Easton Businesses Support No Matter What. . . You Matter Suicide Prevention Campaign

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According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) every 13 minutes someone dies by suicide nationally. The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention reports that in Maryland, on average, one person dies by suicide every 15 hours, which results in more people dying by suicide in Maryland annually than by homicide. This fall, to help create awareness about this community mental health issue, For All Seasons is hosting its 2nd Annual NO MATTER WHAT . . . YOU MATTER Suicide Prevention Campaign with a kick-off event in Easton and a weeklong Shop & Dine event from October 5-13. The Campaign’s goals are to provide some of the warning signs of suicide and tips for how to help prevent suicide.

On Friday, October 5, 2018, from 5 to 8 p.m., For All Seasons will kick-off its second Suicide Prevention Campaign in Easton at the Bartlett Pear Inn at 28 South Harrison Street. The free event will include refreshments and live music – all are welcome.

Monika Mraz, Director of Development at For All Seasons, comments, “We are thrilled to have the support of Easton businesses to help us promote awareness about suicide prevention in Talbot County. This is a real issue in our communities on the Shore and we hope to enhance the community’s understanding of the issue, while providing some valuable tips in how to prevent suicide with our friends and family members.”

In 2017, the campaign raised $20,000 from 26 participating Easton businesses. This year, the following Easton businesses are participating in the weeklong event, donating a portion of sales on specific dates during the campaign week to benefit For All Seasons’ suicide prevention work. To date, these businesses include: Bon Mojo (October 6), Crackerjacks (October 10), Doc’s Downtown Grille (October 8, 5–10 p.m.), Dragonfly Boutique (October 12), Easton Acupuncture – Jen Coleman (October 10), Ebbtide Wellness (October 9), Frugalicious (October 7), Hill’s Café & Juice Bar (October 12), Krave (October 12), La De Da (October 6), Lizzy Dee (October 10), Marc|Randall (October 12), Out of the Fire, (October 10), Piazza Italian Market (October 12), Salisbury Gift & Garden (October 9, 10, 11, 12 & 13), Shearer the Jeweler (October 10), Sonny’s of NY Pizza (October 10), Trade Whims (October 12), and Vintage Books and Fine Art (October 12).

Sponsors of this year’s event include A Time to Heal Physical Therapy, Ashley Insurance, Baird Wealth Management, Bartlett Pear Inn, Bay Pilates, Berrier, Ltd, Chuck Mangold Jr. of  Benson & Mangold, Computers of Easton, Curlicue, Fitness Rx, Hair o’ the Dog, Hill’s Drug Store, Kevertin Pet Resort, Kiln Born Creations, Laser Letters, Massage Plus, Mid-Shore Community  Foundation, Near & Far Media, Rise Up Coffee Roasters, Shore United Bank, Studio 2 Salon, The Trippe Gallery, Troika Gallery, West Wing Salon, and YMCA of Chesapeake. Special thanks goes to Easton Business Alliance.

Suicide does not discriminate, affecting people of all genders, ages, and ethnicities. Many different factors may contribute to someone making a suicide attempt. For All Seasons hopes that by discussing the signs and symptoms associated with suicide that it can raise awareness about the issue in our community.  Because family and friends are often the first to recognize the warning signs of suicide, they can be critical to helping an individual find treatment with a provider who specializes in diagnosing and treating mental health conditions.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), for every suicide, 25 suicide attempts are made. For All Seasons wants people to know that if they think a friend or family member is considering suicide, they should reach out and start a conversation. Talking openly about suicidal thoughts and feelings can save a life. The following are three steps to help people begin the conversation:

1)            Ask directly – “Are you having suicidal thoughts?” – Let them know you care.

2)            Stay and Listen – Let them share their thoughts and feelings.

3)            Get help – Connect them with a friend, family member or a therapist at For All Seasons.

Beth Anne Langrell, Executive Director of For All Seasons, comments, “For All Seasons hopes through this campaign to create an ongoing dialogue with agencies about this growing issue in our communities.  We want people to know that no matter what, they do matter.”

For All Seasons provides Trauma Certified Individual, Family, and Group Therapy; Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry; and Crisis and Advocacy Services for Child, Adolescent, and Adult Victims of Sexual Assault, Rape and Trauma. For a same-day crisis appointment, call 410-822-1018.

Throughout the year, For All Seasons brings awareness to the community about such issues as suicide, sexual assault, trauma, and mental health needs.

Follow For All Seasons on Facebook to find out how to get involved. For further information, call Monika Mraz at 410-822-1018, email mmraz@forallseasonsinc.org or visit forallseasonsinc.org/youmatter.

Healthcare Plans See Reductions of Premiums in Maryland for 2019

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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Friday announced a reduction in next year’s insurance premium rates for individual healthcare plans in the state.

The two health insurance providers in the state’s Maryland Health Benefit Exchange — which operates the marketplace consumers use to purchase healthcare under the Affordable Care Act — Kaiser Permanente and CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, will offer an average of about a 13 percent reduction in premiums across the board, the governor said. The new rates will take effect on Jan. 1.

The announcement comes after the federal government in August approved the state’s request for a waiver to establish a reinsurance program to stabilize the insurance market and prevent rate spikes.

“Rather than huge increases in health insurance rates, we are instead delivering significantly and dramatically lower rates for Marylanders,” Hogan said. “For the first time since the Affordable Care Act went into effect, all individual insurance rates in Maryland will go down instead of up.”

Prior to the waiver’s approval, insurance premiums were expected to increase dramatically next year for both HMO and PPO healthcare plans. CareFirst’s PPO rate was expected to increase by more than 90 percent. It will now decrease by 11 percent, the governor said.

CareFirst’s HMO plan, which covers more than half of the nearly 200,000 Marylanders with health insurance plans purchased in the individual market as of June 30, will see a 17 percent decrease.

Kaiser had proposed a rate increase of almost 40 percent. Instead their rates will drop by about 7 percent.

“As a result of these rates, the health insurance market in Maryland will finally have the chance to become more competitive and dynamic,” Hogan said, adding the reinsurance program will make healthcare more affordable and increase competition by coaxing more insurers into the market.

The reinsurance program is a temporary fix, however. The waiver runs through 2020 but could last through 2023, according to the waiver application — and a more permanent solution must be enacted by the federal government to ensure rates do not increase down the line, said Maryland Health Insurance Commissioner Al Redmer.

“Most of the rules regarding the Affordable Care Act are embedded in federal law. Very little authority is given to the states,” Redmer said. “What we really need — and what we’ve been advocating for years — is for Congress to put aside those partisan differences and come up with common sense solutions or give us more authority to make changes here in the states.”

Redmer declined to speculate whether insurance rates would increase after the waiver expires without a long-term solution in place.

“Short term, our health insurance rates are (going to be) much more competitive than they were this year,” Redmer said, adding that the lower rates will add more consumers to the insurance market making it healthier overall.

By Brooks DuBose

United Way Research Reveal Kent County Residents Struggling to Afford Basic Necessities

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United Way releases surprising data on their 2018 Maryland ALICE Project which identifies households that have incomes above the Federal Poverty Level but struggle to afford basic household necessities. That finding is true for both Kent County and the rest of the state. 

The report, which uses 2016 data, shows that in Maryland 825,433 households or 38% could not afford basic needs such as housing, childcare, food, transportation, healthcare, and a smartphone. These statistics indicate an increase of three percent from last year’s report. Low-wage jobs, half of all jobs paying less than $20 per hour, and an increase in “gig” and contractual work all contribute to decreased financial stability for working households.

The ALICE Project utilizes standardized measurements to calculate the cost of a bare-bones household budget in each county in each state and quantifies the number of households that cannot afford even that. It includes Household Survival Budgets which have increased steadily, reaching $69,672 for a family of four (two adults with one infant and one preschooler) and $26,052 for a single adult in 2016. These conclusions are an alternative to FPL guidelines, which underestimates the number of struggling families as it does not accurately reflect current, local costs of living.

“At United Way of Kent County, the ALICE findings have reinforced our commitment to addressing the issues stressed in our Community Needs Assessment,” said Glenn Wilson, Board President, United Way of Kent County. “This updated research underscores our findings and highlights the issues that need more attention here and how to provide services to this vulnerable population.”

Following is the Kent County breakdown of Household Survival Budgets and percentage of households living below the ALICE Threshold:

“ALICE isn’t going away,” said Franklin Baker, president and CEO of United Way of Central Maryland “and as this latest report shows, the numbers are only increasing. We must continue to work together to help remove barriers in areas such as housing, transportation, and childcare that prevent so many of our citizens from leading a stable, secure life. Stronger, stable working families mean stronger, stable communities. And that’s something that United Way, our donors, volunteers, staff and partners fight for every day.”

The United Ways of Maryland join more than 540 United Ways in 18 states that are working to better understand ALICE’s struggles. The research will be used to stimulate meaningful discussion, attract new partners and ultimately inform strategies for positive change.

For more information on the ALICE report please go here

 

 

UM SRH & Shock Trauma Center Provide Stop The Bleed Training

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UM Shore Regional Health and Shock Trauma Center will provide hands-on Stop the Bleed training for Kent County health professionals and first responders. The training will be held at Kent County Health Dept. – 125 S. Lynchburg St., Chestertown on September 21, 9 am – 12:30 p.m. (Three sessions: 9 am – 10 am, 10:15 am – 11:15 am, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. The sessions are divided between classroom lecture – first 30 minutes- and hands-on training – second 30 minute block)Stop the Bleed training will teach people how to stop bleeding in the event of traumatic injuries. Participants will be instructed how to apply tourniquets and pack a wound.

More than 50 people are signed up to be trained, including Kent County Health Dept staff, paramedics and EMTs with Kent County volunteer fire companies, members of the Kent County Healthcare Emergency Response Coalition (HERC), and Maryland Responds Medical Reserve Corp Volunteers.

Dr. Habeeba Park, Associate Professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Critical Care Surgeon at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center and STC physician lead for the Stop the Bleed Initiative, will lead the training. Assisting Dr. Park with the hands-on training will be Adam Brown, EMS Captain for Millington Volunteer Fire Company, and Charlene Perry, RN, Public Health Emergency Planner for Kent County Health Dept.

Stop the Bleed is a national campaign sponsored by the American College of Surgeons and Hartford Consensus to train people to assist in a bleeding emergency before professional help arrives. Massive bleeding from any cause, but particularly in a situation where a medical response is delayed, can result in death. Similar to how the general public learns and performs CPR, it is important for the public to learn proper bleeding control techniques, including how to use their hands, dressings and tourniquets. Victims can quickly die from uncontrolled bleeding — within five to 10 minutes — if the bleeding is not stopped.

Using mannequins, participants will be working hands-on to learn the appropriate ways to control bleeding. Interviews will be available with participants and trainers.

For more information:

www.umms.org/ummc/health-services/shock-trauma/patient-information/stop-the-bleed
www.bleedingcontrol.org
https://www.umms.org/shore

Talisman Golfers Raise Funds for Heroes

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Golfers met at the Eisenhower golf course on September 11th to commemorate the heroic deeds of the first responders on that day 17 years ago and our wounded vets who are fighting for us everyday.

This is the first time that the golf tourney, the “Rider Cup,” sponsored by Talisman Therapeutic Riding, Inc. in Grasonville was held on the Western Shore. This year’s location did not dissuade the Eastern Shore golfers from participating but it did, in fact, make it more convenient for the organization’s Western Shore supporters to play.

Following a lunch provided by Pasta and Murphy Ameriprise, the golfers teed off at 1:00 PM and began the competition for longest drive, closest to the tee, low net, …… The day concluded with dinner and prizes.

Talisman Therapeutic Riding is the only year round PATH certified therapeutic riding facility on the Eastern Shore. After beginning with one horse and 2 riders in 2011, the organization’s instructors and therapists now provide more than 3500 lessons a year to veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and children and adults with physical, emotional, and cognitive needs.

Camp New Dawn Wraps Up its 24th Year

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Compass Regional Hospice recently completed its 24th Camp New Dawn, a grief retreat summer camp for children, teens and families, held annually at Camp Pecometh near Centreville.

The retreat, which took place from Aug. 18 to 21, is designed to meet the needs of all ages and stages of grief, serving children and teens between the ages of 4 and 17, as well as their families. This year, 92 children and eight families were served by Camp New Dawn.

Of those numbers, 35 participants were from Queen Anne’s County, 25 were from Caroline County and 12 were from Kent County. Other camp participants were from other Mid-Shore and Maryland counties, and some came from as far away as Delaware to take part in camp.

From left are Compass Regional Hospice’s Camp New Dawn Director Rhonda Knotts and Nathan Powell.

Camp New Dawn Director Rhonda Knotts, who has been involved with the camp for nearly 20 years, said, “It’s just a reflection of what our community, the losses they have suffered and the pain that is still out there. Remembrance is necessary in healing. You may not realize it at first, but Camp New Dawn helps you to take a step forward; just by showing up, honoring, remembering and crying for your loved ones … you move forward, just a little bit. Somehow, you walk through a doorway.”

Nearly 120 volunteers were on hand during the camp to make sure it ran smoothly. About two dozen more assisted with preparations prior to camp beginning.

The most visible volunteers are “Buddies” — caring and compassionate adults who were paired up with campers to provide support. There also were support staff volunteers who tended to every detail of camp by helping plan, set up and facilitate activities. Former campers, “PALS” and “Campatiers,” were found helping in a variety of ways around camp, as well as sharing their own personal camp experiences with new campers.

Knotts said every year the camp is notably full of amazing volunteers and memorable support groups, but this year, she also noted the impact of the younger volunteers – how many campers eventually become volunteers, helping other children and families through difficult periods of grief.

“I get so emotional about our volunteers, because they just keep showing up, every year,” Knotts said. “It’s these kids, too, these young adults, who, if we can give them pieces of this, they really can, through ideas of their own, make Camp New Dawn grow into the future.”

Pictured are participants following a therapeutic activity that involved spray-painting a van to express their feelings.

Knotts said it is not just the visible volunteers that make Camp New Dawn so special, but the ones behind the scenes, as well. Several of those behind-the-scenes volunteers include the Anthony family and several friends who make the opening night cookout possible; Carolyn Moorsehead who purchased all the food for the opening night cookout; Karla Horton of Dragonfly Paddle and Fitness who offered to teach yoga to children during opening night therapeutic activities; Dave Briguglio of Ridgely and owner of Greener Systems LLC, and several of his friends, who cook and provide boardwalk fries to the campers during the opening night cookout; and countless others who volunteer their time, talents and money to make sure the campers have a unique and memorable experience, before, during and after camp.

One such volunteer is Nathan Powell, who spent two weeks prior to the start of Camp New Dawn making gallons of homemade vanilla ice cream for the campers to enjoy during the opening night cookout.

“You know, it’s not the idea of him making the ice cream, really, it’s the idea of the devotion,” Knotts said. “What people are willing to do to somehow make Camp New Dawn even more special. Dr. (Thomas) Walsh (Compass Regional Hospice’s chief medical director) had a snow cone mobile show up on Monday during camp; Georgia and Jim Wilkison arranged for a snow cone mobile to show up on Sunday, in the heat of the afternoon … snow cones for every volunteer and every kid. It’s not the gift, it’s the idea that they want to make it more memorable for these kids.”

Knotts said the August retreat helps participants learn healthy ways to express their grief.

“Under the guidance of professional grief support staff and specially trained volunteers, participants are taught healthy ways to express their grief in a safe, supportive and fun environment, while also getting to know others who are on a similar journey,” Knotts said.

Campers ages 7 to 17 attended therapeutic workshops, age-specific grief support groups and participated in supervised camp activities, such as swimming, fishing, drumming, yoga and arts and crafts.

Camp New Dawn uses Camp Pecometh near Centreville as the site for the long-weekend camp, and Knotts said Compass Regional Hospice is “deeply grateful and appreciative for all the support from Camp Pecometh’s staff.”

Camp New Dawn also included an overnight adult and family retreat that began Sunday, Aug. 19. While their campers were busy learning how to cope with their grief, parents and guardians were invited to attend the adult retreat designed to help restore participants to a place of wholeness as they learn to navigate their own grief journey. Activities included grief support groups, therapeutic workshops and restorative activities, such as sunrise yoga and nature walks. The adults then were then joined by their children for overnight family camp, where they came together to learn skills they could take home with them. A mini retreat for children ages 4 to 6 was held Monday, Aug. 20.

The cost of Camp New Dawn was $30 per camper and $75 per family. These fees represent a small fraction of the actual cost of operating Camp New Dawn and no one is ever turned away because of an inability to pay. Compass Regional Hospice relies on community donations, grants and fundraising events to cover expenses, so that anyone who needs to attend may participate in Camp New Dawn.

During closing ceremonies, campers and volunteers gathered and walked to the ceremony together while chanting “We Heal. We Laugh. We Create.”

Knotts said she is grateful for a community who cares and who devoted time, resources and funding to make sure camp is available to those who need it.

“Camp New Dawn is a year-round priority for us at Compass Regional Hospice,” Knotts said. “We work really hard all year to make sure we have what we need for these children and families.”

For more information about Camp New Dawn, contact Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org. For more information about volunteering for Camp New Dawn, contact Courtney Williams, assistant Camp New Dawn director, at 443-262-4112 or cwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org. For more information about donating to Camp New Dawn, contact Kenda Leager, development officer, at 443-262-4106 or kleager@compassregionalhospice.org.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a life-limiting illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville and Chestertown. Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one, through The Hope and Healing Center. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

No Matter What. . . You Matter Campaign Targets Suicide Prevention

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According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) every 13 minutes someone dies by suicide and for every suicide, 25 suicide attempts are made. This fall, to help create awareness about this community mental health issue, For All Seasons kicks off its 2nd Annual NO MATTER WHAT . . . YOU MATTER Suicide Prevention Campaign the week of October 5 through 13, 2018.

The Campaign kicks off on Friday, October 5, 2018, from 5 to 8 p.m., at the Bartlett Pear Inn at 28 South Harrison Street in Easton. The free event will include champagne and hors d’oeuvres and live music. The event is part of the First Friday stroll through the local galleries and shops in Easton and provides the opportunity to learn more about what For All Seasons is doing to help those in crisis. The Campaign is being organized by For All Seasons Committee Members Diane Flagler, Allie Prell, and Amy Steward. All are welcome.

In 2017, the campaign raised $20,000 from 26 participating Easton businesses. Again this year, a number of Easton businesses are participating in the weeklong event, donating a portion of sales on specific dates during the campaign week to For All Seasons’ suicide prevention work. To date, these businesses include: Bon Mojo (October 6), Crackerjacks (October 10), Doc’s Downtown Grille (October 8, 5–10 p.m.), Dragonfly Boutique (October 12), Easton Acupuncture (October 10), Ebbtide Wellness (October 9), Frugalicious (October 7), Hill’s Café & Juice Bar (October 12), Krave (October 12), La De Da! (October 6), Lizzy Dee (October 10), Marc Randall (October 12), Out of the Fire, (To Be Announced), Piazza Italian Market (To Be Announced), Salisbury Gift & Garden (October 9, 10, 11, 12 & 13), Shearer the Jeweler (October 10), Sonny’s of NY Pizza (To Be Announced), Trade Whims (October 12), and Vintage Books and Fine Art (October 12).

Sponsors of this year’s event include A Time to Heal Physical Therapy, Ashley Insurance, Baird Wealth Management, Bartlett Pear Inn, Bay Pilates, Berrier, Ltd, Chuck Mangold Jr. of  Benson & Mangold, Computers of Easton, Curlicue, Fitness Rx, Hair o’ the Dog, Hill’s Drug Store, Kevertin Pet Resort, Kiln Born Creations, Laser Letters, Mid-Shore Community  Foundation, Near & Far Media, Rise Up Coffee Roasters, Shore United Bank, Studio 2 Salon, The Trippe Gallery, Troika Gallery, West Wing Salon, and YMCA of Chesapeake. Special thanks goes to Easton Business Alliance.

Suicide does not discriminate, affecting people of all genders, ages, and ethnicities. Many different factors may contribute to someone making a suicide attempt. For All Seasons hopes that by discussing the signs and symptoms associated with suicide that it can raise awareness about the issue in our community.  Because family and friends are often the first to recognize the warning signs of suicide, they can be critical to helping an individual find treatment with a provider who specializes in diagnosing and treating mental health conditions.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), for every suicide, 25 suicide attempts are made. For All Seasons wants people to know that If they think a friend or family member is considering suicide, they should reach out and start a conversation. Talking openly about suicidal thoughts and feelings can save a life. The following are three steps to help people begin the conversation:

1) Ask directly – “Are you having suicidal thoughts?” – Let them know you care.

2) Stay and Listen – Let them share their thoughts and feelings.

3) Get help – Connect them with a friend, family member or a therapist at For All Seasons.

Beth Anne Langrell, Director of For All Seasons, comments, “For All Seasons hopes through this campaign to create an ongoing dialogue with agencies about this growing issue in our communities.  The campaign will include dialogue circles, educational outreach and community events.  We want people to know that no matter what, they do matter.”

For All Seasons provides Trauma Certified Individual, Family, and Group Therapy; Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatry; and Crisis and Advocacy Services for Child, Adolescent, and Adult Victims of Sexual Assault, Rape and Trauma. For a same-day crisis appointment, call 410-822-1018.

Throughout the year, For All Seasons brings awareness to the community about such issues as suicide, sexual assault, trauma, and mental health needs.

Follow For All Seasons on Facebook to find out how to get involved. For further information, call Monika Mraz at 410-822-1018, email mmraz@forallseasonsinc.org or visit forallseasonsinc.org/youmatter.

Dr. Paul Katz, Addiction Specialist, Joins Eastern Shore Psychological Services

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Paul M. Katz, DO, FACA, FASAM will join the medical team at Eastern Shore Psychological Services (ESPS) full time this month.  As the Associate Medical Director for Recovery Services, he will lead the Agency’s recovery team in expanding state of the art Recovery Programs.  Dr. Katz will provide direct care services primarily at the agency’s Kent and Talbot County locations.  Dr. Katz is board certified in addiction medicine, anesthesiology and family practice.  He received his doctorate from Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine and training in anesthesiology at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  Dr. Katz is Diplomat of the American Board of Addiction Medicine and President-Elect of the Maryland-D.C. Society of Addiction Medicine He in the Founder of the Chesapeake Wellness Center where he has provided specialized treatment in substance abuse in Cecil County since 2000.

Dr. Ben Kohl, Director of Mid Shore Programs for ESPS notes, “We are thrilled to have Dr. Katz join our team.  His philosophy of treating the whole person, commitment to promoting mental wellness and relapse prevention, and clear dedication to treating this epidemic in rural communities makes him a perfect match for our agency.”

Eastern Shore Psychological Services was formed in 1999 in Salisbury, Maryland by Dr. Kathryn Seifert and has grown to become one of the leading providers of behavioral health on the Shore.   The agency, which has locations in Somerset, Worchester, Talbot and Kent counties, annually helps over 3,000 consumers address mental health concerns, recover from substance use problems, and heal from the impact of trauma.  Dr. Larry Pezor, ESPS Chief Medical Officer, adds, “Dr. Katz’ expertise brings a level of care and quality of service unsurpassed by any Agency on the Eastern Shore”.

To learn more about how to access ESPS services please call 443-282-0102 or visit www.espsmd.com.

Women and Girls Fund’s Purple Grants in Action: Rising Above Disease with Bonnie Scott

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As noted in our first Women & Girls Fund Goes Purple interview Sherry Collier with Restoring H.O.P.E. in Women it could be said that the  WGF has been wearing purple a long time before Talbot Goes Purple started their successful awareness campaign last year. A philanthropic organization committed to empowering women and girls; it also seeks to help with the unique health needs, both physical and mental, of women in our community who are trying to rebuilding their lives after a life of drug or alcohol abuse.

In the Spy’s ongoing Grants in Action series with the WGF, we turn our attention to Rising Above Disease’s women-only recovery house founded by Bonnie Scott.

WGF board member Talli Oxnam once again introduces Bonnie and her extraordinary personal journey from addiction to recovery, and her commitment to supporting women as a tribute to her son who tragically lost his life due to a drug overdose a few years ago.

This video is approximately six minutes in length. For more information about Rising Above Disease please go here

This is the ten in a series of stories focused on the work of the Women & Girls Fund of the Mid-Shore. Since 2002, the Fund has channeled its pooled resources to organizations that serve the needs and quality of life for women and girls in Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot Counties. The Spy, in partnership with the Women & Girls Fund, are working collaboratively to put the spotlight on twelve of these remarkable agencies to promote their success and inspire other women and men to support the Fund’s critical role in the future.