Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra Celebrates Holiday Season

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The only professional symphony orchestra on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, the Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra (MSO), is celebrating 20 years of bringing enchantment to audiences from Ocean City, MD to Wye Mills, MD.

Audiences can ring in the holiday season with “Holiday Joy,” in early December celebrating the spirit of the holidays with traditional seasonal favorites. The concerts will be held on Thursday, December 7, 2017 at 7 p.m. at the Avalon Theater in Easton, MD; Saturday, December 9, 2017 at 3 p.m. at the Mariner’s Bethel in Ocean View, DE; and Sunday, December 10, 2017 at 3 p.m. at the Community Church in Ocean Pines, MD. The concerts will feature such favorites as “Sleighride,” selections from Handel’s “Messiah,” Wendel’s “Hanukah Overture,” and selections from Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker,” as well as familiar carols and hymns. Soloists include Leah Hawkins, Soprano; Joe Burgstaller, Trumpet; and Chaz’man Williams-Ali, Tenor.

Pictured are soloists for the Mid-Atlantic Symphony’s “Toast to the New Year” concerts: Sharin Apostolou, Soprano and Ryan McPherson, Tenor.

The orchestra’s “Toast to the New Year” will celebrate the New Year with revelry and music on both New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day. The concerts will be held on Sunday, December 31, 2017 at 7 p.m. at Christ Church in Easton, MD; Monday, January 1, 2018 at 1 p.m. at the Community Church in Ocean Pines, MD. The concerts will feature such compositions as Fledermaus Overture, Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake – Second Movement, 2nd; a duet from “West Side Story,”  “Nocturne from a Midsummer Night’s Dream,” along with an “Auld Lang Syne” sing-along. Soloists include Sharin Apostolou, Soprano and Ryan McPherson, Tenor.

The Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra is supported in part by the Maryland State Arts Council, the Talbot County Arts Council, the Worcester County Arts Council, Sussex County, Delaware and the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore, Inc.

Tickets to the MSO concerts are available online at midatlanticsymphony.org or by telephone (888) 846-8600.  For further information, visit midatlanticsymphony.org.

Chesapeake Music Expands Musical Offerings on Mid Shore

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Chesapeake Music is on the move, expanding its offerings in new and exciting ways.  The organization was renamed in 2015 to better reflect its overall focus of being a source for live performing arts with year-round concerts. In addition to individual concerts, Chesapeake Music exports something of the Chesapeake’s uniqueness to audiences and to musicians worldwide who take part in its annual Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival every June, the Monty Alexander Jazz Festival every Labor Day weekend, a biennial international Chesapeake Chamber Music Competition, and the new Jazz on the Chesapeake concert series. Chesapeake Music’s YouthReach Program works with area schools to bring a greater exposure of classical and jazz music to area students and its First Strings Program continues to inspire and excite 3rd and 4th graders in area schools by introducing them to the violin.

According to Courtney Kane, President of Chesapeake Music, who moved to Easton with her husband Scott from Chevy Chase, MD in 2010, “What astonished me was the quality of music the organization provides – internationally-recognized musicians performing here on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. The quality has to do with the recognition of the performers who come here. They play in the great halls of music around the world.”

Courtney Kane, President of Chesapeake Music

A number of renowned musicians have graced the stages of Chesapeake Music’s concerts and festivals. Among them are Kim Kashkashian, violist, who performs regularly at Chesapeake Music’s Chamber Music Festival each year. She received a Grammy Award in 2012 for Best Classical Solo Instrumental and in 2016 was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Another talented performer at Chesapeake Music’s Monty Alexander Jazz Festival is vocalist René Marie, who in both 2013 and 2017 had Grammy nominated songs.

Kane, who was born and raised in New Orleans, home of Mardi Gras, Dixieland Jazz and Creole cooking, grew up loving music. Her mother took her children to the symphony programs for children, introducing them to classical music. In addition, her exposure to Dixieland led her to her love of jazz music. Kane comments, “The city has a musical background. I thought living there that what we had was what everyone had.”

Kane, who enjoyed a long career in information technology sales management with IBM and Digital Equipment (DEC), also has managed individual VIP tours in France and for a time lectured on Impressionist art on riverboat tours on the Seine and Rhone rivers. She adds, “It was happenstance that we met friends who were active in Chesapeake Chamber Music. I got involved with it and the more involved I got, the more attached I got. I served as the Gala Chair and Treasurer before becoming Board President in 2016.”

Chesapeake Music is dependent on its volunteers, sponsors, donors, and committed supporters. The organization is always looking for volunteers with experience. Kane comments, “Arts volunteers are about passion. It takes faith and money to grow an arts organization. We have a rich source of volunteers in the communities we serve, but with our expanded offerings, we are always looking for new volunteers.”

In addition to its volunteers, what is unique about Chesapeake Music is the intimacy of its venues. Easton’s vibrant arts community lends itself well to the concerts we provide. These small halls, like the Academy Art Museum, The Avalon Theatre, and local churches, enable the audience to sit a few feet from the performers to take in the concert. Kane credits Executive Director Don Buxton who knows and works with every outstanding production technician within a day’s drive. She adds, “Our promise is to give our audience reliably the best in live performances, delivered locally, and at a reasonable cost. What we hope is that you will make an occasion of every event.”

The organization’s growth began when the annual Chamber Music Festival grew from a one-day festival in 1985 into a two-week event held in early June each year. Today, the Festival includes 13 concerts, recitals and open rehearsals in venues ranging from concert halls to churches, museums and waterfront estates. In 1997, the Festival established the concept of a satellite concert outside its base in Talbot County. Satellite concerts have been held in Oxford, St. Michaels, and more recently Queenstown.

In 2002, the organization expanded its operation to include the Chesapeake Chamber Music Competition, a competition for young emerging chamber music ensembles. In 2004, the first biennial Competition became international in scope, drawing from international conservatories. In 2006, the organization was approached by musician Merideth Buxton, Don Buxton’s wife, to create an outreach program, now institutionalized as First Strings. The short-term goals of First Strings Program are to help elementary school students in third or fourth grade to improve listening, gain self-confidence in performing, use teamwork to exhibit cooperation and self-control, and to have fun while learning the skills needed to play the violin. The program also offers YouthReach concerts featuring world-class musicians demonstrating and discussing their instruments with young musicians.

In July 2008, Eastern Shore Chamber Music Festival became Chesapeake Chamber Music, Inc., to better reflect the organization’s geographic location and scope near the Chesapeake Bay. That same year, Executive Director Don Buxton attended the Chamber Music America’s Annual Meeting in New York City where jazz had been a regular part of the programming.  After discussing the idea among board members about introducing jazz to the organization’s repertory, the following year, in 2009, Chesapeake Chamber Music offered a single concert featuring the renowned jazz pianist Monty Alexander and his trio to test the waters. Since then, that one concert has grown into the Monty Alexander Jazz Festival, featuring seven jazz events over Labor Day weekend each year, and drawing enthusiastic audiences from throughout the region. Most recently, Jazz on the Chesapeake expanded its programs by creating a jazz concert series to be held throughout the calendar year.

Kane reflects, “As we look to our future, our new name reflects the vision of Chesapeake Music – to continue to grow as the premier provider of professional live music performances. We continue to look for ways to be relevant in our diverse community.” She adds, “In the future, we plan to keep our programming fresh with new artists coming every year. We are planning farther out with our events. We also continue to collaborate with the Talbot County Arts Council and other organizations, as we are doing this year with our Artists-in-Residence program with the local schools.”

Chesapeake Music’s upcoming international Chamber Music Competition in April is one of the best competitions for young musicians in the world. Many great artists’ careers have been launched after receiving awards at the Competition, like the Harlem Quartet, who won the Grammy for Best Instrumental Composition in 2013, along with The Calidore String Quartet, who received the 2017 Lincoln Center Emerging Artists Award.

For further information about Chesapeake Music and upcoming events, visit chesapeakemusic.org or call 410-819-0380.

Spotlight on Evie Baskin and the Artists’ Gallery

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You may have stopped and looked at the display window of the Artists’ Gallery as you’ve walked down High Street. It’s the little shop past the Music Life store and just before the White Swan Tavern as you head toward the river. This month, you’ll be struck with a couple of familiar faces looking out at you —  pianist Phil Dutton and bookstore owner Tom Martin, as captured by local artist Evie Baskin.

Gretchen Hoffecker Knowles with Lizzie      Portrait by Evie Baskin

Be sure to go inside to get a look at  the other works that are part of “Passion” – a new series of portraits by Baskin – on display at the gallery along with the works of of several other local and national artists.  The exhibit will be up through the end of the year, although in December the display window will be taken over by the gallery’s Annual Artisan Sale, which will feature a delightful array of arts and crafts, all available for purchase.

“Passion” is Evie’s fifth portrait series since she arrived on the Eastern Shore in 2008.   The portraits’ subjects are all people who live on the Eastern Shore and who are following their passions and by doing so, provide inspiration to us all.  A statement posted on the wall adjacent to each portrait, describes the passion of each person, providing both a visual and literary element to this show.  The portraits have an exuberant style that combines a soft painterly approach with near photo realism and beautifully expresses the joie de vivre the subjects clearly have for their particular passion. Among the subjects are poet Robert Earl Price, horsewoman Gretchen Knowles, and others.

Artist Evie Baskin next to her portrait of local resident Jim Barry.

Evie was born and raised in Jacksonville, Florida and has a BA in Visual Arts from Florida State University.  After relocating to Alexandria, Virginia in 1999, she studied figurative work in oil with Danni Dawson and Robert Liberace at the Torpedo Factory.  When she moved to the Eastern Shore, Evie began working with pastel, studying at various times with Mary Pritchard, Claudia Post and William Schneider.  She has garnered numerous awards over the years for her work in pastel and oil and is a partner with The Artists’ Gallery, a member of the Maryland Portrait Society, The Working Artists Forum, and RiverArts of Chestertown.

 

Robert Earl Price, poet and playwright, teaches at Washington College      Portrait by Evie Baskin

Sandra Willett Jackson           Portrait by Evie Baskin

In addition to Baskin’s “Passion” exhibit, the works of several other artists are on the gallery walls through December, including the special window display of crafts and jewelry. Bonnie Foster Howell,  a partner in the gallery, has hung several of her maritime paintings, all of them showing a beautiful mastery of  light on water.  Jonathan Shaw’s wildlife paintings have exquisite detail, feathers that seem about to flutter as the bird takes wing.  The landscapes by Nancy Thomas, another partner in the gallery, shine with autumnal colors,  while Jeanne Saulsbury paintings brings out the beauty of such everyday objects as cans and cars. There is much to admire in the variety of styles and subjects in this exhibit.

Painting by Bonnie Foster Howell

Painting by Bonnie Foster Howell

 

The Artists’ Gallery is a cooperative effort of five local artists. In addition to Baskin, the partners are Sally Clark, Bonnie Foster Howell, Nancy Thomas and Barbara Zuehlke. The gallery shows the partners’ work on a continuing basis, with additional displays by other prominent regional and national artists.

The Artists’ Gallery is located at 239 High Street in Chesterton, and is open Tuesday- Saturday from 10-5 and Sundays from 12:30-4:30.  It will be closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas days.  Call  410-778-2425 or check the website for any other closings or extended holiday hours. For  information about the gallery and Evie’s work, please see www.theartistsgalleryctown.com or www.eviebaskin.com.

See photo gallery below for more works by Evie Baskin and the other artists currently exhibiting at the Artists’ Gallery.  Photos by Evie Baskin, Jane Jewell, and Peter Heck

Helga Orrick, 93 years young with a passion for yoga       Portrait by Evie Baskin

Art by Jeanne Saulsbury at the Artists’ Gallery through December 2017

 

Art by Jeanne Saulsbury at the Artists’ Gallery through Decembe

Jim Barry        Portrait by Evie Baskin

Jim Barry – Portrait by Evie Baskin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paintings by Nancy R. Thomas at the Artists’ Gallery

“Frozen in Time” encaustic /oil on panel by Bonnie Howell

Artists’ Gallery on High St.

Even the refreshments table is artistically arranged at the Artists’ Gallery First Friday openings.

Everyone has a good time at the Artists’ Gallery!

Paintings of Sailing Ships by Steve Bleinberger

Metal Scuplture of Mahi Mahi Fish by Rob Forrester

Art by Mary Ellen Mabe at Artists’ Gallery

Bonnie Foster Howell in front of her maritime paintings.

Jane Welsh, Executive director of the Kent County Humane Society        Portrait by Evie Baskin

Wildlife paintings by Jonathan Shaw at the Artists’ Gallery

Philip Dutton, pianist and founder/leader of the band The Alligators          Portrait by Evie Baskin

 

 

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Play It Again — at Garfield Center

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Come and celebrate the 75th Anniversary of one of the all-time great films at the Garfield Center!

In 1943, “Casablanca” won three Academy Awards, including the Oscar for Best Picture. Today, 75 years after its release, the film is still considered a classic.

On Warner Bros. back lot in Burbank on May 25, 1942, the first day of shooting for the new film “Casablanca,” the production schedule called actors Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and Dooley Wilson to the set at 9 a.m. to shoot a flashback scene set in Paris, where the romance between Rick and Ilsa began.

Seventy-five years later, the film has reportedly been screened more times in theaters and on television than any movie in history.

On Saturday, November 25, come to the Garfield Center for the Arts at 7 p.m. for a special 75th anniversary celebration of the film. The event is FREE with donations to the Garfield encouraged. The Garfield Center for the Arts is located at 210 High Street in Chestertown and can be reached at 410-810-2060.

Delmarva Review: Nursing 101 by Margaret Adams

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It was getting easier, touching strangers. Still, I hovered for a moment in the doorway of the hospital room, pausing before jumping into the pool of their personal space.

It continued to amaze me, after two months, how willing the sick were to let themselves be touched. Their abdomens palpated, their gums examined; the undersides of their feet inspected, repositioned, unwrapped and rewrapped in socks. I’m just going to check your capillary refill, you said, and then they let you pinch and prod them, quiet, supplicant. It felt so intrusive to even ask, and then shocking to gain such easy entry. May I take your blood pressure now? If it’s alright with you, I’d like to listen to your lungs.

The navy blue school uniform scrubs, embroidered at the shoulder with the name and seal of my nursing school, were the same shade as those the nurses wore at this hospi- tal. Between that and the stethoscope draped proprietarily around my neck, it was hard for the patients to know that I was a student. When I’d purchased those scrubs, their pressed and professional folds had impressed me with their aura of importance; I had tried them on at home in the eve- ning, turning and admiring my reflection. Once inside the hospital, though, on my first clinical rotation, I wished for something less assuming. Colorful cartoon scrubs, the kind of thing that patients automatically took less seriously. Too often patients asked me questions, trustingly, as if I would know the correct answers for them right away.

The hospital has its own noisy, constant cadence. The rhythm is marked by beeping IVs, thrumming respirators, shouted questions to the hard of hearing and hollered announcements across the nurses’ station. It’s constantly in the nurses neither sit, nor eat, nor step out to use the bathroom. It’s not a place where a nursing student, uncertain of herself, can wait, poised at a doorway, for too long.

I walked into the room. “Hello, Mrs. Douglas,” I said. “How are you feeling? Can I get you anything?” And, with her open eye contact and assent, I laid my hands on her wrist, carefully curving my fingers around the line of her pulse. She turned her head towards my shoulder and sighed as I counted the surges of blood beating through her fragile, small-boned arm, watching the movement of her breath in her chest. One, two, three, four…

A first-semester nursing student knows few things. We cannot administer medication, or yet be counted upon to make assessments on our own. What we can do is give bed baths, change beds, hold hands and steady elbows; we can listen, take vitals, and we can try not to get in the way. I was learning, slowly, to get beyond my own self-absorption and my preoccupation with what these ill people, the patients I was here to help, thought of me. The constant worry and consideration—Can they tell how uncomfortable, how new I am? Am I irritating them? None of it really mattered. No one cared who I was, whether or not I looked or acted like what they expected, if my hand shook or fumbled with the washcloths. They just cared about getting clean, about feeling better. A task I would have thought myself incapable of—brushing an old woman’s teeth—was accomplished when the reality of her need surmounted my awkwardness. It was humbling to do it, and horrifying to realize how such actions were carried out every day, roughly, by people hardened to it by routine.

I was halfway through administering my second bed bath ever when my patient, a woman whose body was swollen beyond recognition and covered with open sores, began to cry. “Have I hurt you?” I asked, horrified. “Are you okay?”

“No, sweetheart,” she said. “It’s just that no one has taken the time to give me this thorough of a bath in weeks.”

On our breaks, we students talk about what we’ve been allowed to do, or what interesting procedures we’ve seen. We mark our time here by how tough our stomachs get, by how many IVs we’ve been permitted to change. We talk a little about the people, about the fact that now, as students, we have the time to do things for patients that we will never
have time to do as professionals, but not that much.

“How was your clinical?” classmates assigned to other hospitals asked me. “Did you get to see anything cool?”

I talked to a senile woman’s stuffed animal for her, I thought. I put water in a dish for it so it wouldn’t get thirsty. She was grateful. “Fine,” I said instead. “I saw a stage 4wound…you could see the bone.”

On mornings when I have clinical I get up at 4:30, giving me a full hour to drink my coffee before going in to the hospital. I need that time to wake up, to get on my A-game before walking into this other world where the macabre is embraced intellectually and where the iron gates of intimacy are as malleable as tinfoil. I meet my carpool on the pre- dawn corner of my city street and arrive at the hospital just in time for morning report.

“Who has bed 142? Find me when you’re ready for the hand-off. Jane? I’ve got bed 147. Is that my coffee?”

The night shift briefs the day shift RNs on how things have gone during the night. Bed 143 is refusing to eat anything…bed 145 is overdue for her medication, I didn’t get to it in time. They speak of the patients by number, rather than name, identifying them in the corners of their notes with abbreviations: J.D., 87 y/o WF.

I was assigned Mr. Jones that day. An easy, interesting patient, my instructor told me, an elderly man with heart problems who didn’t throw things or swear. I read the front pages of his chart through twice, quickly, before going to introduce myself.

He was missing a large piece of his face, from the left side of his upper lip towards his nose, disappearing under a large, frayed bandage that covered a four-inch swath below his eyes. The bandage was old and ratty-looking; dried blood crusted around its edges. He held a napkin spotted with fresh blood up to it thoughtfully, dabbing at it. I smiled my brightest, most winning smile and made a hasty retreat.

“What? His face is half gone? She didn’t tell us that during the morning report. Oh, the skin cancer surgery he had done before the angina started. Well, let’s go in and have a look.” My preceptor Jen, a tall, sturdy woman with intri- cate braids woven around her head, gave a low whistle as she examined his bandages. “What happened here?” she asked.

“I’ve been picking at it,” he said, matter-of-factly.

“You really shouldn’t do that. We’re going to have to put you in mittens,” she said.

“Yes. I know.”

“How long ago was your surgery?” she asked, scanning his chart.

“Last week,” he said.

“It says here you had this surgery over the summer,” she said. “Can you tell me what month it is, Mr. Jones?”

“July.” “Do you remember Thanksgiving?”

“No…maybe…why?”

“It’s December, Mr. Jones.” She snapped a pair of gloves on and began inspecting his bandage with careful fingers. “Can you tell me how long this has been bleeding?” she asked.

“Um…no…an hour? I’m not sure,” he said.

“Okay. I’m going to go get some new gauze to help fix this up a little. I’ll be right back.”

Alone in the room with him, I felt that familiar sense of being at a loss. He held up the blood spotted napkin, looking at it with a perplexed expression on his face. “Is this a
clock?” he asked me.

“No,” I said. “It’s a napkin.”

“Oh. I was hoping it would have the time on it so I could tell her how long I had been bleeding.”

Jen came back in with the gauze, putting on a fresh pair of gloves, and I busied myself with my own pair. “Here, Meg,” she said. “Hold this.” I handed her supplies and stead- ied his chin for her as she reworked his bandage. “I’m going to put mittens on you if you can’t stop picking at this,” she said.

“You’d better,” he said, placidly. “I like picking at it.”

A young man in a transport team polo shirt with thin wrists and a spotty face stuck his head in the door. “Almost ready, Jen?” he asked.

“Yep, he’ll be ready to go in a minute.”

“Is that my dad?” Mr. Jones asked. “My father is coming to see me today.”

“No,” the nurse said. “That’s the transport team, getting ready to take you down the hall for that test today. Do you remember?”

“Oh,” he said. “Well, if my parents come in while I’m gone, please tell them I’ll be back soon. They’re coming to visit me today.”

“How old are your parents?” she asked, giving him a considering look. I glanced at his birth date again on the chart and read May 24, 1925.

“He’s 80, I think…and she’s 82,” he replied.

“Well. Breakfast should be here when you come back,” she told him. “We’ll see you soon.”

I stripped off of my gloves the way I’d been taught to, balling the first one up into the second one like a package, and washed my hands for the full 30 seconds before sweep- ing the extra gauze off of the counter and stuffing it into my pockets.

This wasn’t the work that I had decided to go to nursing school to do. I wanted to be abroad, helping with the International Red Cross, Doctors without Borders, tending to refugees in desert field camps. I wanted to be in the rural recesses of the U.S., delivering primary care to migrant workers in the fields and to children in the mountains of Appalachia. I was on track to become a Nurse Practitioner, a job granted a greater measure of autonomy and respect than the RNs who run the hospital ever received for their pains. Still, I knew I needed to learn this: needed to spend my time in the trenches, in the blue-collar, work-a-day world of medications, IVs, of calling doctors by their last names and nurses by their firsts. I had wanted a trade, the capability of learned hands, and this was the apprenticeship, the oil-changing days that come before craftsmanship. But I hated the hospital, hated the disease we spread and the discord we encouraged, the assembly-line feel of being part of a big-box health dispensary.

Our preceptors made a production of granting us a lunch break, refusing our offers to bring food back from the cafeteria for them. “I’ll eat something in an hour or two,” they insisted, making sure that we knew that they were lying.

I step out of the smells of latex and iodine and into the cold December air to call my mother.

“How’s it going?” she asks.

“Okay,” I say.

“Yeah?”

“One of my patients thinks that his parents are coming to visit him today. He’s really looking forward to it. He’s in his 80s and there’s no way they’re still alive.”

“Oh….”

“He keeps saying that they’re coming to see him soon.” “Maybe they are…just, from the other side.”

“Wow. Thanks, Mom, for making this even grimmer than it already is.”

“It’s not grim. It’s…I mean, everyone wants their parents at the end of their lives.”

“Yeah. I just don’t know what to say. The nurse is just avoiding engaging with it. I don’t want to tell him that they’re dead, but I don’t want to lie to him, either.”

“Does it matter?”

“I don’t know. Would it matter to you?”

“I don’t know.”

The names of illnesses, the rounds of medication, are still a foreign world to me: GERD, synthroid, albuminemia. Diverticulitis. It sounds like the Spanish verb for enjoying oneself, divertir, a relic of the world of my previous degree in Hispanic language and culture. Divierto, diviertes, diver- timos, diverticulitis. Except that all I do know about diverticulitis is that it isn’t fun.

The patients are subject and object, listened to and talked at. Compassion sits on one side of a perfectly balanced scale, with sleep, coffee, food, and workload on the other—the needs of the nurses, stretched to the limits by an institution which is necessarily economically driven, not the needs of their patients, define the extent of care.

“I feel like a waitress,” one nurse confessed to me.

“I feel like Atlas,” says another. “With a whole hospital on my shoulders.”

I’m a half-hour from the end of my shift when an alarm breaks through the usual cacophony of bells and shouts. Someone has called a Code Blue. I freeze, panicking, and then remember my instructor’s words about what I should do in an emergency and flatten myself against the wall. More nurses and doctors than I have seen all day boil out and into the hall. “Grab the crash cart,” one yells. “Bed 143, no pulse, no respirations.” Security runs past me, open- ing the elevator doors and holding them open so that the pa- tient, if resuscitated, can be rushed immediately to intensive care. The madness coalesces around the patient’s room and I hear the unmistakable sounds of two-person CPR, accompanied by the inevitable crack of breaking ribs.

It’s over quickly—the patient is packed neatly into the metal square of the elevator, accompanied by three sweaty but otherwise calm-looking RNs. I feel like the sudden reminder of what is happening here has swept my feet out from under me. We’re serving medicine, not burgers. We’re trafficking in lives. The cause of pit stains under my arms, a brief adrenaline rush, was someone else’s everything. Knowing that can’t be thrown in the laundry and washed away. It can’t be comprehended. I hope that I don’t get used to it, but I can’t deny that getting used to it might be the only way I will get by here.

I go into see Mr. Jones one last time before I leave the unit for the day. Fresh bandages cover the hole in the middle of his face, still bloody on the edges but less frayed. “Can I get you anything?” I ask.

“Could you bring me some water?”

“Sure.” I grab a fresh cup and a straw, open the tap, and watch as the clear liquid fills the Styrofoam container. I place it on the tray by his hand and he brings it to his mouth. Just enough of his lip is missing that the suction of mouth around straw is incomplete, and the straw rattles with each suck.

Here,” I say, taking the cup and cutting out part of the lid to make it an improvised sippy-cup instead. He nods with approval, drinking deeply before leaning back against his pillows.

“My parents are coming to see me this afternoon,” he says.

I pause, and then smile. “They must love you an awful lot,” I say simply.

“Yes…they do.”

I closed the door behind me.

Margaret Adams’s “Nursing 101” was published in Volume 4 of the Delmarva Review when she was a student in the Johns Hopkins University nursing and public health program. She is now a family nurse practitioner in Seattle, WA. A former columnist for The Bangor Daily News and a Pushcart Prize nominee, her essays and fiction have also appeared in The Portland Review, Baltimore Review, Bellingham Review, and Pinch.

The Delmarva Review is a nonprofit literary journal in partnership with the Spy that publishes compelling new poetry, fiction and nonfiction from writers within the region and beyond. It will celebrate its Tenth Anniversary edition in November. The Review is supported by individual contributions, the Eastern Shore Writers Association, and a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council with funds from the Maryland State Arts Council. For more information, please visit: www.delmarvareview.com

Christ Church to Host Annapolis Chamber Ensemble and Two World-Class Pianists

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The Christ Church Concert Series in Easton continues its 2017-18 season this Sunday afternoon at 4 pm featuring the Annapolis Chamber Players.  The ensemble whose members have been collaborating for more than fifteen years is composed of some of the finest musicians in the Baltimore-Washington DC area.  Known for their eclectic programs with repertoire ranging from the eighteenth through the twenty-first centuries, the ensemble specializes in mixed chamber music for winds, strings, and piano. Unlike homogeneous chamber groups, such as a string quartet or woodwind quintet, the Annapolis Chamber Players’ diverse instrumental colors and flexible instrumentation offers a variety of musical colors and styles.

Woobin Park and Stefan Petrov

While all six of the ensemble’s members unite to amass a most impressive cache of honors and distinctions, its two pianists, each a world-class talent, will perform on Sunday’s concert. Dr. Woobin Park made her Carnegie Hall debut in 2010 to critical acclaim. The New York Concert Review raved“…Park gave a brilliant performance, handling the virtuosity with beautiful sense of style…” She has appeared throughout the United States and South Korea in solo and chamber recitals as well as solo performances with orchestra. Park has performed in distinguished concert venues including Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, Steinway Hall in New York, Strathmore Hall in Washington D.C., Elizabeth Horowitz Performing Arts Center in Maryland, Tedmann Concert Hall in Minneapolis, Auer Concert Hall in Bloomington, Indiana and Preston Bradley Hall of the Chicago Cultural Center. Her live performances have been nationally broadcast on WFMT in Chicago and KSJN in Minneapolis. Woobin has earned prizes in several competitions including the Los Angeles Liszt International Piano Competition, where she was also awarded “Best Performance of the Required Work,” San Nicola di Bari International Piano Competition in Italy, University of Minnesota Concerto Competition, and American Protege International Competition of Romantic Music. On Sunday, Dr. Park will perform Carl Frühling’s Trio for Clarinet, Violoncello and Piano, Op. 40 with clarinetist and ensemble director, Phyllis Richardson and cellist Dorotea Racz.  In addition to her performing career and masterclasses throughout the country, Dr. Park serves on the piano faculty at Washington College.

American-Bulgarian pianist Stefan Petrov, whose arresting interpretations and broad musical versatility has captivated classical music audiences as a soloist and a chamber musician in venues across Europe, North America and the Caribbean, will perform Johannes Brahms’ Trio in E-flat Major for Piano, Violin and French, Op. 40 along with violinist Kristen Bakkegard and hornist, Heidi Brown. Mr. Petrov’s performances have been broadcast on CBC (Canada), WDAV(NC), WFMT (Chicago), WMRA(VA) and Bulgarian National TVand Radio. He has appeared in Steinway Hall (New York, NY), Steinway Series at the Smithsonian Museum (Washington D.C.), the Bulgarian National Palace of Culture, Teatro Nacional (Dominican Republic), Chicago Cultural Institute and others. Equally at home as a collaborative pianist, Stefan partners frequently with Israeli-American cellist Amit Peled in recitals across the U.S., while also serving as head of the collaborative piano department at the prestigious Heifetz International Music

Sunday’s concert is partially funded by a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council and the Maryland State Arts Council.  Doors open at 3:30 pm, and the public is invited.  A freewill offering will be received to support this and upcoming concerts.  Christ Church is located at 111 S. Harrison Street in downtown Easton. For information call 410-822-2677 or visit www.christchurcheaston.org.

Academy Art Museum Announces New Members Join Board of Trustees

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Catherine McCoy

The Museum recently welcomed the following new board members: Daniel Canzoniero of Easton, Craig L. Fuller of Easton, Jeffrey Huvelle of Royal Oak and Washington, DC, and Nanny Trippe of Easton to its Board of Trustees. In addition, outgoing board chair Carolyn Williams of Easton (2010–17) and board member Nancy Appleby (2011–17) of Bozman were honored for their contributions to the Museum’s Board.

Director Ben Simons comments, “Carolyn dedicated her heart and soul to the Museum, and steered it with wisdom, courage, and fortitude through a time of transition and revitalization. She has become a friend and an inspiration to me, as she has to so many. We also salute and thank outgoing Secretary Nancy Appleby, who formed a key part of the leadership during the same period. Carolyn and Nancy will be dearly missed, but of course remain beloved members of the Museum family.”

Cathy McCoy was elected Chair of the Museum’s Board of Trustees, replacing Williams. McCoy, a retired corporate and securities lawyer, enjoyed an over 25-year legal career in the corporate and securities law field, the first half on the staff of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the latter half as a partner in the law firm Arnold & Porter. She has been active in a number of local nonprofits, including serving as board president of the Oxford Community Center, before becoming a trustee of the Academy Art Museum in 2015.

Simons adds, “We welcome Cathy as Chair of the Board of Trustees. As we look ahead to an exciting year celebrating the Museum’s 60th Anniversary, the leadership and future of the Museum could hardly be more secure. I’m also delighted to welcome our new board members. Each brings deep experience and passion for the Museum’s mission and commitment to helping us reach our goals in the coming years.”

New board member Daniel Canzoniero of Easton is Chief Executive Officer of Gamse Lithographing Company, Inc., which produces labels and flexible packaging for food, beverage and other consumer products companies. He serves as a director of the World Trade Center Institute in Baltimore and the Avalon Foundation in Easton, as well as President of The Graphic Source, a buying co-operative of 44 member companies. He is a member of M&T Bank’s Directors’ Council, and active in the Washington, Baltimore and Palm Beach Chapters of Young Presidents Organization (YPO).

Pictured L-R are Ben Simons, Director of the Academy Art Museum with new members of the Museum’s Board of Trustees Nanny Trippe of Easton; Jeffrey Huvelle of Royal Oak and Washington, DC; Daniel Canzoniero of Easton; and Craig L. Fuller of Easton.

Craig L. Fuller of Easton is Chairman of The Fuller Company, a strategic consulting group he organized in 1989. Most recently, he served as the president and CEO of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Previously, Fuller served eight years in the White House, first as Assistant to President Reagan for Cabinet Affairs before becoming Chief of Staff to Vice President George H.W. Bush during the second term of the Reagan Administration.  Serving on boards and as an advisor to aviation companies, Fuller has been active in aviation policy matters including serving on the FAA’s Management Advisory Council. Craig served for 10 years as a Trustee of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and currently serves as a director of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Jeffrey Huvelle of Royal Oak and Washington, DC, is Senior Counsel with Covington & Burling LLP in Washington, DC. He is leading expert in Labor and Employment Law and has received outstanding achievement awards by the Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights and the Women’s Legal Defense Fund. He received his Juris Doctorate from Columbia Law School and his Bachelor’s Degree from Harvard College. He has served on the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and in the Peace Corps in Kenya. His civic activities have included being a Board Member, Assistant Commissioner and Coach for Stoddert Soccer in Washington, DC.

Nanny Trippe of Easton is a many-generation native of the Eastern Shore and owner of Trippe-Hilderbrandt Gallery in Easton, which exhibits the work of many fine award-winning artists in all mediums, as well as her own fine art photography. She completed a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Washington College. She has received numerous awards for her photography, including the 2009 Plein Air Easton Award Best in Show, the Best Black and White-Aubrey Bodine Award, 2nd Place 2012 Plein Air Easton Photography Competition, 2015 Photographers Forum: Finalist and published in “Best of Photography 2015.” The Academy Art Museum held solo exhibition of her works in 2016–17: Trees: Majesty and Mystery.

Illustrated Lecture: “Beyond Stereotypes: War, Warriors, and the Creative Arts”

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WarFront/HomeFront with new Kent Arts Building in background

The public is invited to an Illustrated Lecture this coming Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 2 p.m. at the Kent County Arts Council Gallery, 101 Spring Avenue, Chestertown, Maryland.

“Beyond Stereotypes: War, Warriors, and the Creative Arts” will be presented by Tara Tappert, Founder and Principal of The Arts & The Military; and, Michael D. Fay, Retired Combat Artist and Founder of The Joe Bonham Project.  Both work with wounded veterans to help foster healing through artistic expression.  The works displayed show war through the eyes of those who lived it – and are still living with war’s impact.

Main Art Gallery in new Kent Arts Building

Tara Tappert, Art Consultant and founder of ThemArts and the Military

Tara Tappert, Founder & Director, The Arts & The Military (www.artsandmilitary.org) is an Award-winning scholar, researcher, writer, curator, collections manager, archivist/librarian, editor, graduate-level teacher, academic adviser, and tutor for cultural, educational, and business institutions, and for private individuals and families. Her scholarship is focused in 20th c. American craft – particularly as a rehabilitation tool for war trauma and in late 19th and early 20th c. American art and culture– particularly portraiture, biography, women and art, family history, and genealogy. She is also a noted scholar of the portraitist Cecilia Beaux.

Michael D. Fay, artist and founder of WarFront/HomeFront & Joe Bonham Project

Michael D. Fay, Founder, The Joe Bonham Project, first served in the Marines from 1975 to 1978 as an infantry man attaining the rank of sergeant. He left the service to pursue a college degree and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Art Education from the Pennsylvania State University in 1982. He then re-enlisted in the Marines in December 1983 and served on active duty until September 1993. During this ten-year period he served in the Presidential Helicopter Squadron under President Ronald Reagan, and participated in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Eastern Exit, and Provide Promise campaigns. Seven years later, he enlisted  into the Marine Corps Reserve in January 2000 in order to fill the billet of combat artist with the Field History Department supporting the Historical Division of the Marine Corps.

As an official Marine Corps combat artist, Fay has been mobilized for four extended periods, and has served two tours each in Afghanistan and Iraq. Fay’s paintings and drawings made during these deployments demonstrate how combat looks and feels in a very personal and immediate way. The focus of these works is the human face of war. In images of ordinary people conducting routine business in difficult and unfamiliar circumstances, he reminds us of individual sacrifice and heroism.

Drawings of soldiers in the WarFront/HomeFront Exhibit currently at the Kent County Arts Council Arts Building through Dec. 3.

 

 

 

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Christ Church of Easton Host Annapolis Chamber Ensemble and Two Pianists

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Woobin Park

The Christ Church Concert Series in Easton continues its 2017-18 season Sunday, Nov. 19 4 p.m. featuring the Annapolis Chamber Players.  The ensemble includes some of the finest musicians in the Baltimore-Washington area.  Known for their eclectic programs ranging from the 18th through the 21st centuries, the ensemble specializes in mixed chamber music for winds, strings, and piano, a flexible instrumentation that offers a variety of musical colors and styles.

While all six of the ensemble’s members have gathered an impressive cache of honors and distinctions, its two pianists, each a world-class talent, will perform on Sunday’s concert. Woobin Park made her Carnegie Hall debut in 2010 to critical acclaim. The New York Concert Review raved, “Park gave a brilliant performance, handling the virtuosity with beautiful sense of style…” She has appeared throughout the United States and South Korea in solo and chamber recitals as well as solo performances with orchestra. Park has performed in venues including Carnegie Hall and Steinway Hall in New York, Strathmore Hall in Washington, and Elizabeth Horowitz Performing Arts Center in Maryland. Her live performances have been nationally broadcast. Woobin has earned prizes in several competitions including the Los Angeles Liszt International Piano Competition, where she was also awarded “Best Performance of the Required Work.” On Sunday, Park will perform Carl Frühling’s Trio for Clarinet, Violoncello and Piano, Op. 40 with clarinetist and ensemble director, Phyllis Richardson and cellist Dorotea Racz.  In addition to her performing career and masterclasses throughout the country, Park serves on the piano faculty at Washington College.

Stefan Petrov

American-Bulgarian pianist Stefan Petrov, whose arresting interpretations and broad musical versatility have captivated audiences across Europe, North America and the Caribbean, will perform Johannes Brahms’ Trio in E-flat Major for Piano, Violin and French, Op. 40 along with violinist Kristen Bakkegard and hornist, Heidi Brown. Petrov has appeared in Steinway Hall (New York, NY), Steinway Series at the Smithsonian Museum, the Bulgarian National Palace of Culture and others. He partners frequently with Israeli-American cellist Amit Peled in recitals across the U.S., while also serving as head of the collaborative piano department at the prestigious Heifetz International Music

Sunday’s concert is partially funded by a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council and the Maryland State Arts Council.  Doors open at 3:30 p.m.  A freewill offering will be received to support this and upcoming concerts.  Christ Church is located at 111 S. Harrison Street in downtown Easton. For information call 410-822-2677 or click here.