“Scale – A Matter of Perspective” Exhibit at Massoni Art

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Mother Earth by Greg Mort

Everyone is invited for the exhibition of SCALE – A Matter of Perspective at Massoni Art, from January 19 to March 4, 2018. The exhibit features gallery artists: Heidi Fowler, Blake Conroy, Ken Schiano, Marcy Dunn Ramsey, Alessandra Manzotti, Grace Mitchell, Greg Mort, Jon Mort, Anne Nielsen, Eve Stockton, Vicco von Voss, Zemma Mastin White, and special guest artists.

Little did we know when selecting SCALE as the title for our January exhibition that we would be following in the footsteps of the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture. Our points of departure vary but the theme resonates for both.

Harvard’s exhibition examines the concept of scale and its power to transform perceptions of the world and our place in it.

“Scale has long captivated the human imagination, as evidenced in classics such as Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and in today’s popular movies and television shows. Featuring a wide selection of microscopes and telescopes from the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments and an array o fmodels, miniatures, and cultural and scientific artifacts from collections across the University, the exhibition will challenge visitors to make connections to the world in surprising new ways.” HMSC

The gallery title was initially inspired by a simple contemplation of how artists convey meaning in the scale they choose to create a work of art. Will it be large or small, or somewhere in between? How is this related to the way we measure the importance of things, i.e., on a scale of one to ten or by concepts such as greater or lesser?

The work of many of the artists we are showcasing reflects significant environmental concerns, concerns shared by many other disciplines worldwide. The scale of the problems we contemplate is enormous, but artists are bound by physical realities to a relatively small physical scale. Can something very small still convey a “greater” meaning? This is perhaps the artist’s challenge.

Harvard chose to highlight the tools and artifacts created by man to understand scale and thereby challenge their audience to make connections to the world in new ways. Artists bring their individual skills and creativity to provide a response to this question. Transforming perceptions of the world and our place in it serves as a catalyst and a vast canvas for the voice of the artist.

To see the world in a grain of sand, And a heaven in a wild flower; Hold infinity in the palm of your hand And eternity in an hour.

“To See a World….” (Fragments from “Auguries of Innocence”) William Blake

The Chester River Chorale 20th Season Begins

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The Chester River Chorale invites all who love to sing to join us for our spring season as we begin rehearsals in Heron Point’s Wesley Hall at 6 p.m. Monday January 15 for our mid-April spring concert.

We welcome all adult voices to join with our ninety-plus members—ranging in age from 18 to over 80—for our 20th consecutive season as the Upper Shore’s premier chorus. No audition is required. Dues are $50 with students free. The dues help pay for the music we provide.

Artistic Director Doug Cox has put together another spring program that promises to be great fun to sing. It is called “Leaves of Bluegrass,” and is centered around a cantata-length Te Deum backed by The High and Wides bluegrass string band.

Rehearsals will be every Monday evening at Heron Point.

A bonus for Chorale members is a chance to sing the Mozart Requiem with the National Music Festival orchestra in June.

Chorale members are amateur singers drawn mainly from Kent and Queen Anne’s counties.

The Chester River Chorale is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization funded in part by the Kent County Arts Council and by an operating grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency dedicated to cultivating a vibrant cultural community where the arts thrive.

The CRC’s mission is to provide opportunity, education, and inspiration for amateur singers to strive for artistic excellence. CRC performances entertain diverse audiences and enrich the cultural life of the community. For more information, visit www.chesterriverchorale.org or call 410–928-5566.

Haven Ministries Expands Housing Assistance Program

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Haven Ministries has served 18 guests at its designated space at Kent Island United Methodist Church at 2739 Cox Neck Road in Chester since the Shelter opened in October. The Shelter will remain open until April 2018.  According to Krista Pettit, Executive Director of Haven Ministries, the Shelter has been at full or near capacity for much of the season and has had occasion to turn away individuals due to full capacity conditions.

The organization has identified the need for a more permanent affordable Housing Assistance Program. Pettit adds, “The next step for many of our guests is for more long-term housing, until more permanent housing becomes available for them.”

Pictured is Sandi Wiscott, Haven Ministries Director of Operations, with Shelter guest.

Haven Ministries Housing Assistance Program has two components: the housing component and the case management component.  Pettit explains that Haven Ministries will structure the housing component so that guests pay for use of the home and utilities, while receiving case management assistance for budgeting, employment, and health management.

Pettit states, “Our goal is to help our guests get to the next step of permanency. A Housing Assistance Program will enable them to do that.”

Haven Ministries has a short-term goal to find a home or property for its Housing Assistance Program, with a longer-term goal of building a home to accommodate its guests.

Love shapes the ministry, love transforms people, and hope prevails at Haven Ministries.  Haven Ministries operates a Resource Center at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Centreville, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. with job training, educational programming, and case management services.  The Haven Ministries Food Pantry is held on the third Friday monthly at Safe Harbor Presbyterian Church in Stevensville from 5:30 to 7 p.m.  Our Daily Thread Thrift Store is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For further information about Haven Ministries, visit haven-ministries.org or call 410-739-4363.

The Artists’ Gallery to Stay Open for Second Friday!

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Due to weather conditions on our most recent First Friday, many of the galleries and businesses in Chestertown did not remain open. To make up for being closed, the partners of The Artists’ Gallery would like to invite everyone to join them in celebration of Second Friday!   In addition to a warm reception, the partners of The Artists’ Gallery are extending the 15% off sale of their original work through January 20th.  The partners of the gallery are Bonnie Foster Howell, Sally Clark, Nancy R. Thomas, Barbara Zuehlke and Evie Baskin.  For more information about the partners and the work that they do, please see the gallery website at: theartistsgalleryctown.com.

“Rippled Edge,” oil by Bonnie Howell

In addition, The Artists’ Gallery will also offer a discount of 15% on paintings by Linda Hall.  Based in Betterton, Linda Hall’s work is well known on the Eastern Shore and beyond.  She has participated in numerous juried art shows, both nationally and internationally, winning over fifty awards.  Linda is a signature member of the Baltimore Watercolor Society, Pennsylvania Watercolor Society and the Northeast Watercolor society and an exhibitor with The Artists’ Gallery, and a member of River Arts and the Working Artists Forum in Easton.

The public is invited to a reception at The Artists’ Gallery on January 12, 2018 from 5-8 pm.  Located at 239 High Street in Chestertown, The Artists’ Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10-5 and on Sundays from 12:30 to 4:30.

Chesapeake Bank and Trust Promotes Robert Thompson to Senior Vice President

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Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company is pleased to announce Robert Thompson’s promotion to Senior Vice President.

“Rob is an excellent community banker. He is well known in Kent County, and is well liked by our clients for his expertise and responsiveness. This promotion is very well deserved” – Glenn L. Wilson, President & CEO

Robert Thompson is Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company’s (CB&T) Senior Lending Officer, and has worked at the bank for over ten years. He joined CB&T in 2005 as a Loan Officer Trainee, became a seasoned Lending Officer, and was promoted to Vice President & Senior Lender in 2015. Thompson’s clients can be comforted and know that they are receiving the highest level of service and knowledge when they work with him.

A graduate of James Madison University, with a B.S. in Engineering and Manufacturing from the Integrated Science and Technology Program and of Kent County High School, Thompson lives in Worton with his wife Jessica and their daughter.

Founded in 1986, Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company, Chestertown’s Truly Local Banking Experience, has roots in Kent County dating back more than 100 years. Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company is a well-known pillar in the community, helping residents and businesses with their banking and investments needs. For more information please visit www.chesapeaketrust.com or call (410) 778-1600.

Open Letter to Annapolis: Let Chestertown Have a “Special Rural Community Hospital”

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We represent the Chestertown-centered physician/community effort known as “Save Our Hospital.” As we approach the start of the General Assembly, our goal is to ensure that, with your leadership, the hospital in Chestertown will become a “Special Rural Community Hospital” as recommended by the Legislative Workgroup on Rural Health Care Delivery. That designation will, we are told, ensure that our hospital will continue to serve this community as an inpatient facility.

While our community has focused on retaining inpatient medical and surgical care in Chestertown, we want to make it clear that we support the entire Final Report of the Workgroup, led by co-chairs Joseph Ciotola, M.D., and Deborah Mizeur, administered by the Health Care Commission, and enhanced with research by the University of Maryland School of Public Health and the Walsh Center for Rural Health Analysis.

We agree with the report’s conclusion that Maryland will well serve its rural communities and take a giant step toward becoming a national rural health leader with policies that:

foster collaboration and build coalitions in rural areas to serve rural communities; bring care as close to the patient as possible to improve access; and  foster participation in statewide models and programs in rural Maryland.

You are likely aware of the unwavering effort to retain hospital services for Kent and Northern Queen Anne’s Counties, begun in late 2015 when we learned of plans to eliminate in-patient care in Chestertown and reduce the facility to a free-standing medical facility.

We publicized those plans in a full-page ad signed by 31 (virtually all) local physicians in December of 2015, then explained our concerns at “The Firehouse Meeting” attended by more than 500 area residents in January. In follow-up action, often covered by Eastern Shore and Baltimore media, more than 5,000 locals signed a petition asking UM Shore Regional Health to retain inpatient services and return lost services; 1,000 people sent postcards to Governor Hogan; and many attended and testified at General Assembly hearings.

The result was the unanimous passage of SB-707 in both Houses, thanks to Senator Hershey and our Mid-Shore delegation, and thanks to Senator Middleton’s belief that all Maryland residents should have access to high quality health care. The bill, signed by Governor Hogan, saved our hospital at least until 2020 and established the Workgroup. We cannot adequately express our gratitude for all you did to make that happen.

As the 2018 General Assembly approaches, rural hospitals in other states continue to close (more than 80 have closed since 2010), but UM Shore Regional Health System is now committed to maintaining the Chestertown hospital as an inpatient facility if the state will help with necessary financial support.

Please tell us what we and our neighbors can do to help secure a “Special Rural Community Hospital” designation so our community will have the accessible hospital care that we need.

With continued appreciation,

Gerard O’Connor, M.D. and Wayne Benjamin, M.D., Founders of “Save Our Hospital”
Kurt Landgraf, President, Washington College
Richard L. Goodall, Dixon Valve & Coupling Co.
William Pickrum, President, Kent County Commission
Garret Falcone, Director, Heron Point Retirement Community
Glenn Wilson, President, Chesapeake Bank & Trust
CEO Chris Cerino, Mayor,  Chestertown, Maryland

 

The Chester River Chorale 20th Season Begins

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The Chester River Chorale invites all who love to sing to join us for our spring season as we begin rehearsals in Heron Point’s Wesley Hall at 6 p.m. Monday January 15 for our mid-April spring concert.

We welcome all adult voices to join with our ninety-plus members—ranging in age from 18 to over 80—for our 20th consecutive season as the Upper Shore’s premier chorus. No audition is required. Dues are $50 with students free. The dues help pay for the music we provide.

Artistic Director Doug Cox has put together another spring program that promises to be great fun to sing. It is called “Leaves of Bluegrass,” and is centered around a cantata-length Te Deum backed by The High and Wides bluegrass string band.

Rehearsals will be every Monday evening at Heron Point.

A bonus for Chorale members is a chance to sing the Mozart Requiem with the National Music Festival orchestra in June.

Chorale members are amateur singers drawn mainly from Kent and Queen Anne’s counties.

The Chester River Chorale is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization funded in part by the Kent County Arts Council and by an operating grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency dedicated to cultivating a vibrant cultural community where the arts thrive.

The CRC’s mission is to provide opportunity, education, and inspiration for amateur singers to strive for artistic excellence. CRC performances entertain diverse audiences and enrich the cultural life of the community. For more information, visit www.chesterriverchorale.org or call 410–928-5566.

The Artists’ Gallery Opens for First Friday!

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On First Friday, The Artists’ Gallery would like to invite everyone to celebrate the new year with them!  Along with their well wishes, the partners of The Artists’ Gallery are offering a discount of 15% off each of their original works of art during the first two weeks of January.  The partners of the gallery are Bonnie Foster Howell, Sally Clark, Nancy R. Thomas, Barbara Zuehlke and Evie Baskin.  For more information about the partners and the work that they do, please see the gallery website at: theartistsgalleryctown.com.

“Koi Fish Frolicking”, mixed media by Sally Clark

In addition, The Artists’ Gallery will extend a discount of 15% on paintings by Linda Hall.  Based in Betterton, Linda Hall’s work in watercolor is well known on the Eastern Shore and beyond.  She has participated in numerous juried art shows, both nationally and internationally, winning over fifty awards.  Linda is a signature member of the Baltimore Watercolor Society, Pennsylvania Watercolor Society and the Northeast Watercolor society and an exhibitor with The Artists’ Gallery, and a member of River Arts and the Working Artists Forum in Easton.

A reception for the public will be held at The Artists’ Gallery on January 5, 2018 from 5-8 pm.  Located at 239 High Street in Chestertown, The Artists’ Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10-5 and on Sundays from 12:30 to 4:30.

Brevities: Driving in Kent County Before the Solstice

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Photo by Spy Agent 7 — 00 Section

Shelley and I drove north the morning of the day before the shortest day. We rolled through Kent County, commenting on its agreeable flatness, and the winter crops turning the brown fields green. We watched the sunrise orange through the trees, flickering by as it developed its full size. It rose through a gap at the horizon and colored the rest of the heavily clouded sky with a pearl gray.

Shelley first noticed the dark lines low on the horizon. As we approached, it became clear it was thousands and thousands of geese in plumps of a couple hundred. As we got nearer, they appeared to be more overhead, and we could easily see the white bodies and black wing tips of snow geese in their asymmetric vees – none on the ground, all in the air.

The line of geese stretched for miles to the right and left, flickering randomly as the wings rose and fell. An occasional single goose or three or four of them were flying against the flow in search of friends or cousins.

We had to stop for a moment for road construction, and when we rolled the window down, we heard them honking in their hundreds, directly overhead, white against the low gray sky.

Then­ we and the geese went our way.

By Ed Minch