Chester River Chorale Rehearsing More Than Song

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Members of the Chester River Chorale have been belting out show stoppers or crooning love songs in the spring for almost two decades, but can the singers dance too? You can find out when “Hooray for Hollywood!” is presented at Washington College’s Decker Theater at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 28th and 29th.

A few of the 90-plus Chorale members in the show have been taking dance lessons from Greg Minahan, who has brought his Broadway chops to lead the singers through their paces in moves choreographed by the Chorale’s own dance professional, alto Karen Lynn Smith, who directed the dance program at Washington College before retirement.

Minahan, who was a guest artist last spring in the Chorale’s “Shakespeare’s Songbook,” will serve as the song-and-dance master of ceremonies, soloing with an umbrella in “Singin’ in the Rain,” and leading the Chorale’s Hooray for Hollywood dancers in ballroom turns for “Cheek to Cheek” and some Snoopy-inspired boogying in “Better When I’m Dancin’.”

A bonus will be an interlude of movie themes by Maryland jazz and classical guitarist Tom Lagana.

The show marks the second year in a row that the Washington College Music Department has sponsored the Chorale’s spring show and helped put it on at the college’s Gibson Center for the Arts. Ken Schweitzer, chair of the Music Department, will serve as a percussionist as well as host.

The musical program, put together by Artistic Director Doug Cox and accompanied by the Chorale’s Sam Marshall, raises the curtain with Richard Roger’s “It’s a Grand Night for Singing” (from 1945’s State Fair) and concludes with the stirring rhythms of Carly Simon’s “Let the River Run” (from 1989’s Working Girl).

Cox said he loves the music he chose “not for its tie to the Silver Screen, but rather for the memories I have whenever I hear it,” adding that the songs “are part of my personal life soundtrack.”

Tickets are $15—with students and children free—and will be available at the door in the Gibson Center for the Arts and are available in advance from the Chorale’s website, www.chesterriverchorale.org.

The Chester River Chorale is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization funded in part by Yerkes Construction Co., the Hedgelawn Foundation, the Mid-Shore Community Foundation, the Kent County Arts Council and the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency dedicated to cultivating a vibrant cultural community where the arts thrive.

The CRC’s mission is to provide opportunity, education, and inspiration for amateur singers to strive for artistic excellence. our performances entertain diverse audiences and enrich the cultural life of the community. We can only succeed with the help of you, our audience. For more information visit www.chesterriverchorale.org; check out the Chorale on Facebook, or call 410–928–5566.

Project Clean Stream on April 30

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Some volunteers take to canoes to clean up the rive, but most remove trash from the shoreline. Either way, come join the fun and make an impact in your community.

Let’s give the Corsica River a good spring cleaning!

The Corsica River Conservancy is seeking volunteers for the annual “Project Clean Stream” to pick up trash and debris from the watershed Sunday, April 30, from Noon to 4 p.m. (rain or shine).

Meet up with friends and neighbors at one of three clean-up locations in Centreville: Millstream Park at 416 S. Liberty St., Centreville Wharf at 101 Water Way, or Northbrook at 301 Trickling Brook Way.

Gloves and trash containers will be provided.

The event is sponsored by the Corsica River Conservancy, Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay and the Town of Centreville.

For more information visit www.corsicariverconservancy.org.

Permaculture Profits: Integrating Specialty Crop Production & Livestock Management

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Future Harvest CASA in partnership with the Eastern Shore Resource Conservation & Development Council is offering an on-farm education day on April 28th, 10:00 am to 2:00 pm.

Join us at Perennial Roots Farm, 23345 Decormis Street, Accomac, Virginia, to learn about permaculture, specialty crop production, and integrated pasture management. Owners Stewart Lundy and Natalie McGill will share their experience raising vegetables, flowers, eggs, and meat for local markets. VSU Extension Agent Patrick Johnson will discuss his research utilizing permaculture in intensive vegetable production. We will also offer an optional hands-on barrel composting workshop. Be prepared for hands-on work with gloves and muck boots. The educational program will be followed by a potluck lunch.

Tickets are $10 for FHCASA members and $15 for non-members. Register online at prfieldday.eventbrite.com or by contacting Niamh Shortt at niamh@futureharvestcasa.org. For scholarship information, contact Josephine: 757-710-7266.

Chester River Chorale Singers Rehearsing More Than Song

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The Chester River Chorale has been singing up a storm for almost two decades, but can they dance too? You can find out when “Hooray for Hollywood!” is presented at Washington College’s Decker Theater at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 28th and 29th.

Actor Greg Minahan shows the Chorale singers how to dance it up.

Some members of the 95-voice Chorale have been taking dance lessons from Greg Minahan who has brought his Broadway chops to lead the singers through their paces in dance moves choreographed by the Chorale’s own dance professional, Alto Karen Lynn Smith.

Minahan will serve as the song and dance master of ceremonies, soloing with an umbrella in “Singin’ in the Rain” and leading the Chorale’s Hollywood Troupe in ballroom turns for “Cheek to Cheek” and some Snoopy-inspired boogying in “Better When I’m Dancin’.”

A bonus will be an interlude of movie themes by Maryland guitarist Tom Lagana.

The musical program, put together by Artistic Director Doug Cox and accompanied by the Chorale’s Sam Marshall, raises the curtain with Richard Roger’s “It’s a Grand Night for Singing” (from 1945’s State Fair) and concludes with the stirring rhythms of Carly Simon’s “Let the River Run” (from 1989’s Working Girl).

Tickets are $15 and will be available at the door in the Gibson Center for the Arts and in advance from the Chorale’s website, www.chesterriverchorale.org.

Local Horizons Teacher Randy Decker Wins National Teaching Award

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Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s—a summer academic and enrichment program for underprivileged students—has announced that Middle School Head Teacher, Randy Decker, received the esteemed Lyn McNaught Teaching Award at this week’s Horizons National Conference in Greenwich, CT. The award honors educators who serve as role models for students and colleagues; provide a nurturing classroom environment that recognizes different learning styles; and create curriculum that is creative, challenging, and exciting to the students. At the conference, Mr. Decker was given the opportunity to address the attendees, who come from Horizons locations across the country.

“Randy Decker is an amazing dynamo of teaching excellence,” says Bob Parks, Executive Director of Horizons of Kent & Queen Anne’s. “He uses every available resource to enrich his students’ learning experiences–from field trips to visits from authors of books the students are reading. Not only has he created an exciting learning environment that keeps students engaged, he has inspired the staff with his commitment to Horizons goals. Randy epitomizes the kind of teacher who makes Horizons successful for students.”

A member of the Horizons family for four summers, Decker started as a fourth grade teacher and soon began sharing his passion for sailing with his students through sailing lessons. In his second summer, Randy designed and implemented a cutting-edge middle school program at Washington College using STEM, LEGO robotics, code.org, and literacy initiatives—enabling students to grow academically and engage in the learning process.

About Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s
Since 1995, Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s has served hundreds of underprivileged children on the campuses of The Gunston School, Radcliffe Creek School, and Washington College. The six-week summer program serves over 150 local children from pre-K through eighth grade, and focuses on reading, writing, and math. Students improve academically, learn to swim, and participate in activities that foster creativity, confidence, citizenship, and good health. Learn more at: http://horizonskentqueenannes.org/

About Horizons National
Horizons National is an award-winning, tuition-free, academic and enrichment program serving low-income, public school students from Pre-K through high school on the campuses of independent schools, colleges, and universities across the country. Started in 1964, and expanding nationally since 1995, Horizons programs now serve thousands of students in 51 sites across 17 states. Learn more at: https://www.horizonsnational.org

Outdoor Sunrise Easter Service Planned at Retreat House Hillsboro

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Holy Week will be observed at The Retreat House at Hillsboro with several events, ending with an outdoor sunrise service on Easter Sunday at 6:30 a.m. The Retreat House is on the grounds of historic St. Paul’s Church, part of the Episcopal Diocese of Easton.

Good Friday, April 14, will be commemorated from 12:00 to 3:00 p.m. with “Sacred Silence.” For those who wish to walk the labyrinth or sit in silence, the Retreat House grounds and St. Paul’s Church will be open. At 5:00 p.m. a traditional one-hour service will be held observing the liturgy of Good Friday, led by the Reverend Marianne Ell.

On Holy Saturday, April 15, a 7:30 p.m. service will be held in the church to mark the beginning of the Easter Vigil. Known as “Waiting and Watching,” the service includes the telling of sacred stories of the Christian faith, followed by time for silent prayer and meditation.

Easter Sunday’s Sunrise Service will be held in the churchyard with the kindling of a sacred fire, a blessing of the paschal candle and Eucharist. After the service, a potluck breakfast will be held in the Retreat House. All are welcome to attend any of the functions.

Located on the grounds of historic St. Paul’s Church at 22005 Church Street, Hillsboro, Maryland, the Retreat House is open for group retreats and meetings, individual hermitages, meditation and any who seek a spiritual connection. A traditional Chartres-style walking labyrinth is always open for walking and prayer. The Retreat House at Hillsboro is a ministry of the Diocese of Easton, MD. For more information contact Francie Thayer, Director, at (410) 364-7042, info@retreathouse.org, or visit us on Facebook.com/RetreatHouseAtHillsboro.

“Spring Splash” Party in Fountain Park Saturday April 8

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The Town of Chestertown will turn on the Hebe fountain in Fountain Park this Saturday, April 8, and Main Street Chestertown will celebrate the first splash by hosting a special ceremony and a family-friendly party. Called “Spring Splash,” the event will run from noon to 2:00 p.m. in Fountain Park and will feature a moon bounce, face painting, music, popcorn, lemonade, and Papa Smurf’s food truck.

Mayor Chris Cerino and the goddess Hebe (the Greek goddess of youth who is depicted in the statue atop the fountain), portrayed by Melissa McGlynn, will participate in the ceremony.

Also taking place downtown will be a Spring Cleaning Sale, with many merchants and restaurants participating.

Chesapeake Bank and Trust Announces New Branch Manager

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Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company is pleased to announce its new Branch Manager, Karyn Dustin, who is replacing retiring Manager Mary Clark.

Karyn Dustin brings fourteen years of retail banking experience to Chesapeake Bank and Trust. Most recently Karyn was a Branch Manager in Easton, MD. Prior to that she was a Branch Administration Manager in Chestertown. Along with an impressive background in banking, Karyn has proven herself to be of the highest caliber when it comes to providing customer service.

“Karen is an experienced community banker who is glad to be back in Chestertown as part of our team.” – Glenn L. Wilson, President & CEO

A graduate of Boston University, Dustin lives in Centreville with her husband Steve. Dustin has also successfully graduated from the Maryland School of Banking which is a highly impressive achievement.

Founded in 1986, Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company, Chestertown’s Truly Local Banking Experience, has roots in Kent County dating back more than 100 years. Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company is a well-known pillar in the community, helping residents and businesses with their banking and investments needs. For more information please visit www.chesapeaketrust.com or call (410) 778-1600.

April is National Alcohol Awareness Month

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While the use of heroin dominates our news, alcohol remains the most commonly used and abused substance among our youth. According to the latest youth survey, about 65 percent of Talbot County high school students have had at least one drink. And, about 12 percent of our high schoolers have driven after drinking.

Parents are a powerful source of positive and reliable information. In fact, research has shown that kids who have conversations with their parents and learn a lot about the dangers of alcohol and drug use are 50 percent less likely to use these substances than those who don’t have such conversations.

According to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, here are some guidelines that can help parents talk about alcohol and drug use:

Listen before you talk: For kids, knowing that someone is really listening is most important. Ask open-ended questions. Be involved. Be honest and open. Be positive: talking about these issues can build bridges rather than walls. And remember, addiction is a chronic, progressive disease that can be linked to family history and genetics. So, if you there is a family history of problems be matter of fact about it, as one would be with any other chronic disease, such as heart disease, diabetes or cancer.

The longer children can delay drinking and drug use, the less likely they are to develop problems.Parents can make a difference – that’s why it is so important to help your child connect the dots and make smart decisions about alcohol and drug use.

To learn more about how to prevent alcohol and drug abuse in your child, contact Alexandra Duff, Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Prevention Coordinator at Talbot County Health Department, at 410-819-5600.

The Talbot County Health Department Prevention Office helps community groups, agencies and individuals in providing programs and activities to prevent alcohol, tobacco and other drug abuse, and to build a healthier community. Resources include parenting skills, video and resource loan library, awareness campaigns and educational workshops.