Insight Meditation Community Offers Introductory Class 

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The Insight Meditation Community of Chestertown is offering a 6-week Introduction to Insight Meditation class on Sunday afternoons from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. beginning September 10, 2017. At the heart of insight meditation is the practice of mindfulness, the cultivation of clear, stable and non-judgmental awareness. Anne Briggs, the group’s leader, and Wendy Morrison, a mindfulness and yoga teacher, will be teaching the classes, which will be held at the Chester River Friends Meeting House, 124 Philosophers Terrace, Chestertown. There is a $25.00 registration fee, which can be mailed to Anne Briggs at 220 N. Kent Street, Chestertown, Md. 21620. Checks should be made payable to IMC – Chestertown and accompanied by your e-mail address and telephone number.

The Insight Meditation Community’s website states that “The purpose of the Insight Meditation Community of Chestertown is to provide instruction and support for the practices of insight (vipassana) and lovingkindness (metta) meditation, and to foster understanding of the Buddha’s teachings (the Dharma). Our teachings and practices come from the Western “Insight Meditation” branch of the Theravadan lineage of Buddhism, as taught by Joseph Goldstein, Jack Kornfield, Sharon Salzberg and many others. We also welcome teachers and teachings from other lineages of Buddhism.”

For further information, please get in touch with Anne Briggs by telephone at 410-778-1746, or by e-mail at info@imc-chestertown.org, or consult the group’s web site.

Pink Polar Bear Golf Tourney Raises $2,550 for the Women’s Center

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Pink Polar Bear Tournament participants paused for a group photo after coming in from the links at Chestertown Yacht and Country Club.

The sixth annual Pink Polar Bear Golf Tournament, held August 6 at the Chester River Yacht & Country Club, raised $2,550 to benefit patient care in the Eleanor & Ethel Leh Women’s Center at UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown.

According to tournament co-chair Gwinn Derricott, who also is a hospital volunteer, 66 members and guests of the club, which is located just outside Chestertown, participated in this year’s event. “Everyone says that this is the most fun tournament they play in because of the format and the camaraderie,” Derricott said. “We’ve come a long way from a group of nine and 18-hole lady golfers and we’re looking forward to many more tournaments.”

Jane Hukill, tournament co-chair and also a hospital volunteer said, “We call it the Pink Polar Bear tournament because early on, it was explained to us that finding breast cancer can be like trying to find a polar bear in a blizzard.  When we saw the capabilities of the tomosynthesis in mammography, we had to do our part to support the continued availability of this technology in Chestertown.”

Kelly Bottomley, regional manager, Imaging, for UM Shore Regional Health, said that mammography is the medical “gold standard” to identify breast cancer. The Eleanor & Ethel Leh Women’s Center, which opened in October 2013, was the first facility on the Delmarva Peninsula to offer 3-D digital mammography with tomosynthesis, which can identify breast cancer at the earliest possible stage; in 2016, the Center performed 2,643 mammograms.

“On behalf of both the staff of the Leh Women’s Center and the patients who come to us for treatment, I am humbled to thank everyone who helped make the Pink Polar Bear tournament such a great success this year as in the past – in fact, their support grows larger every year. Their generosity and commitment is making a positive difference for women’s health here in Kent County and beyond, and we are proud to have them as part of our family of care,” Bottomley stated.

The Leh Center also offers bone density testing. A plastic surgeon is on site at the Center two days a week for breast surgery, reconstruction, consultation and other services.

Rally Set for Overdose Awareness Day on August 31 in Denton

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A rally for Overdose Awareness Day is set from 3 until 7 p.m. on August 31 in Denton.

The rally location is 109 Market Street on the courthouse green and will include several speakers; resources and information; food, drinks and baked goods for sale. Attendees are encouraged to bring chairs and blankets.

“This event is an effort to bring awareness to the opioid/heroin epidemic many in Caroline County are facing,” said Catherine Bowery, who organized the event. “This is a nationwide event and Caroline County’s second year – last year we had 150 people attend and we hope to reach many more this year.”

Scheduled speakers include: Glenn Fueston Jr., executive director, Governor’s Office of Crime Control & Prevention; Ruth A. Colbourne, superintendent at Caroline County Department of Corrections; Judge Jonathan G. Newell, Caroline County administrative judge, Circuit Court; Brian Ebling, director of emergency services in Caroline County; John Darling, drug court coordinator; John R. Bounds, Caroline County sheriff; plus people recovering from drug use disorders and family members who have lost a child due to an overdose.

Overdose Awareness Day, a national observance, recognizes those who’ve died from overdoses, and spreads the message that overdose deaths are preventable. Attending offers a powerful way to stand together and remember those we’ve lost. The global events also help spread the message that the tragedy of overdose death IS preventable.

Melanie Rodriguez, drug and alcohol prevention specialist with the Caroline County Health Department, plans to attend the rally with a table full of resources.

“We’re working hard to help the community learn how to help prevent the use and misuse of alcohol, tobacco and drugs,” Rodriguez said. “Proper medication storage and disposal is one way the public can help prevent overdose deaths – Narcan training is another.”

The Denton rally is hosted by the local chapter of the national FED UP! Coalition, which is a grassroots coalition of people calling for an end to the epidemic of drug dependency and overdose deaths attributed to opioids. Rallies are scheduled for August 31 across the country, including Washington, D.C.

Bowrey said the goals of the event include showing that recovery is possible and showing local government the community needs help in the fight.

For more information on the event, please contact Bowrey at ccmdhaa@gmail.com. More information on the Fed Up! Coalition is available at www.feduprally.org.

For information on substance use and misuse prevention services, contact Rodriguez at 410-479-8164. Information also is available on Facebook @CarolineCountyPrevention.

Save Our Hospital Group Responds to Workgroup Report

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Leaders of the Save Our Hospital group and other concerned citizens have sent a letter about recommendations of the Maryland Rural Health Workgroup’s in the draft report on the future of the Chestertown hospital. The letter cites a number of potential problems with the report, especially as its recommendations would affect Kent County residents. Signers include a number of doctors, the mayor of Chestertown and two town council members, the president of Washington College, the director of Heron Point and board members of the hospital foundation along with other business and community leaders.

The hospital,  a branch of University of Maryland Medical System, has been the focus of community concerns since UMMS acquired it in 2007. While the UM Shore Regional Health board, the immediate parent facility, has committed to keeping the hospital open through 2022, its future beyond that date remains uncertain, Many community members interpret recent staff cuts and other reductions in services as preliminaries to downsizing the facility with an eye to closing it shortly after 2022.

The Rural Health Workgroup is in the final stages of writing its report, which the legislators will then turn into law.  The final report will be presented at the last full workgroup meeting, Sept. 28 in Annapolis.

Here is the Save Our Hospital letter as submitted.

To:        Members of the Rural Health Workgroup and staff of the Maryland Health Care Commission

From: Leadership, Save Our Hospital physicians and citizens group

Date:    August 10, 2017

Re:        Concerns about the draft recommendations  

Dear Workgroup Members and Staff:

As members of the physician-led Kent and northern Queen Anne’s community volunteer group Save Our Hospital, we write to share our reaction to the draft recommendations discussed at the July 25 meeting of the Rural Health Workgroup.

We are grateful to the Health Care Commission staff and the Workgroup members, especially chairs Deborah Mizeur and Joseph Ciatola, for the time and thought they have dedicated to the process of rethinking and redesigning a health-care delivery plan that works for rural communities like ours.

We wholeheartedly endorse the majority of the recommendations, which concern greater coordination and clustering of health-related services, providing in-home or close-to-home care for patients, incentives for attracting and retaining physicians and other health-care professionals, reducing re-admission rates, avoiding unnecessary visits to emergency rooms, and exploiting the power of telemedicine and other innovations to increase timely access to the highest quality diagnostic and treatment expertise.

But we have serious concerns.

Since our original 2015 meetings (which sparked Maryland’s General Assembly and the State Secretary of Health and Mental Hygiene to create your Workgroup), the Save the Hospital citizens group has continued to focus on the viability and vitality of the acute care hospital in Chestertown, now part of University of Maryland Medical System’s Shore Regional Health System. Most of our concerns for the Workgroup recommendations therefore revolve around the concept of the special Rural Community Hospital. That designation is outlined on page 11 of the draft recommendations under item 10: “Create a special hospital designation for Rural Communities.”

While we applaud the creation of a new category of hospital if it will help ensure the continued financial success of our county’s second largest employer, we have specific concerns about the defining characteristics and longevity outlined in the draft recommendations:

Item 10. b. states that the hospital must be “located 35 miles or more from the nearest general acute care hospital.” While we understand that the mileage figure comes from the federal designation for a Critical Access Hospital, it is not a safe measure for rural Maryland communities such as Kent County.  The current hospital in Chestertown is approximately 34 miles from the site of the proposed Easton medical center on Route 50 near the Easton Airport. Thousands of residents, tourists, beach-goers, boaters, students, campers and staffers from marinas, summer camps and environmental education programs in remote parts of Kent County, notably Rock Hall, Betterton, Still Pond Neck and Galena, are 45 to 50 miles or more from the Easton site.

To use the 35-mile figure would be cruel, cynical and dangerous.

We believe a safer criterion would be one based not on mileage but on travel time. That would allow for considerations such as beach traffic on Route 50 and other seasonal issues that lengthen the trip to another hospital.

Item 10. f.  states, “The program would last for five years and would be renewable by agreement of HSCRC and the hospital.” By leaving the renewal option solely up to the hospital board and executives, this clause threatens to put the Chestertown hospital (and any designated Rural Community hospital) right back into the untenable situation that first sparked community outrage and led to the creation of the Rural Health Workgroup in the first place.

A hospital is too important to the health, economy and social wellbeing of a community to be redefined and converted into a lesser facility without vigorous community and legislative debate and input.  The State must require a review process that ensures public discussion and input from the affected hospital’s medical staff and guarantees that the hospital decision makers are hearing and acting on community and physician concerns.  The procedure for altering a Rural Community Hospital’s status should be similar in scope and as rigorous as Maryland’s existing Certificate of Need process for building or significantly altering health-care facilities.

Need for a local hospital board. Another concern is the continued lack of a truly local board to serve as a liaison, watchdog and advocate for our hospital. While the Workgroup’s deliberations and recommendations have invested in the concept of regional and system-wide collaboratives and oversight, we strongly endorse the idea of a community-based board for any rural community hospital or health complex.

Yes, there is a board of directors for the regional health system (in our case, UMMS Shore Regional Health System), but board members from smaller communities will never have a decisive voice on a regional board.  It is, after all, the almost total disregard for our community’s interests and the diminished status of our hospital by the Easton-based regional board that led us to appeal to the General Assembly for respect and attention. Residents will always be more closely connected to, loyal to, and more likely to donate to, a hospital with its own board drawn entirely from neighbors, friends and civic leaders they know and trust.

(Such a local board would give voice to community concerns about hospital policies such as Shore Regional Health’s “white paper” proposal to eliminate the ICU unit and to reduce inpatient beds based on projected rather than recent  patient data.)

“Put some teeth in it.” Given the severity of the physician shortage in rural areas and the pressure and cost of outspending competitors to attract top medical staff, our group suggests building significant incentives and disincentives into any recommendations that will encourage University of Maryland Medical School to develop more family physicians and general practitioners who will train and eventually practice in Kent County and other rural communities. This was a promise—broken immediately and never fulfilled—that UMMS made nine years ago when it was a suitor seeking ownership of the hospital in Chestertown.

Thank you for giving our concerns your serious consideration. The Kent and northern Queen Anne’s community will remain engaged. We are eager to support Senators Middleton and Hershey and Delegates Jacobs, Ghrist and Arentz as they shepherd the Workgroup report through the halls of the General Assembly and into law.  We know that, despite the long road that brought us to this point, we still have a long way to go to ensure that our future includes a robust hospital at the center of a healthy, equitable, prosperous community.

Sincerely,

Save the Hospital Leadership

Dr. Jerry O’Connor

Dr. Wayne Benjamin

Dr. Michael Peimer

Dr. Ona Kareiva

Dr. Susan Ross

Margie Elsberg, SOH Coordinator, past president of Chester River Health Foundation

Kurt Landgraf, President of Washington College

Chris Cerino, Mayor, Town of Chestertown

Garrett Falcone, executive director, Heron Point CCRC

Glenn Wilson, President and CEO of Chesapeake Bank & Trust, President of United Way     of Kent County

Kay MacIntosh, economic development coordinator, Town of Chestertown

And the following citizens in attendance at the August 10 meeting:

(professional or community affiliations provided as known)

Rev. Ellsworth Tolliver, community leader

Marty Stetson, Chestertown Town Council

Linda Kuiper, Chestertown Town Council

Fred Harmon, representing the residents of Heron Point

Leon Irish

Bill Mohan

Shelby Strudwick

Jim Twohy

Charles Lerner, board member, Chester River Health Foundation

Sandra Bjork, board member, Chester River Health Foundation

David Foster, former Chester River Riverkeeper

Nancy Carter

Zane Carter

Beryl Kemp

Michael McDonnell

Stuart Elsberg, past president, For All Seasons

 

 

 

Chester River Hospital Auxiliary Seeks Volunteers

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Auxiliary members wering their new uniforms in a recent photo

Might you have four hours per week to help?

The Chester River Hospital Auxiliary is looking for volunteers to help with the vital services we provide to our hospital and our communities’ patients: in-hospital patient transports, assisting patients with menu selection and transporting specimens. Both men and women are needed and must be at least 18 years old.

Shifts are just four hours either in the morning or in the afternoon, Monday through Friday. If you can’t commit to a regular shift, we also need substitutes who would be available on an on-call basis!  Uniforms are a navy vest (provided), white shirt and khaki pants or skirt.

For more information, please contact Kathy Davis, volunteer coordinator, at (410) 348-5114.

Safe Sitter Class Set for August 22 in Chestertown

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The popular Safe Sitter babysitting class, for youth ages 11-13, will be offered on Tuesday, August 22, 9 a.m.to 4:30 p.m. at UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown Education Center.

Safe Sitter is a national, non-profit organization that provides programs to teach youth life and safety skills for when they are home alone, watching younger siblings, or babysitting. Over 175 lives have been saved by Safe Sitter graduates using the skills learned through the Safe Sitter training. More information about the program may be found at www.safesitter.org.

The cost for this one-day class, taught by pediatric nurses, is $45 (scholarships are available). Because seating is limited, advance registration is required. For more information or to register, call Chrissy Nelson, 410-778-7668, ext. 2175.

Compass Regional Hospice – Events for August & September

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Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting and helping people through the difficult and challenging time of living with a life-limiting illness. What began as an all-volunteer organization has since developed into a visionary, state-of-the-art organization recognized locally, regionally and statewide for its excellence.

In addition to our home hospice and bereavement care programs, we offer Bridges, a non-medical supportive care program for individuals who are transitioning to the next level of care or are not yet ready for hospice. When care in a patient’s home is not possible, our six-bed Residential Hospice Center offers a clinically supportive environment in a home-like setting.

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based non-profit organization certified by Medicare and the State of Maryland, and accredited by the Joint Commission. It is affiliated with the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization and the Hospice & Palliative Network of Maryland.

For general information, see the  Compass Regional Hospice’s website 

Estate Treasures Store in Chester

August 2017

Estate Treasures Senior Discount SaleEvery Tuesday Estate Treasures offers seniors 25% off full priced items storewide. Estate Treasures is an upscale resale shop than benefits Compass Regional Hospice located at 17 Kent Town Market in Chester. Store hours are 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday with extended hours until 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday. All retail sales are tax-free. Donations of clean, gently used items in good condition are accepted during store hours. For more information, call 410-643-7360.

Wednesday, August 2 and Wednesday, August 16: It’s A Guy’s Thing Support Group 1st and 3rd Wednesday of every month, 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., Commerce Street Creamery, 110 N. Commerce St., Centreville. A casual, drop-in support group for men who have experienced any type of loss.  For more information, contact Wayne Larrimore, 443-262-4100, wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Monday, August 7: Bereaved Parent Support Group— 1st Monday of every month, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., the Hope & Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. For individual dealing with the loss of a child. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts, 443-262-4109, rknotss@compassregionalhospice.org.

Wednesday, August 9: HALOS- Healing After a Loved One’s Suicide Support Group 2nd Wednesday of every month, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., the Hope & Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. For individuals dealing with the loss of a loved one from suicide. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts, 443-262-4109, rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org or Wayne Larrimore, 443-262-4100, wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Thursday, August 17: Drug Overdose Support Group— 3rd Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., the Hope & Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville.  For individuals dealing with the loss of a loved one from drug overdose. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts, 443-262-4109, rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org or Linda Turner, 443-262-4100, lturner@compassregionalhospice.org.

Saturday, August 19 to Tuesday, August 22: Camp New Dawn: This retreat held at Camp Pecometh, 136 Bookers Wharf Rd, Centreville, is designed for children, teens and families grieving after the death of a loved one. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts, 443-262-4109, rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org.

September 2017

Estate Treasures Senior Discount Sale— Every Tuesday Estate Treasures offers seniors 25% off full priced items storewide. Estate Treasures is an upscale resale shop than benefits Compass Regional Hospice located at 17 Kent Town Market in Chester. Store hours are 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday with extended hours until 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday. All retail sales are tax-free. Donations of clean, gently used items in good condition are accepted during store hours. For more information, call 410-643-7360.

Monday, September 4: Bereaved Parent Support Group— 1st Monday of every month, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., the Hope & Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. For individual dealing with the loss of a child. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts, 443-262-4109, rknotss@compassregionalhospice.org.

Wednesday, September 5 and Wednesday, September 19: It’s A Guy’s Thing Support Group— 1st and 3rd Wednesday of every month, 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m., Commerce Street Creamery, 110 N. Commerce St., Centreville. A casual, drop-in support group for men who have experienced any type of loss.  For more information, contact Wayne Larrimore, 443-262-4100, wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Tuesday, September 12 and Thursday, September 14: Compass Regional Hospice Volunteer Training— 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., the Hope & Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive. This session is comprised of 10 hours of learning, to be completed before the start of class. Specialized training for adults who want to assist with patients and families. For more information, contact Courtney Williams, 443-262-4112, cwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org.

Wednesday, September 13: HALOS- Healing After a Loved One’s Suicide Support Group— 2nd Wednesday of every month, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., the Hope & Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. For individuals dealing with the loss of a loved one from suicide. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts, 443-262-4109, rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org or Wayne Larrimore, 443-262-4100, wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Thursday, September 21: Drug Overdose Support Group— 3rd Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., the Hope & Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville.  For individuals dealing with the loss of a loved one from a drug overdose. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts, 443-262-4109, rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org or Linda Turner, 443-262-4100, lturner@compassregionalhospice.org.

Saturday, September 23: Sporting Clay Tournament— Registration begins at 9:00 a.m., 16090 Oakland Rd, Henderson. The entry fee is $100 for individual shooters, $75 for junior shooters ages 17 and under, and $400 for a team of four. The event includes 75 targets, side games, gun raffle, Lewis Class Scoring, catered lunch, and an award ceremony. Gun raffle tickets are $10. Proceeds benefit the Compass Regional Hospice Capital Campaign. For more information, contact Kenda Leager, 443-262-4106, kleager@compassregionalhospice.org.

Monday, September 25 and Wednesday, September 27: Compass Regional Hospice Volunteer Training6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., the Hope & Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive. This session is comprised of 10 hours of learning, to be completed before the start of class. Specialized training for adults who want to assist with patients and families. For more information, contact Courtney Williams, 443-262-4112, cwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org.

Saturday, September 30: Out of the Darkness Walk— Registration at 3:00 p.m., Chesapeake Heritage & Visitor Center, 425 Piney Narrows Rd, Chester. Join in the walk to fight suicide and raise awareness about mental health and to remember someone you love who has been affected by suicide. Sponsored by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. For more information, contact Wayne Larrimore, 443-262-4100, wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Saturday, September 30: Bay to Table Fundraiser— 4:00 p.m to 8:00 p.m., Possum Point Farm, 220 Possum Point Farm, Centreville. This event is an elegant dinner featuring the Chesapeake Bay’s finest tastes to benefit The Hope & Healing Center and Camp New Dawn. $100 includes dinner, beer, and wine. For more information, contact Kenda Leager, 443-262-4106, kleager@compassregionalhospice.org.

Our Mission –  The Compass Regional Hospice team offers individuals, families, and the community “Care on your terms” through comprehensive, professional and compassionate end-of-life care and grief support.

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Mainstay Names Carol Colgate Managing Director

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Carol Colgate

When Carol Colgate first attended a concert at the Mainstay, the intimate storefront performing arts center in the waterfront village of Rock Hall,  her initial impression was, “It felt like home.” Today, as the managing director of the friendly and popular live music venue on Main Street, Colgate says that first impression continues, and she would like everyone to feel that they have a home here.

“What I love about the Mainstay is that it grew organically from the time it was founded by Tom McHugh and the core group of original stakeholders, and that the synergy between the music, the audience, the room and the performers has been a natural development. It really is the home of musical magic,” she said, referring to the tagline that accompanies the venue’s logo.

The new managing director position, created in a management reorganization by the Mainstay’s board of directors, is a natural progression for Colgate. She has 30 years of business and arts administrative experience, having worked primarily in theater. Recently, she was a team member in the Kent County production of the new musical, “Red Devil Moon,” where some of her original paintings were featured.

Colgate’s tenure with the Mainstay began as administrative assistant to former executive director Rory Trainor a year ago.  “Rory re-invigorated my love of performance and gave me the opportunity to combine my management skills with imaginative concepts and creativity,” she notes.  All the while, she took on more and more administrative responsibility.

She is enthusiastic to be working with The Mainstay’s very motivated board members on all the operations that keep the venue a vital, thriving part of the local arts scene.  She sees her job as “maintaining the artistic integrity of a long-standing tradition while continuing to grow and expand by keeping our pulse on what’s exciting in the larger community.” Now that the managing director position is filled, Colgate and the board will be hiring staff to work on the programming and marketing for The Mainstay.

Mainstay board president Dan Seikaly says Colgate was a natural fit for The Mainstay.  “For the first 20 years, The Mainstay operated on the energy of Tom McHugh and a few volunteers,” Seikaly noted. “Following Tom’s departure, everyone became aware of the complexity of running a non-profit entertainment venue that presented over 50 concerts a year.  Carol was undaunted and enthusiastic. She learned, adapted or developed methods to grow The Mainstay without losing sight of what made it unique.”

Beyond her demonstrated executive skills, grants management experience and flexible approach to the multi-faceted needs of The Mainstay, Colgate has an innate understanding of the culture that marks the Mainstay’s popularity with its audience and supporters. “Maintaining that culture is important as we continue to move forward with all the creative strengths that bring everyone together,” she said.

Easterseals “Walk With Me “Event Is October 15

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Register your team for the fifth annual Easterseals Delaware & Maryland’s Eastern Shore “Walk With Me Delmarva” event to be held on Sunday, October 15, 2017, at 3 p.m. at Baywood Greens, 32267, Clubhouse Way, Long Neck, DE. It will unite hundreds of Easterseals families and supporters in lower Delaware and along Maryland’s Eastern Shore to raise funds for Easterseals services in order to impact the lives of local individuals and families living with disabilities.

“Delmarva’s Walk With Me is an opportunity for families, friends, neighbors, and colleagues to walk together to support people with disabilities and their families in our local community,” Linda Forte, Walk With Me event coordinator and community relations coordinator, said. “The event brings the local community together to work for a common goal to give the people we serve more independence through our programs and services.”

In addition to the Walk, enjoy fun games, activities, food and great entertainment. Registration for this year’s event is available at either www.walkwithme.org/delmarva or by contacting Linda Forte at (302) 253-1100 x 1121 or by e-mail at lforte@esdel.org.

Easterseals Delaware & Maryland’s Eastern Shore offers a range of services, including children’s therapies, assistive technology, recreational camping, day programs for adults with physical or intellectual disabilities, and respite services for caregivers. To learn more about how Easterseals helps children and adults with disabilities, call 1-800-677-3800 or visit www.de.easterseals.com.