Art Commentary: Elizabeth Casqueiro’s ‘Entrances and Exits” by Heather Harvey

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The paintings in Elizabeth Casqueiro’s new exhibition straddle and combine abstraction with realism. Her imagery nearly comes into focus, only to dissolve and shift into various alternate readings. Brightly saturated colors and vivid painterly strokes seem jubilant and humorous in moments, then soften into quiet passages and muted colors, then shift again into dark, brooding, more sinister marks. These divergent painting strategies allow multiple storylines and moods to co-exist on one canvas.

Entrance and Exit

The multilayered, fluctuating quality may grow out of Casqueiro’s biography. She has lived most of her adult life in the United States, but her birth and formative years unfolded in the authoritarian malaise of post-world war Portugal. As a child she was deeply drawn to the promise and excitement of American culture. Imported pulp fiction and comic books offered her a heady mix of hope, heroism, drama, risk, and romance. This gave young Elizabeth what she calls her first “early glimpse of an outside world,” beyond home, neighborhood, country, culture, and the confines of her own mind. Many decades later and a fraught American political landscape have added new layers of complexity to the narratives of her youth.

In some paintings Casqueiro draws mainly from superhero stories. She breaks compositions down into smaller areas loosely suggestive of comic book panels. Unclear dramas unfold with flashes of superheroes, villains, and good (hopefully) conquering evil. Other paintings allude more to theater, drama, and the stage as metaphors for life. Casqueiro is particularly interested in the tension between private, inner life versus social, communal life. She recognizes that many consider private inner life as more ‘authentic’ or ‘true,’ but Casqueiro doesn’t see it quite that way. For her, the social masks and personas we wear are as much a part of our identity as solitary periods spent with oneself.

Come On Batman

In her work Casqueiro mines both the heroic exuberance of childhood and the complex absurdities of adulthood. Childhood becomes more complicated then we typically give it credit for, and adults not so different from their younger counterparts. Superheroes and dramatic personas perhaps reflect our ego’s need for respite and protection from the barrages of reality. They create a barrier between delicate interior experience and pressing external demands.

Elizabeth Casqueiro’s solo exhibition Entrances and Exits is open April 14 through July 15, 2018 at the Academy Art Museum. Reception: April 20th 5:30-7pm and Artist Talk: May 4th at 5:30 pm. For more information on Elizabeth Casqueiro’s work see https://www.elizabethcasqueiro.com

Heather Harvey is an artist living in Easton, MD and Associate Professor and Chair of the Art and Art History Department at Washington College.

Mid-Shore Arts: A Quick View of ‘Beginnings’ at the Massoni

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With fourteen artists making up the Massoni Gallery’s spring show in Chestertown entitled Beginnings, it’s pretty hard for the Spy, or anyone else for the matter, to adequately capture in words the brilliance of the new work these gifted masters on display.

We, therefore, found it helpful to once again use images and video to give our readers just a small sense of the collective magic of the art displayed to encourage visitors to drop by the High Street gallery for their own inspection to see the work of James Tatum, Elizabeth Casqueiro, Deborah Weiss, Heidi Fowler, Joe Karlik, Susan Hostetler, Blake Conroy, Katherine Allen, Marc Castelli, Alessandra Manzotti, Elizabeth DaCosta Ahern, Larry Schroth, Vicco Von Voss, and Katherine Cox.

Beginnings will close on May 4th

This video is approximately one minute in length. For more information on Massoni Art please go here

 

Garfield Center Hires Rebecca Lepter as Development Director

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The Board of Directors and Executive Director Tess Hogans are thrilled to announce that Rebecca Lepter has joined the staff as the new Development Director at the Garfield Center for the Arts. Rebecca is coming to the theatre from For All Seasons where she served as the Director of Grants & Contracts from 2016 until this year, and from Family and Community Partnerships of Kent County, which she directed from 2010-2016.

“After reviewing all of the applicants, it was clear that Becky was the best choice because of her extensive experience working with grants and in our local community.” Says Hogans.“She has already brought her exceptional work ethic to tackle two monstrous events (Women Helping Women and Broadway by the River) which were thrown in her lap as a new hire, and she handled them magnificently.”

Garfield Center Board Vice President Judy Kohl writes, “Becky completes the final piece in the puzzle!  The GCA now has a dynamic team to lead us into the next decade.”

She will be working directly under Hogans, exploring new grant opportunities and managing relationships with the organizations which currently provide general operating grants to the Garfield. She will also be coordinating the rentals, partnerships and special events that take place in the Garfield throughout the year. Lepter adds, “I am deeply honored to join the Garfield because of the role it plays in modeling innovation and progressiveness in our region. It will be a privilege and a joy to work with the exceptional staff, board and stakeholders to enhance the cultural life of our community by nurturing, celebrating, and supporting arts and artists through performing arts.”

A life-long resident of the Eastern Shore, she looks forward to moving the Garfield into a new era of growth. Rebecca lives in Sudlersville with her husband Steve and their two boys, Clark and Colin.

Arts & Entertainment District Announces “Tea Bag” Art Project

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The Chestertown Arts & Entertainment District and the Main Street Chestertown Design Committee announce the Tea Party Festival Tea Bag public art project for 2018.  Artists, designers, students and creative spirits of all ages are invited to decorate cotton tote-bags with Tea Party or Chestertown themes and can compete for cash prizes.

The tote bags measure 15 inches square and come with a label that carries the Tea Party Festival logo and the tagline, “Chestertown: Steeped in History, Stirred by Art.”  They can be decorated with paint, markers, thread, found objects, or any other embellishment.  Three finalist prizes of $50 each and one grand prize of $100 will be awarded.

Participants can pick up the plain tote bags at Town Hall, 118 N. Cross Street, for $2.00 per bag. All decorated tote bags will remain the property of their creators. To enter the judging, the embellished bag must be returned to Town Hall by Thursday, May 24, 2018.  Winners will be announced at the Friday night Tea Party Street Party scheduled for the foot of High Street, May 25.

The AAM @ 60 with Ben Simons and Anke Van Wagenberg

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There are just a handful of cultural and educational institutions that unite the five counties of the Mid-Shore of Maryland.  Those that come to mind immediately are such legendary schools as Washington College, UM’s Horn Point Labs, and Chesapeake College as well as those that celebrate our cultural heritage like the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum and the Sultana Educational Foundation.

But there is only one organization that has been successfully uniting the region’s centuries-old love affair with fine arts, and that would be the Academy Art Museum. And that remarkable center for art education and exhibitions hits an impressive milestone this year as it reaches its 60th year of existence and there is good reason to celebrate that fact.

Founded by local artists and collectors, the Academy has grown from relatively modest roots to a superb example of what a regional arts institution powerhouse can be.  Now with literally hundreds of classes, lectures, field trips, and, of course, world-class art exhibitions taking place every year, the AAM has rapidly becoming known nationally as the “small but mighty” art center.

When any institution of this caliber reaches 60 years, it is almost mandated that it take stock of its accomplishments to share with its members, donors, and the general public, what it has been able to achieve since it opened its doors. That it indeed the case with the Academy this year as it offers special programming and art exhibitions to celebrate this remarkable achievement.

It also was an excellent time to review the museum’s permanent collection with the intention of showcasing the very best of the best for visitors to enjoy the extraordinary diversity of visual art, sculpture and photography the AAM has secured through the generous donations of art collectors, many of them local, or through the wise and selective use of their modest annual acquisition funds.

The Spy sat down with AAM director Ben Simons and chief curator Anke Van Wagenberg this week to talk about the museum’s artwork and the difficult task of selecting 120 of the most significant examples from a total of 1,500 works which will be shown in two major exhibitions during the year.

This video is approximately three minutes in length. For more information about the Academy Art Museum’s Diamond Exhibition Project please go here

 

RiverArts’ 9th Annual “Paint the Town” Plein Air Festival

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Talented artists from throughout the mid-Atlantic region and as far away as Connecticut and New Jersey will be arriving  to paint Chestertown and other local scenes in Kent and upper Queen Anne’s Counties in RiverArts’ 9th Annual “Paint the Town,” taking place April 26-29;

The artists will paint for three days, and it is great fun to watch them at work. On Thursday and Friday they will paint wherever they choose in Kent and Upper Queen Anne’s Counties. On Saturday  artists are encouraged to paint in downtown Chestertown.

The paintings will be framed and available for sale at the free “Wet Paint Reception and Sale” on Saturday, April 28, 5:30-8:00pm at RiverArts. The artists will have their own say by voting “Best in Show” and “Best Body of Work”. Sales tend to be brisk so visitors are encouraged to make their choices during the reception. However, if more time is needed, the paintings can be viewed again on Sunday.

Photo credit: Ken Young

In the Sunday morning “Quick Draw” artists have two hours to paint. Additional artists who were not able to participate during the week  have the opportunity to be part of “Quick Draw.” These paintings will also be for sale 11am-noon in Fountain Park and during the afternoon at the RiverArts Galleries in the breezeway.

Awards will be given for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd places. The public will also be invited to vote for the “People’s Choice.”

The judge for the “Quick Draw” is Sara Linda Poly. This award winning artist has participated in many regional and national shows and plein air competitions. She has spent many years living, traveling, and teaching around the U.S., Europe and Mexico.

Sponsors for the four day event include Cross Street Realtors,  Home Mattress Center, The Peoples Bank, Cheap Joe’s Art Stuff, ACME Markets, and Redner’s Markets.

For more information visit www.chestertownriverarts.org or call RiverArts at 410- 778-6300. Chestertown RiverArts Galleries are located at 315 High Street, Suite 106. (in the breezeway).  Gallery hours are Tuesday – Friday, 11 AM to 5:30 PM, Saturday 10 AM to 5:30 PM, Sunday, 11 AM to 3 PM, and open on First Fridays until 8 PM.

Ben Price and Cliff City at The Mainstay April 28

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Local rising stars Ben Price and Cliff City bring their original tunes to The Mainstay! $10 online AND phone reservation/door.

Cliff City is a newly formed band of friends that practice locally in Kent County.  Their music is a mix of Indie Folk and Pop. Band members are Gabriel Warner on bass, Nick Basham on drums, Alex Spry on lead guitar and bandleader Ben Price on guitar and vocals. Please join us at The Mainstay for an evening of the freshest new sounds in Kent County!

Ben Price is a high school senior who has been playing guitar, singing and writing music for most of his life.  At an early age, Ben was taught by his father and has continued on to study classical Spanish guitar with Kent County’s esteemed strings teacher, Tom Anthony.  Ben has played locally for First Friday events in Chestertown, at the Downrigging Festival and other town events.  He will be attending Full Sail University in Winter Park, Florida next year and plans to major in music production.

Nick Basham, also a high school senior, has been playing drums for seven years.  He has studied with numerous master drummers and Nick’s previous band, Ricochet, has played at The Avalon (Easton, MD) and the Baltimore Soundstage.  Nick plans to major in business and music next year when he enters college.

Gabriel Warner is 17 and has been playing bass guitar since 6th grade.  He is a self-taught musician who has drawn most of his play style and influence from Punk and Pop Rock and has toured around Maryland with his previous band, The 47, playing multiple venues including The Baltimore Soundstage and The Fish Head Cantina.

Alex Spry has been playing guitar for 20 years.  You may have caught him at (the former) Andy’s Bar, the Garfield Center for the Arts or in many of the Music in the Park performances in Chestertown.

This concert is a production of The Mainstay’s Byrd’s Nest featuring student work.  Special thanks to The Peoples Bank for supporting young artists.The Mainstay (Home of Musical Magic) is the friendly informal storefront performing arts center on Rock Hall’s old time Main Street. It is a 501(c)(3), nonprofit dedicated to the arts, serving Rock Hall, MD and the surrounding region and is committed to presenting local, regional and national level talent, at a reasonable price, in an almost perfect acoustic setting. Information and advance ticket sales are available on the Mainstay’s website http://www.mainstayrockhall.org.

Upcoming Mainstay performances include:

April 30 Joe Holt welcomes Cody Leavel
May 4 John Thomas Quartet
May 6 Teodora Adzharova
May 7 Joe Holt welcomes Sam Guthridge
May 10 YacineBoulares and Ajoyo
May 14 Joe Holt welcomes Matt Brower
May 18 Ken and Brad Kolodner Quartet
May 20 Chester River Youth Choir
May 21 Joe Holt welcomes Michael DeMaio

Mid-Shore Arts: Listening to the Earth Art of Stewardship at RiverArts by Mary McCoy

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An egret stalks through the dark water of a marsh in Karen Klinedinst’s iPhoneography print “The Scout.” With its painterly touches and eerie glow, it’s strange and dreamlike, and it gets immediately under your skin. As environmental artists and the curators of this year’s annual “The Art of Stewardship” show at RiverArts, Howard and I chose the theme “Listening to the Earth” to encourage artwork and poetry that, like Klinedinst’s, is inspired by paying close attention to the world around us. What we were looking for is the kind of honed awareness that germinates an open, honest understanding of our situation and responsibilities as part of the community of this earth.

Karen Klinedinst’s iPhoneography print “The Scout.

Does art have the power to effect change? It’s hard to forget an image like “The Scout.” It’s achingly beautiful, yet there’s death everywhere. Rotting vegetation and the skeletons of trees are part and parcel of this intricate and delicate environment. A marsh is a fertile place where fish and crabs spawn and egrets find abundant food, yet stay on high alert lest they, in turn, become dinner for an eagle or raccoon. The strength of Klinedinst’s image is that it takes in and reveals the wholeness of this place. The making of a powerful painting or a poem requires a journey into attentive awareness. It’s a fascinating and nourishing process not only for the artist but for viewers as well, if they, too, approach it with similar open, inquisitive mindfulness

Kate McGraw’s poem, “A Boy and his Dandelion,” may seem at first to be chiefly about a child’s sense of wonder at seeing the flower’s seeds fly into the air, but it’s much more. McGraw summons the thrust of the wind and the scents radiating from the boy’s warm body, skillfully pulling us into the physicality of the moment. She uses words to paint the gossamer, glinting fragility of the tufted seeds and the mystery of where they are going, complete with a hint of their procreative objective. The boy himself imagines them as paratroopers, bravely adventuring into unknown places, and with this, a tingle arises in the back of the mind. This is a primitive urge—to ascribe intention to inanimate objects, to think of them as having aspirations and emotions, in short, as having consciousness.

What leaps to mind is the beliefs of indigenous people in tree spirits, water spirits and the like. These are people who live intimately with the land, aware of its every mood and cycle and the intricacy of the relationships of its plants and animals. Like Klinedinst’s egret, they are wholly dependent on their environment. Far from being quaint and naïve, might their superstitions have a certain wisdom? If we think of animals and plants as having consciousness, however different from our own, we might pay more attention to the ways they live and how their interactions and well-being affect our own survival. Such an approach would develop empathy for species besides our own and encourage a developing understanding of the interdependence of all life on earth.

There’s a prickly sensation of taut vitality emanating from the antler forms in William Willis’s large painting. They feel alive and

Who’s Afraid of the Dark by William Willis

sentient. Behind them are half-hidden forms, perhaps an animal hide stretched to dry, a bowl, a doorway, an abstracted tree—layers of activity and history giving witness to Willis’s search to find vital force in his subject matter. There’s something almost scary about this painting which Willis acknowledges with the title “Who’s Afraid of the Dark.”

It’s actually quite unnerving to think that nature is alive and aware of us and that humans are by no means in control. Gary Irby succinctly calls up the creepy feeling of an animal watching from the shadows with the piercing eyes and bristling sticks of his sculpture “Nature’s Watching.” But even more powerfully, this work mischievously prods at the sense of guilt and looming doom that lurks in all of us in these days of runaway fossil fuel extraction, snowballing pollution and escalating climate change.

You might think that art and poetry about earth stewardship would tend to scold our profligate ways—or weep over them, but few of the works in this show could be classified as “protest art.” The closest are Irby’s “Nature’s Watching” and his ceramic pot with two talking heads conspicuously facing in opposite directions with the title “Discussing Selling our Environment.” Also in the running is Rebecca Clark’s “Oblivion” with its beach-goer blandly cocooned behind sunglasses and earbuds, oblivious to the devastations of storm and fire raging behind her.

Most of the show’s works are focused on exploring and celebrating the breadth of the subject: earth and its ecology. There are whales, domestic birds, wild birds, wild animals (deer, lions, elephants), insects, Eastern Shore waterscapes, and Antarctic ice. There is the vastness of huge clouded skies and the intimacy of a ladybug stalking aphids on a fragile flower.

Curiously, with the exception of Anita Kusick’s lush fields of flowers in “Gathering (Pike Farms – Conserved by Peconic Land Trust),” none of the works are about farming. Farmers are the principle stewards of land on the Eastern Shore, and it’s heartening to see more and more of them transitioning their land to organic from “conventional” farming (that is, planting Roundup-ready GMO crops managed with glyphosate and other chemicals). Likewise, it’s cheering to witness the widespread use of cover crops and forested shorelines to keep farm runoff out of waterways and to note the reintroduction of diverse crops and animal husbandry. Supported by a host of government programs, farmers are making a difference, as are hunters and organizations such as Ducks Unlimited that work to reestablish healthy habitats for wildlife.

“Nature’s Watching” by Gary Irby

In the call for submissions, we said “Art should bristle with energy and keep tugging at your thoughts.” It’s only when art has this kind of power to stimulate thought and encourage further investigation that it can trigger change for the better. The sense of childlike wonder that so many of these poems and artworks evoke is crucial in reshaping of our attitudes, and the edgy sense of danger in several of them acts as a much-needed spur to work for sustainable ways to live harmoniously with our earth.

If we fail in this, it’s serious. Life on earth will likely continue, though predications are that numerous species, including humans, will have disappeared and insects will be dominant. Quilter Christine Kamon chose to accompany her graceful “Dragonflies” with a quote from writer and artist Clive Barker that posits an idyllic future time when all traces of humans and our activities will be long gone and dragonflies and hummingbirds will flit in a golden afternoon. It’s a beautiful scene but one we’d like to postpone as long as possible.

Mary McCoy is an artist and writer who has the good fortune to live beside an old steamboat wharf on the Chester River. She is a former art critic for the Washington Post and several art publications. She enjoys kayaking the river and walking her family farm where she collects ideas and materials for the environmental art she creates, often in collaboration with her husband Howard. They have exhibited their work in the U.S., Ireland, Wales and New Zealand.

Recommended reading:
David Abram’s Becoming Animal
David Hinton’s Hunger Mountain
Andy Goldsworthy’s Time

 

Exhibition Dates: April 4 – 25
RiverArts 
315 High Street, Suite 106
Chestertown, MD 21620 United States

Academy Art Museum Announces May Events

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Joan Miró, (1893 – 1983), Oiseau Zéphyr, Color lithograph, 1960, AAM 2015.030.

EXHIBITIONS

The Academy Art Museum’s exhibitions are generously supported by the Maryland State Arts Council, the Talbot County Arts Council and the Star-Democrat. Free Docent Tours are every Wednesday at 11 a.m. for all exhibitions.

AAM @ 60: The Diamond Exhibition
Part I April 21–July 8, 2018, Members’ Reception: Friday, April 20, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
In 1958, the Academy Art Museum opened its doors to the public as the Academy of the Arts. In 2018 the Museum invites all audiences to celebrate its 60th anniversary, honoring the past and celebrating the future. Program highlights include a special two-part Diamond Exhibition, representing the creative genius of artists from Europe and the United States, spanning from the seventeenth century to the present. The AAM @ 60: The Diamond Exhibition will showcase a representative range of treasures and Picasso, and selections of its holdings in other media, including painting, photography and sculpture. AAM @ 60: The Diamond Exhibition will be accompanied by a special anniversary catalogue.

Michael Joseph, A-lister & Sherie, 2016 (detail) W, Archival pigment print.

New Photography: National Juried Exhibition
April 14 – July 15, 2018
Saturday, April 28, 3-4:30 p.m. – Awards Ceremony with Juror Sarah Stolfa
Photographic artists of all walks have submitted their latest works to a new national juried show at the Academy Art Museum in Easton, MD. The exhibition aims to highlight the current state of photography across a broad spectrum. Artists may submit all types of photographic works including digital, analog, alternative processes, etc.

Elizabeth Casqueiro: Entrances and Exits
April 14 –July 15, 2018
May 4, 5:30 p.m. – Artist talk on First Friday
Elizabeth Casqueiro is a visual artist who was born in England and grew up in Portugal, studying art at St. Martin’s College of Art in London, the Corcoran School of Art, and the Washington Studio School. Her work is an exploration of masked identity and taps into the playful and entertaining origins of identity through a series of works involving the action hero, the stage actor, and what she calls “the cheesy plot.” Following her fall solo gallery show in Portugal (2017), the Academy Art Museum is offering her a first solo museum exhibition in the United States.

LECTURES

Elizabeth Casqueiro, Do Something Batman, 2017 Acrylic and oil on canvas, Collection of the Artist.

Kittredge-Wilson Lecture Series
These lectures feature an exciting array of speakers who impart a diversity of perspectives on subjects such as art, architecture, history and literature.
Cost: $24 Members, Non-members $29. Pre-registration is suggested. Register online at academyartmuseum.org.

Painting for Princes: Dutch Art by Jan Baptist Weenix and Jan Weenix and book signing
Anke Van Wagenberg Senior Curator, Academy Art Museum
Friday, May 18, 2018, 6 p.m.
Anke Van Wagenberg will discuss paintings of Jan Baptist Weenix and his son Jan Weenix. These important Dutch masters and contemporaries of Rembrandt painted Italianate landscapes, portraits and still lifes. She recently finished the monographs on the father-and-son team with c. 500 entries. She is currently working on the Weenix drawings.

ARTS EXPRESS TRIPS

Anke Van Wagenberg Senior Curator, Academy Art Museum

Longwood Gardens
Tuesday, May 8
Cost: $75 Members $90 Non-members (includes admission)
One of the world’s great gardens, Longwood’s story is one of legacy, innovation, and stewardship.
Longwood Gardens are a living expression of all that the founder, Pierre S. du Pont, found inspiring, meaningful, and beautiful. From the intricate fountain systems to the meticulous gardens to the architectural grandeur, awe-inspiring discoveries await at every turn.

ADULT CLASSES

Exploration into Intaglio Printmaking with Rosemary Cooley
Instructor: Rosemary Cooley
3-Day Workshop – May 4, 5 & 6, 2018, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Cost: $185 Members, $220 Non-members (An additional $35 materials fee paid to the instructor and includes archival paper, plates, use of studio tools and inks as well as one archival mat.)
Students will learn how to prepare film positives of their artwork, which may then be later exposed onto light sensitive photo emulsion coated steel plates, known as Solarplates. Suitable artwork includes ink wash drawings, charcoal, pen and ink drawings, photographs, and other non-copyrighted images. Everyone is welcome to see the possibilities of this interesting process. Students will examine various film positives, which they may make themselves at a copy shop onto acetate sheets, and then will bring them to class to develop the images and print them on the etching presses in the new Printmaking Studio at AAM. This workshop is for the serious printmaker, and the results will be very exciting.

Longwood Gardens

Summer Mosaic Workshops for Adults and Teens
Instructor: Sheryl Southwick
2-Day Workshops: All are on Wednesdays and Thursdays
May 23 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. and May 24 from 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
June 13 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. and June 14 from 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
July 11 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. and July 12 from 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Cost: $75 Members per each 2-day workshop), $90 Non- members (plus $5 materials fee paid to instructor)
Students will learn the basics of mosaics: breaking and cutting glass and pottery, applying shards to a wooden surface with adhesives, applying grout. At the end of each workshop, the students will have a beautiful mosaic piece to take home. Goggles and gloves will be used to protect eyes and hands. Materials needed: All essential materials and tools will be provided. Students may bring in broken or chipped china or pottery and any special objects, like old jewelry. Bring a lunch.
Minimum for class is 6 and maximum is 10.

Sheryl Southwick

Paint Along with Diane and Sheryl
Mentors: Diane DuBois Mullaly and Sheryl Southwick
3 days: May 29-31
Tuesday – Thursday, 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Cost $95 Members, $114 Non-members
Diane and Sheryl invite all painters in any medium to paint along with them during this unique mentored outdoor painting experience. Each day the group meets at a different fabulous private property, where everyone picks a spot and starts painting. Diane and Sheryl will make rounds to each painter’s easel throughout the morning to make suggestions and give advice. They will also be painting. At about noon, the group will have lunch together, while Sheryl and Diane lead a constructive group critique of the paintings from that day. In the event of heavy rain, the group will paint indoors. Painters will find inspiration, grow their skills, and enjoy great group camaraderie – a special experience not to be missed! Bring a bag lunch except the last day, lunch is on us! www.dianeduboismullaly.com, www.sherylsouthwick.com. Minimum 10, Maximum 25.

CHILDRENS’ CLASSES

Mini Masters Academy
Mini Masters is an art-based, early enrichment program for two to four-year old children. Flexible enrollment days are offered from September through May, Monday through Thursdays, 9 a.m. to 12:00, with optional extended day until 2 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Email jhendricks@academyartmuseum.org for information and availability.

PERFORMING ARTS CLASSES

Piano & Guitar Lessons
Instructor: Raymond Remesch
Contact Instructor for further information at (410) 829-0335 or rayremesch@gmail.com
Whether your goal is to audition for a conservatory, lead your family in song during the holidays, or learn to play the music you love, a personalized music education is one of the most rewarding and enduring investments people can make for themselves or their child.

Voice Lessons
Instructor: Georgiann Gibson
Contact instructor for information at (410) 829-2525 or georgiann@atlanticbb.net.
Whether you are interested in singing with a choir, becoming a soloist, getting a lead in the high school musical or community theatre production, joining a barbershop quartet, or preparing your audition for a conservatory, good singing requires a skill set that is developed over time.

Ballroom and Latin Dance
Instructor: Amanda Showell
Contact instructor for information at (302) 377-3088 or visit dancingontheshore.com.

For additional information, visit academyartmuseum.org or call the Museum at 410-822-2787.