David Reager and John Seidel Join CBMM Board

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David W. Reager, Esquire, and John L. Seidel, Ph.D., recently joined the Board of Governors of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels, Md.

David W. Reager, Esquire

John L. Seidel, Ph.D.

Reager is a founding and managing partner of the law firm Reager & Adler, PC, in Camp Hill, Pa., supervising the real estate, business law, and estate planning practice areas. He formed the firm in 1979 after serving as an assistant attorney general with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for five years. His education includes a BS and MBA from Pennsylvania State University and a JD from Temple University School of Law.

Reager was chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Fredricksen Library and currently serves on the Board of the Center for Independent Living of Central Pennsylvania and the Camp Hill Community Foundation. When not working, he enjoys sailing, painting and gardening.

Seidel is the Center for Environment & Society Director and the Lammot du Pont Copeland Associate Professor of Anthropology & Environmental Studies at Washington College in Chestertown, Md. Prior to joining the faculty of Washington College in 1998, he worked in the private sector as the lead underwater archaeologist for R. Christopher Goodwin & Associates, one of the largest cultural resource management firms in the nation. He also taught at Rutgers University and the University of Maryland College Park, and his work has taken him from the U.S. to the Middle East and Central and South America. His current research focuses on the relationships between humans and their environments in the Chesapeake Bay region and the development of an environmental model for archaeological site locations on the Eastern Shore.

Seidel is a past president of the Maritime Archaeological & Historical Society, and has served on the Chestertown Historic District Commission and Maryland Historical Trust Board of Trustees. He lives in Chestertown with his wife, Liz, and enjoys boating, SCUBA diving, travel, reading, and music.

 

 

 

 

Tracey

GCI Announces “Open for Business” Recipients

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The Greater Chestertown Initiative’s  “Open for Business in Chestertown” program announced three recipients of “kickstarter” funding for new or expanding businesses in downtown Chestertown.

Bill and Andrew Short of Eastern Interiors; Chris Tilghman of SheShe on High; Carla Massoni and Lani Seikaly of the Greater Chestertown Initiative; and Dale Hornstein and Sharon Puckett of Tiny Tots Boutique

Chosen to receive funding were Chris Tilghman for SheShe on High; Sharon Puckett & Dale Hornstein for Tiny Tots Boutique; and Bill & Andrew Short for Eastern Interiors.

the Open for Business program invites entrepreneurs to submit requests for funding. Awards are made in the form of matching funds and virtually interest free loans. The program is supported by the non-profit SFW Foundation, created to fund these business incentives.

The GCI is an informal and independent coalition of leaders of organizations both non-profit and for-profit, community associations and government agencies, Washington College and other interested groups and individuals. Among its projects have been supporting the town’s application for an Arts & Entertainment District designation from the Maryland State Arts Council,creating additional tourist events and additional Saturday and Sunday activities for First Friday weekends.

 

CBMM’s Draketail Project Wrapping Up, Summer Splash Anticipated

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Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum Boatyard Program Manager Jenn Kuhn reports work continues in CBMM’s boatshop on the construction of the 25’ draketail Pintail. Construction began mid-January 2016 through CBMM’s Apprentice for a Day public boatbuilding program, with an early summer splash now anticipated.

Participants in the CBMM’s Apprentice for a Day recently set the two-cylinder Yanmar diesel engine in Pintail.

Pintail’s white oak duck walk, sapele coaming, sassafras oiled floorboards, marine plywood battery box, and mahogany seats have been constructed and installed by AFAD and Family Boatshop participants. Her two-cylinder Yanmar diesel engine has been set in place, awaiting the construction of the engine box, electronics panel, steering gear, and systems hook up. She has multiple coats of Z-spar Captains varnish on the rails and Marshalls Cove white semi-gloss oil based paint on the top sides and decks.

Pintail is available for purchase, with proceeds supporting the education, restoration, and exhibition programs of the non-profit museum. For more information about programs and the purchase of Pintail, contact Jenn Kuhn at 410-745-4980 or jkuhn@cbmm.org. See more photos of the project at bit.ly/CBMMPintail.

PRS Guitars’ Founder Receives Honorary Doctorate from Washington College

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Paul Reed Smith, founder and Managing General Partner of PRS Guitars, has received an Honorary Doctorate of Public Service from Maryland’s Washington College. The degree, which was in recognition of Paul’s significant achievements as an innovative and creative thinker, was presented to Smith by Washington College President Sheila Bair during a public ceremony on Thursday, April 13.

Paul was recognized for both PRS Guitars, his successful business that has been designing and manufacturing electric guitars and basses, acoustic guitars, and amplifiers for some of the world’s most prestigious musicians for more than 30 years, and also his new cutting-edge company: Digital Harmonic, LLC, which marries art and science with developed image and waveform technology.
“Paul is a remarkable example of entrepreneurial spirit; a kid builds a guitar in high school woodshop and ends up as Managing Partner and Founder of the third largest guitar manufacturer in the US. Many would tell you that the company makes the best electric guitars that have ever been made,” said George Spilich, a professor of psychology and director of the Cromwell Center for Teaching and Learning at Washington College who treasures his own PRS guitar. “Now Paul is taking his expertise in signal processing and pivoting that knowledge into the creation of a signal processing company that has the promise of greatly improving medical imaging. If all that does not merit recognition in the business world, I don’t know what does.”

“I am very appreciative to be recognized by the Department of Business Management at Washington College,” said Paul Reed Smith. “I hope it serves as inspiration to the students, that regardless of where you start, things are possible with determination, a plan and great work ethics.”

Paul joins a prestigious circle of honorary degree recipients that includes U.S. Presidents (including George Washington) and nationally renowned scientists, writers, artists, historians, and statesmen. Paul has visited Washington College on several occasions, offering master classes in music, and performing with the Paul Reed Smith Band.

Aside from Smith’s professional success, he is also dedicated to giving back to the community through PRS Guitars’ fundraising efforts for the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Living with Cancer program and his mentorship program, which he personally has delivered at dozens of area secondary schools and colleges including Washington College. The mentorship program, which is largely funded by Smith himself, focuses on achieving goals and dreams through positive work ethics and responsibility. Paul is convinced that if he can reach even one student at each program that it is worth his time and effort.

Maryland 3.0: Screaming and Shaking at Justine’s with Tyler Heim

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There is something rather extraordinary about a small town ice cream parlor. It inevitably strikes a nerve of memory and nostalgia for many Americans as they recall their families special trips in the early evening of summer to the local stand on Main Street.

And one of those very special places is Justine’s Ice Cream Parlour in St. Michaels.

Known for having the longest lines in town during the summer months, including those eager to visit the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum. Justine’s over the last 30 years has become on those iconic snapshots of life on the Eastern Shore.

But behind the counter is another great American story of young entrepreneurs taking the concept of the summer ice cream place to an entirely different level. And that was the motivation behind the Spy’s recent interview with ice cream maker Tyler Heim,who, along with his brother, Jared, has been managing Justine’s for the store’s owner (and aunt) Kathleen Lash over the last few years.

When we talked to Tyler last week in the store last week, Tyler gave us an excellent overview of the world of local ice cream, the art of milkshake making, and plans to scale up the Justine brand in the years ahead.

This video is approximately three minutes in length. For more information on Justine’s please go here. Maryland 3.0 is an ongoing Spy series on entrepreneurship on the Mid-Shore. 

Chesapeake Bank and Trust Announces New Branch Manager

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Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company is pleased to announce its new Branch Manager, Karyn Dustin, who is replacing retiring Manager Mary Clark.

Karyn Dustin brings fourteen years of retail banking experience to Chesapeake Bank and Trust. Most recently Karyn was a Branch Manager in Easton, MD. Prior to that she was a Branch Administration Manager in Chestertown. Along with an impressive background in banking, Karyn has proven herself to be of the highest caliber when it comes to providing customer service.

“Karen is an experienced community banker who is glad to be back in Chestertown as part of our team.” – Glenn L. Wilson, President & CEO

A graduate of Boston University, Dustin lives in Centreville with her husband Steve. Dustin has also successfully graduated from the Maryland School of Banking which is a highly impressive achievement.

Founded in 1986, Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company, Chestertown’s Truly Local Banking Experience, has roots in Kent County dating back more than 100 years. Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company is a well-known pillar in the community, helping residents and businesses with their banking and investments needs. For more information please visit www.chesapeaketrust.com or call (410) 778-1600.

The 22nd Spring Career & Job Expo April 11

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Save the Date for the 22nd Spring Career & Job Expo on April 11, 2017, 2 – 5 p.m., at Chesapeake College, HPAC.

It has been 22 years since we began coordinating the largest job match opportunity for job seekers and employers in the Upper Shore region!  We are again celebrating the best prospect for facilitating this event for meeting one another with our upcoming, five-county 22nd Annual Spring Career & Job Expo!  This free event represents the best place to meet the most employers in one single afternoon in our five-county area – employers who are interested in what you can do!  Competition will be fierce again this year as more and more job seekers flood the employment market.  You will need to articulate your skills, knowledge, talents, experience and abilities with your best effort for this local area network of employers who are all in recruitment and hiring mode!

This is your homework assignment:  prepare yourself to meet with employers by practicing with one of our local American Job Center staff to update your resume, practice your introduction and research the businesses in our area.  Dress for success and bring several copies of your resume with you.  Keep an eye out for the list of employers who are coming so you can look them up and understand their product and the jobs for which they recruit – everyone has a website!  Have you applied on-line recently for any jobs?  The local American Job Center can help you!  Do you have a short script ready to talk about your skills and experience?  Practice!  What about job applications?  How about that handshake?  Eye contact?  You’re going to shine!

Practice makes perfect – come to the American Job Center and let us assist you.  Follow us on facebook to get the most current job listings in our area.

Looking for work is a hard job…let us help! www.uswib.org

Sponsored by Chesapeake College, the Upper Shore WIOA & American Job Center Network, including Adult Ed, DORS, DWDAL & DSS Organizations

Maryland 3.0: Sprouts Starts to Take Over the Eastern Shore

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Just so you know….perhaps one of the most significant “foodie” experiments in the country is taking place on the Mid-Shore.

A young couple, primarily trained in nutritional science and fitness, decide to escape the rat race of the Western Shore and relocate to Trappe to start a food delivery business dedicated to high quality prepared meals with locally sourced produce and meat.

The concept was simple. Rather than send clients the raw materials to make a nutritious meal (think Blue Apron), Sprout owners Ryan and Emily Groll would take it to the next level and actually cook the meals for its customers.

Sprout would do all the work. Whether it be breakfast, lunch, dinner, or even a snack, Ryan and Emily identify local farmers within a 200-mile range that produce some of the most exquisite examples of fruit, vegetables, chicken, pork, or beef in the region to produce meals that could be left at your doorstep twice a week.

Fast-forward one year later Sprouts has become an increasingly important provider on the entire Eastern Shore as well is in Annapolis. With Ryan’s mother in Chestertown, the couple continues to seek a local partner to help as a delivery station, which they call a “Sproutlet,” but they hope to cover the entire Mid-Shore within the next two years.

The Spy spent some quality time with Ryan in his portable kitchen in Trappe to discuss the couple’s courage and conviction it took to start a business of this kind and their aspirations over the next few years.

This video is approximately four minutes in length. For more information about Sprouts please go here

WC Lecture Re-Examines Famous Indian Captivity Narrative from the 17th Century

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One of the most famous, the most studied, the most reprinted, and the most anthologized of all early American texts is Mary Rowlandson’s story. Her narrative is the earliest surviving account of Indian captivity written by a European colonist in the British Colonies of North America.

DeProspoRichard De Prospo, professor of English and American Studies at Washington College, questions whether this well-known account is really a narrative at all. Indeed, have we been overselling Mary Rowlandson’s seventeenth-century account of Indian captivity to our 21st-century undergraduates?

De Prospo’s presentation,sponsored by the C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, starts at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 21 in the Sophie Kerr Room, Miller Library, Washington College. The event is free and open to the public and will be followed by a light reception.

A highly successful author, De Prospo’s books include The Latest Early American Literature (2015), The Stowe DebateRhetorical Strategies in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, with Mason Lowance and Ellen Westbrook (1994), and Theism in the Discourse of Jonathan Edwards (1985). He has published numerous articles that can be found on his Washington College profile. De Prospo began teaching at Washington College in 1975; he has also been visiting professor of literary theory at the University of New Hampshire and of early American literature at the University of London.