a New York City attorney who pines for “farm living” and persuades his reluctant wife to give up their New York penthouse. If he had been a boater instead, I could imagine his pining for this “Pine Acres” property surrounded by 3-1/4 wooded acres and a dock on Lovely Cove which leads to the East Fork of Langford Creek. This cottage style house very close to the water make this property a tranquil weekend retreat. Outbuildings include a garage, workshop, storage and potting sheds for non-nautical weekend pursuits.

The house is perpendicular to the water to give panoramic views of the water from most rooms in the house. The symmetrical middle wing with two pairs of triple windows and two dormer windows above has two wings on either side. One wing has a bay window to the master bedroom and the other wing is a sunroom with wrap-around windows broken by the chimney. The color palette of pale yellow siding, light green metal roof, white windows and the massing is a very pleasing combination.  

The contemporary kitchen has corner windows above the sink and a table for informal meals.  The main sitting room is open to the sunroom for views of the water beyond to expand the living space. The interior design contains Oriental accents in the Shojii screen doors in the bath, the master bedroom headboard and other details.  The loft contains another bedroom with a window in the gable end and a dormer windows facing the water.

A serene waterfront setting and charming cottage architectural style-an appealing  weekend retreat. Now, if I can just get that “Green Acres” jingle out of my head…

For more information about this property ,contact Dick Barker with Coldwell Banker Real Estate Company at 410-778-0330 (o), 410-708-7594 (c),  “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Town Home Living

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Each year as my list of repairs or renovations needed for my 1900’s farmhouse grows longer, I think about what it would be like to live instead in a new townhome like this one. “The Village” development has a community pond with a fountain, paved walkways with benches along the way and a gazebo for relaxing outdoors. The front elevation of this unit’s building has great appeal with its wide center gable and side wings with wrap-around porches that contain only four units so the massing is not overwhelming. Parking is at the rear of the building so the front vista from inside each unit is of lawn and water.

I especially liked the space planning and the contemporary interior design of this unit. To break up the rectangular interior architecture, the front and rear doors are recessed into the space and the full-height rear kitchen wall creates an enclosure for the dining room beyond. Triple windows at the front and rear of the main floor and  triple and double windows on the second floor flood the spaces with light and the hardwood floors add warmth. One of my favorite Italian antique posters adds color and perspective to the side wall of the dining room.

I love the look of the sitting area with the bright red of the settee and ottoman  angled behind the white coffee table to expand the space. The two-tiered coffee table has wheels so it can be moved to accommodate larger parties. Patterned pillows and art add more color and the white upholstered chairs, bar stools and storage unit beneath the TV complete the sophisticated look. The kitchen is open to but separated from the sitting area by a breakfast bar for quick meals or for guests to sit and keep the cook company.

The master suite with its triple window, the sleek contemporary furnishings,  photographic art and the gray/black/white color scheme would be a serene retreat.  Two other bedrooms on the second floor give one options if a home office is need as this unit has.  There is also a basement for ample storage. It is no surprise that this unit is under contract so I will keep looking!

For more information about this property, contact Retha Arrabal with Doug Ashley Realtors at 410-810-0010, ext. 303 (o), 410-708-2172 (c) or rarrabal@hotmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

 

Spy Architecture Lecture by Simon Jacobsen Set for January 19

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The Spy is pleased to announce that Simon Jacobsen will make a presentation of his firm’s work over the Martin Luther King holiday weekend on Saturday, January 19th, from 5:00 to 6:30 at the St. Michaels Inn in St. Michaels. Simon is the son of Hugh Newell Jacobsen and they formed Jacobsen Architecture in 2007.  Tickets can be purchased here.

Our Habitat Jenn Martella, summarized their work recently in the Spy and we have re-published it here: 

My second job as an architectural intern was with Gini L. Pettus & Associates in Atlanta. The focus of her practice was interior commercial architecture but we both enjoyed discussing residential architecture and soon discovered our mutual admiration for the work of Hugh Newell Jacobsen.

After I moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004, I was delighted to discover two of his houses from excursions with friends on the water. After visiting the firm’s website, I learned that Jacobsen had designed several houses in Talbot County and his Bachelor of Arts degree was from the University of Maryland. I like to think that on breaks from his studies he made sojourns to the Eastern Shore to enjoy the peaceful pre-Bay Bridge rural architecture and landscape.

What I admire about Jacobsen’s work is how he drew his inspiration from the distinctively American vernacular rural architecture-sheds, smokehouses, detached kitchens and barns. The essence of his iconic style were series of pavilions devoid of ornamentation that evoked Shaker architectural design. His contemporary interpretation of the “telescope” houses of the Eastern Shore, became, in his gifted hands, simple geometric plans with gable roofs and chimneys that rose through the steep roof planes to become sculptural elements. His unique style set him apart from his fellow second-generation Modernists peers.

He also designed houses ranging from Jackie Kennedy Onassis’ home on Martha’s Vineyard to the “1998 Life Dream House,” Life Magazine’s promotion of houses designed by famous architects whose plans were made available to the public.

His son Simon is the Founding Principal of Jacobsen Architecture and explains his firm’s design philosophy as “…our detailing is deliberately sparse and linear in order to enhance the spaces within and without … the site is the dominant factor. The quality of the light upon that particular area of earth is always unique and determines the path the architecture will take.” The firm’s houses on the Eastern Shore embody that design philosophy and my favorite of the Eastern Shore houses is the original Green Residence that as of 2017 has a new owner.

The Greene Residence was built on the Wye East River close to the Chesapeake Bay. The client, a New York advertising executive, retained Hugh Newell Jacobsen in 1971 to design a year-around house. On one of his first visits to the site, the client sprinkled cedar seedlings along the shoreline that have matured into a tall grove to protect the house from the winter storms off the Bay and to frame and shade the exquisite house.

Like the older houses of the Tidewater, the Green house has white walls and steep roofs but the similarity ends there. Unlike historic Tidewater houses, this plan’s massing and functions are organized into pavilions defined by the function within. Some of the pavilions are linked by connections with walls of frameless panes of glass resting on brick sills for a striking solid/void juxtaposition of wall and glass. Other pavilions are slightly shifted from each other with just enough space for construction workers to accomplish their tasks. The lack of exterior soffits, gutters and trim is a careful and deliberate abstraction of traditional detailing.

Many of the pavilions have floor to ceiling glass panes at the main level to create an “outlook” to the landscape and water beyond. Above the large glass panes are two levels of multi-paned transoms. The bottom row is open to the main floor of the pavilion and the upper row becomes windows for the second floor. The lack of interior trim allows the wall and floor planes to seamlessly merge and the steep pitched roofs with dormers creates delightful spaces for the guest suites or the loft for the Owner’s artistic endeavors.

The Green house consists of six pavilions. There are two center pavilions with the front pavilion being the entrance hall and support functions. Behind the entry pavilion a short hall leads to the rear sitting room pavilion that faces the water. The rear corners of this dramatic room are floor to ceiling glass panels and the massive chimney rises through the pitched ceiling. At the front corners, glass walled connections on each side lead to two pavilions that are set on a diagonal to the entry and sitting room pavilions. The kitchen/breakfast and dining room pavilion is on the right and is slightly shifted from the garage pavilion by a solid connection. Off the kitchen pavilion, the long pool reaches out to the water and a fence hides the motor court of the garage pavilion. On the left, another sitting room pavilion and the master suite pavilion complete the composition. Terraces off the sitting rooms offer expansive views of the water.

Two guest suites were located on the second floor. One suite is accessed by a “U” shaped cantilevered stair that floats above the floor of the diagonal sitting room pavilion and the other suite is accessed by a spiral stair in the kitchen pavilion. Since the two suites are separated by the main sitting room pavilion, they have total privacy.

The interiors are white to better reflect the light from the varied sources and the firm’s signature “Eggcrate” bookcases are found in the diagonal sitting room. The Mid-Century Modern furnishings include the leather and polished chrome Le Corbusier sofas and the wood Scandinavian dining room table and chairs. It would be very difficult for this architect to choose a favorite detail but the vista from one of the glass-walled connections through the glass corner of the adjacent pavilion to the water beyond was breathtaking.

The Green Residence is a masterpiece of a gifted architect’s vision of domestic architecture in the early 20th century. The photographs that accompany this article were taken last year and belie the age of this iconic house.

Jacobsen Architecture was founded in 2007 by Hugh and Simon Jacobsen and is the recipient of over 140 awards in architecture, design and interiors. The firm’s work spans from much of the US, Caribbean, Europe, and Asia. Besides many accolades and publications, the firm has been nominated for the AIA’s Gold Medal four times and is longest running recipient of Architectural Digest’s AD100, the magazine’s list of the top 100 design talents internationally. The Jacobsens are currently working on a new book to be published by Rizzoli titled “Jacobsen Architecture: 12 Houses by Hugh and Simon Jacobsen”.

If you are one of the lucky few on the Eastern Shore to own a Jacobsen house, please contact the Spy as we would welcome another opportunity to feature more of these unique American houses.

For further inspiration, visit the firm’s website . Photographs of the Green Residence courtesy of Sean Shananhan Photography, Sean@shanahanphotography.com, 703-582-9462. 

The Spy is pleased to announce that Simon Jacobsen will make a presentation of his firm’s work over the Martin Luther King holiday weekend on Saturday, January 19th, from 5:00 to 6:30 at the St. Michaels Inn in St. Michaels MD, 1228 S. Talbot Street. Click here for ticket sales.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy Holiday House: Granny Branch Farm

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Spy Christmas House:  Granny Branch Farm

This is my second holiday card to Spy readers and I am delighted to feature Granny Branch Farm, the home of interior designer Jane Keller of Bountiful Interiors and her husband, Gordon Bjorkman. Prior to joining Bountiful Interiors, Jane was the owner and principal of Keller Interiors LLC in Church Hill. Jane has always worked in a creative field and began her career as a graphic designer. She then became a creative consultant who specialized in corporate branding and identity for many of the top Fortune 500 companies. Becoming Creative Director for the Bob Van Allen Studio gave her the direction of the textile design, product design and branding for the home furnishings collection of Waverly/Schumacher including hand-painted silk screen textiles for Mary McFadden’s couture collection. Her diverse background led her to interior design where she uses her creative talent in fashion, textiles and graphic design to create beautiful spaces.  Her home also includes many of her drawings, paintings and photography and her work is found in collections throughout the United States and Europe.

Jane grew up in Annapolis and called many historic houses home. When she and her husband decided to move from Annapolis to the Eastern Shore, they sought a historic house. Granny Branch Farm was love at first “site” for them and its quiet rural setting,  a short distance from 301, was a plus. The original brick building, circa 1735, is listed as “the James Marshall Farm” by the Maryland Historical Trust. There were also six outbuildings including a 19th century smokehouse and original creameries.

Jane put her creative energy to work and guided by her and her husband’s love of history, art and antiques, renovated and modernized their new home without compromising the original spatial layout. Some of their work included restoring the original fireplaces in both the living and dining rooms, opening up the kitchen ceiling to expose the  wood collar beams and adding new cabinets, countertops and appliances. The kitchen also has a Vermont wood stove next to a cozy seating area. The large kitchen island often contains one of Gordon’s Swedish smorgasbords.

Granny Branch Farm will be the Spy house of the Week in early January, so stay tuned for a detailed description of this beautiful historic house enhanced by Jane’s interior design.

 

Interior design by Jane Keller of Bountiful Interiors, 410-819-8666, 443-994-2934 (c), or jane@bountifuldecor.com

Many thanks to the sellers who invited me into their homes, the agents and their administrative assistants who shared their pictures with me and my fellow architects who shared their creative work in 2018.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Cozy Cottage

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I can’t resist quirky cottages and this cottage nestled in the woods on the banks of a river has all the characteristics of craftsman cottages-hipped roof with dormers, deep eaves, white trim and wood shake siding that have weathered beautifully. Both the front porch and a screened porch with steps down to a waterside wood deck offer great options for enjoying being outdoors. I could imagine resting on the deck after a swim, fishing, boating on the river or simply dangling my legs over the edge of the deck to cool off after sunbathing. In short, the perfect weekend getaway.

The interior reminds me of a camp cottage-most of the finishes were wood with darker wood floors and lighter wood walls and ceilings for low maintenance. The focal point of the living room is the fireplace with a brick chimney that corbels up on each side and becomes a backdrop for the mantel with accents of a darker colored brick hearth and mantel trim. A French door leads to the screened porch for catching cooling breezes.

The kitchen/dining area also has the same chimney treatment but here a wood storage unit has been cleverly inserted in front of the chimney. In the kitchen the ceiling joists and decking are painted white and the white kitchen cabinets lightens the space. Two wide windows at the dining area open onto the river view. Next to the kitchen is a large family room with another dining area and seating around a wood stove and TV. The master bedroom on the main level is paneled in wood but the second bedrooms tucked under the roof have a wood wainscot painted white and painted drywall above. A small sitting area with a TV makes a great guest suite.

Given the wooded setting and the water below, my favorite room is the screened porch that spans across the rear of the house. The middle section extends out toward the water for more seating space. Steps lead down to the wood deck at the water’s edge that would be a great space for a party.

 

 

For more information about this property contact Mary Fielding with Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate Company at 410-778-0330 (o), 410-708-4852 (c) , or mfielding@cbchesapeake.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

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