Spy Moment: Adkins Arboretum Plays in the Meadow

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The weather gods were watching out for Adkins Arboretum last Saturday night for its annual Magic in the Meadow gala; an event far more dependent on good weather than most, given it celebrates the 400-acre native garden and preserve.

The gift of a perfect, cool evening was awarded that evening as guests enjoyed the hoop dance performance by Baltimore artist Melissa Newman and the jazz of the Peter Revell Band, while Adkins friends and supporters lined up for hiking trails, tours, plant shopping, and auction bidding all accompanied by a Piazza-sponsored dinner and wine selection.

The Spy was there with a camera to capture this reconnaissance video.

This video is approximately one minute in length. For more information about Adkins Arboretum please go here.

 

Sultana Education Foundation Partners with Gunston School for Chesapeake Watershed Semester Kickoff

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Free Public Presentation on Thursday, September 27, 6:00 PM, at Sultana Education Foundation

Join Director of Watershed Restoration and former Pennsylvania Executive Director of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Matt Ehrhart, for a free discussion on the Stroud Water  Research Center, a Pennsylvania non-profit that is leading the effort to help farmers use best management practices for whole farm restoration—preventing fresh water pollution in the Chesapeake Bay at its source.

Through extensive public and private partnerships as well as intensive outreach and education for farmers in the Chesapeake’s Pennsylvania freshwater tributaries, the Stroud Water Research Center helps landowners secure the best program funding to suit their farms and properties.

This talk is free to the public, with no registration required.

Sultana Education Foundation connects people to the Chesapeake Bay’s history, ecology, and culture, inspiring them to preserve and restore America’s largest estuary through land- and-water-based experiential education.  To learn more about Sultana Education Foundation’s public or school programs, visit sultanaeducation.org.

About the Sultana Education Foundation

Founded in 1997, the Sultana Education Foundation is a private nonprofit dedicated to providing unique, hands-on educational opportunities that promote stewardship of the Chesapeake Bay’s historic, cultural, and environmental legacies.   The Foundation is a two-time recipient of the National Maritime Historical Foundation’s Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Maritime Education.

Eliminate Litter and Enjoy Public Lands at Blackwater NWR

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Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is celebrating National Public Lands Day on Saturday, September 22, by hosting its annual volunteer litter cleanup day and offering free admission to the refuge. The public is invited to work with staff, Friends of Blackwater members and other volunteers as we clean up refuge roads to promote the health of the forest and wetlands. This year’s event is being held in conjunction with International Coastal Cleanup, a worldwide effort by the Ocean Conservancy to keep litter from entering our oceans. In addition, the usual entrance fee for Wildlife Drive will be waived so that everyone has an opportunity to enjoy their wonderful public lands!

Blackwater NWR’s annual litter cleanup will be held on September 22 from 9:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.  Trash will be collected from the roads around Blackwater NWR, beginning at the Blackwater Visitor Center, located on Key Wallace Drive near Cambridge.  Snacks and drinks will be supplied by the Friends of Blackwater for everyone who comes.  In addition, the first 30 people who register for this event will receive an appreciation gift.  Individuals and groups of all ages are invited, and low-traffic litter areas will be set aside for those with young children.  Participants are encouraged to bring gloves and wear brightly colored clothes for working along the roads.  If you, your family, or your organization is interested in registering for the Litter Pick-up please contact Tom Miller or Michele Whitbeck at 410-228-2677. Information about the refuge can be found at www.fws.gov/refuge/Blackwater.

More information about National Public Lands Day can be found at www.neefusa.org/npld.  If you wish to learn more about the International Coastal Cleanup, please visit www.oceanconservancy.org .

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, located on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, protects over 29,000 acres of rich tidal marsh, mixed hardwoods and pine forest, managed freshwater wetlands and cropland for a diversity of wildlife.  To learn more, visit our website at www.fws.gov/refuge/blackwater or follow us on Facebook @BlackwaterNWR.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

October Nature Walk Connects Faith and Environment

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Join ShoreRivers, an environmental nonprofit, and Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC), a faith-based advocacy group, for a Spiritual Nature Walk on Sunday, October 7, from 3-5 p.m. at the beautiful Bolingbroke Park in Trappe. ShoreRivers’ Choptank Riverkeeper Matt Pluta and IPC’s Religious Educator Kolya Braun-Greiner will guide a two-mile walk through the secluded forests that meander beside Bolingbroke Creek. All denominations and ages are welcome to join and learn more about the health of the Choptank River and the call to action that congregations can make to protect Creation.

Bolingbroke Park is a pristine, little known gem of the Eastern Shore, owned by the Izaak Walton League Mid-Shore Chapter. The park has bathrooms, walking trails, and a small boat launch. Join us for an afternoon of inspiration, fresh air, fall foliage, and connecting with your local environment and faith.

A view of Bolingbroke Creek from the Izaak Walton League Park in Trappe. Photo Credit: Izaak Walton League Mid-shore Chapter

This spiritual nature walk is offered through the Stewards for Streams: Faith-Based Conservation program funded by Chesapeake Bay Trust and Delaplaine Foundation. Through Stewards for Streams, local congregations have planted native rain gardens and trees that filter and clean rain water before entering local waterways, hosted rain barrel workshops, and engaged adult and youth groups in the importance of environmental stewardship.

Visit shorerivers.org and interfaithchesapeake.org for more information about these community organizations.

The Spiritual Nature Walk is limited to 25 people. Registration closes Thursday, October 5. To sign up, please call Suzanne Sullivan at 443-385-0511 or email ssullivan@shorerivers.org.

ShoreRivers protects and restores Eastern Shore waterways through science-based advocacy, restoration, and education. We work collaboratively with our community yet maintain an uncompromising and independent voice for clean rivers and the living resources they support.

shorerivers.org

Talbot County Council Proclaims 2018 the Year of the Bird

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The Talbot County Council has proclaimed 2018 as the Year of the Bird in Maryland. The declaration celebrates native and migratory birds making their way through Maryland this time of year and the Free State’s remarkable landscapes and water resources that support them.  The proclamation was delivered at the Council’s September 11th meeting at the Talbot County Public Library in Easton.

Audubon works with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Maryland State Department of Education on Governor Hogan’s Project Green Classrooms as well as with a host of local, state and federal agencies on important bird area protection, environmental literacy and sea level rise adaptation.

Home to 42 Important Bird Areas and more than 400 observed species, the declaration recognizes that Maryland and the Eastern Shore’s natural resources provide important habitat for birds. Within Maryland, the Chesapeake Bay watershed serves as an important breeding and stopover area for millions of migratory birds each year.

Pickering Creek Audubon Center Trustees David Bent and Tom Sanders, Audubon’s Mark Scallion, and County Council member Dirck Bartlett with the Talbot County Council’s Year of the Bird Proclamation.

People around the world are celebrating 2018 as Year of the Bird. This year marks the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, one of the oldest wildlife protection laws in the United States. In honor of this milestone, National Geographic, Audubon, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, BirdLife International, and dozens of other partners around the world joined forces to celebrate 2018 as the Year of the Bird.  This year’s Harvest Hoedown at Pickering Creek Audubon Center on October 14th will be themed after the Year of the Bird and feature bird activities as well as native plants for people to take home and install in there own yards.

“Year of the Bird is an easy way people can take small everyday actions to help birds along their journeys,” said David Yarnold, president and CEO for National Audubon Society. “Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay provides wintering grounds for approximately one-third of the Atlantic coast’s migratory population including iconic waterfowl species like the Tundra Swan, Canada Goose, Northern Pintail and Green-winged Teal for centuries.”

Many conservation organizations, agencies, businesses and academics have been instrumental in protecting birds and the places they need in Maryland. In celebrating 2018 as the Year of the Bird, there is great appreciation for the efforts of many organizations, including local Audubon chapters and centers, the Maryland Ornithological Society, the Department of Natural Resources, waterfowl associations and duck clubs, and many others. For more about Year of the Bird visit www.birdyourworld.org.

Contact: Mark Scallion, National Audubon Society, mscallion@audubon.org, 410-822-4903

The Annual Cardboard Boat Race on September 22

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It wouldn’t be Fall Family Weekend at Washington College without the annual Cardboard Boat Race, which is set to take place September 22 during the Center for Environment & Society’s “Get to Know CES Waterfront Festival.” As always, the public is invited to Wilmer Park from 1-4 p.m. to enjoy food, beer, live music, and the always entertaining Cardboard Boat Race. This year the event will take place immediately following the dedication of the new Hodson Boathouse, at 11:30, also open to the public.

CES staff will be on hand discussing, and sometimes demonstrating, their innovative and educational programs. Visit each booth for a chance to win a 90-minute cruise on the Chester River for up to ten people on the research vessel Callinectes, or a guided tour of beautiful River and Field Campus at Chino Farm, including Foreman’s Branch Bird Observatory and the native Grasslands Restoration Project. Stop by the trivia table to test your CES knowledge and win a T-shirt. Other activities include river cruises aboard the 46-foot Callinectes ($5 per person), kayaking, and paddle boarding on the Chester River.

The Cardboard Boat Race is open to individuals, businesses, schools, civic groups, and non-profit entities in Kent or Queen Anne’s counties. Over $650 in prizes will be awarded for the winners of categories including First Around the Course, Best Construction, Most Team Spirit, and the ever-popular People’s Choice. College President Kurt Landgraf and his wife, Rita, will be on hand to help with the judging.

The deadline for registration is September 20, and participants must be at least 12 years old. All boats go on display at 12:30 p.m. on race day. Captains and crew meet at 2:45 p.m., the popular boat parade begins at 2:50, and the race starts at 3:00 sharp along the Pavilion in Chestertown’s Wilmer Park.

Registration is at https://12annualcardboardboatrace.eventbrite.com and costs $15 per team. For boatbuilding tips, go to https://www.washcoll.edu/centers/ces/chestertown-riverfest/cardboard-boat-building-tips.php.

In case of foul weather, activities may be cancelled.  For information contact Jamie Frees at 410-810-7162, jfrees2@washcoll.edu or visit https://www.washcoll.edu/centers/ces/chestertown-riverfest/cardboard-boat-regatta.php. Events are organized by the Center for Environment & Society at Washington College for Fall Family Weekend.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Rod and Reef Slam Fishing Tournament Returns for Second Year

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Anglers seeking a unique experience on the Chesapeake Bay should register now for the second annual Rod & Reef Slam on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

The fishing tournament taking place Saturday, Sept. 22, on six oyster restoration sites near the mouth of the Choptank River, is meant to highlight the diversity of fish that thrive near oyster reefs. So rather than be rewarded for catching a specific large fish, anglers in this catch-and-release fishing tournament are tasked with trying to catch as many different species of fish to win prizes such as Engle coolers, Costa Sunglasses gift cards, Lyon Distilling Rum, and fishing tackle. If anglers tie on the number of species caught, the size of their fish will determine the winners.

Last year, anglers caught dozens of fish from 10 different species such as rockfish, white perch, weakfish and spotted seatrout.

“Historically the live bottom provided by three-dimensional oyster reefs produced an amazingly diverse fishing community,” said John Page Williams, Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s senior naturalist and a seasoned angler. “Our aim here is to bring that rich diversity back to our recreational and commercial fisheries. We are starting to see that return in the reef ball field in the Choptank River and other oyster restoration areas.”

The tournament takes place from 6:30 a.m. until fishing lines will be required to be out of the water at 2:30 p.m. An after party and awards show will take place from 3 to 6 p.m. at the Lowes Wharf Marina Inn in Sherwood. There are three divisions—powerboat, kayak, and youth. The entry fee is $50 for the powerboat and kayak division and youth can participate for free if they have a Coastal Conservation Association youth membership, which is $10 per year. The registration price covers the entry fee, after party food, giveaways, entertainment, and access to a cash bar. Tickets for just the afterparty are $10 and include food and entertainment.

The tournament is being co-sponsored by Chesapeake Bay Foundation, the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office, Coastal Conservation Association Maryland and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.The title sponsor is Curtis Stokes & Associates, Inc.

Participating anglers in this tournament will fish on their choice of six oyster restoration reef areas—Tilghman Island Reef just outside of Knapps Narrows, Clint Waters Reef at Cooks Point, reef balls at the Bill Burton Fishing Pier near Cambridge, and three different oyster sanctuaries in Harris Creek, the Tred Avon River and the Little Choptank River. Before releasing the fish they catch, anglers will use the iAngler app to record the size and location of their catch.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation in partnership with groups such as Coastal Conservation Association Maryland and NOAA have worked to preserve and grow oyster reefs in the Bay to improve water quality.  Oysters are a keystone species in the Chesapeake. They filter water and the crevices between the groupings of bivalves provide habitat for other critters such as small fish, crabs, and grass shrimp.

Small fish, such as blennies, gobies and skillet-fish that feed on the reef are natural bait for much bigger fish such as rockfish and perch as well as blue crabs.

The locations chosen for the fishing tournament are all places where conservation groups have planted hundreds of thousands of oysters over the past decade.  For example, this summer the Chesapeake Bay Foundation planted more than 120 reef ballsin the Choptank River, while more than 1,500 reef balls have been planted at Cook’s Point.

The Harris Creek oyster sanctuary is a productive example of restoration efforts. Since 2011, 350 acres of water bottom have been planted with oysters. A NOAA study released last year found that the vast majority of planted oysters were forming into stable, healthy reefs.

The Chesapeake Oyster Alliance, a group of more than 40 local and regional conservation groups, aquaculture businesses, and academic partners, is working to expand oyster populations in the Chesapeake by adding 10 billion new oysters in Virginia and Maryland waters by 2025.

However, more needs to be done to draw attention to the important water quality and recreational benefits oysters provide to the Chesapeake Bay. The Rod & Reef Slam is meant to remind people about the ecosystems oyster reefs create and the recreational fishing opportunities they can provide.

More information here or at 443-482-2097 or hgibson@cbf.org.

Ballerinas, Tights, and the Myth of the Conowingo Boogeyman by William Herb

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Motherhood, apple pie, and the Clean Chesapeake Coalition! What kind of curmudgeon could possibly find fault with such righteous-sounding institutions? But as Neal Hagburg writes in his song, If it ain’t you: “You ain’t a ballerina just because you like to wear tights when you dance”. Wearing the mantle of a clean Chesapeake doesn’t automatically make you a protector of the Bay.

The Clean Chesapeake Coalition (CCC), organized in 2012, comprises Caroline, Cecil, Carroll, Dorchester, Kent, and Queen Anne’s Counties. Membership consists entirely of government officials from these six counties. CCC’s stated objective is “to pursue improvements to the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay in the most prudent and fiscally responsible manner-through research, coordination, and advocacy.”

I just viewed the latest video produced by the CCC. While I wholeheartedly agree with their purported desire to have a clean Bay, I find that the video is quite misleading, and serves mainly to promote the hidden CCC agenda of reducing pollution-management efforts (but not pollution) in its member counties, while continually raising the specter of the mythical Conowingo Boogeyman. This is “whataboutism” writ environmentally. You know: “Yes, we do pollute our rivers and the Chesapeake Bay, but what about (insert Conowingo or your own favorite villain here)?” The parochial CCC view seems to be that preventing pollution locally is a waste of money, but it is money well spent if someone else foots the bill, regardless of culpability.

If the video is to be taken at face value, the only resource in danger in the Bay is the oyster, and watermen who harvest that particular bi-valve are the only stakeholders damaged by the Bay’s condition. Perhaps it is only Commissioner Fithian’s biases speaking. Yet he and the other Kent County Commissioners are willing to spend $25,000 per year of our tax dollars to promote such bogus ideas while, at the same time, proposing to eliminate fines for certain Critical Area violations. A clean Chesapeake, indeed!

The subject video is misleadingly entitled “The Conowingo Factor”, when in fact it should be titled “The Pennsylvania (and maybe New York) Factor”. I will admit that the new title doesn’t exactly trip off the tongue, but accuracy should count for something even in a time when truth isn’t truth. At the very end of the slick propaganda piece, after the talking heads are blessedly silenced, a text box does grudgingly grant that Pennsylvania is not doing enough to clean up the river before it reaches the Bay. Even that admission is prefaced by a cheap shot at Exelon for not taking part in a pilot dredging study begun by Maryland; a study with some promise, but one also fraught with pitfalls.

The Susquehanna River –the main tributary and source of the Chesapeake Bay–runs through New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland before emptying into the northern, top end of the Chesapeake Bay.     Map courtesy of Bay Journal

Let’s face it. Pennsylvania’s and New York’s contaminants are horrendous problems, and the CCC deserves props for pointing that out, as well as for flagging EPA’s blunder in failing to recognize the future impact of zero sediment trap efficiency of the Conowingo Dam and pond.

On the other hand, review the past tributary and Bay health scorecards and you will see that we residents along the Bay have not covered ourselves in glory when it comes to pollution. The best water in the Bay is just downstream from the mouth of the Susquehanna River. This relatively good quality owes no thanks to efforts by upstream states to cut sediment, nutrients, and other pollution, but rather is a testament to the free remediation that has been provided by the Conowingo Dam and pond for the past 8 decades. It seems that the CCC and many others simply want to disregard this happy coincidence. The power generation facility does not require clean water, but, as a by-product of its design, it has remediated the upstream mess for 80 years at no cost to the upstream polluters or the downstream beneficial users.

The same scorecards will reveal that when the relatively clean water enters the Bay, we Marylanders, including the residents of the six CCC Counties (C4), immediately begin to degrade it, and Virginians and DC residents are no better. Most of the contamination from the C4 is caused by agriculture, which does not have enforceable discharge limits (but which offers the most cost-effective way to reduce sediment and nutrient TMDLs). The Bay score stays low until the waterbody experiences flushing from the ocean via tides. Once again, a free remediation (natural, this time) helps clean up our misdeeds. We are all to blame for the quality of water in the Bay, and it is unconscionable to deflect the blame to others while trying to avoid our own responsibilities.

“The Susquehanna River, the Bay’s largest tributary, carries nutrient and sediment pollution from Pennsylvania and New York. Efforts to curtail a key nutrient, nitrogen, have fallen behind because of lagging cleanup progress in those two states, EPA says.” (Photo with caption from  Bay Journal article June 2016)

There are 3 major contaminants coming down the Susquehanna and all the other Bay tributaries: sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen. These are produced by processes and activities (natural or human) in the watersheds. Human activities predominate as causes of the contamination.

Assuming that cleaning up our own act here in Maryland makes sense, how should we view what is going to be happening in the near future when the Conowingo Dam and pond will no longer trap sediment as they have in the past? Let’s look at energy production as well as sediment and nutrient delivery to the Bay.

It is doubtful that there will be a significant impact on energy production. In a “run of the river” system such as Conowingo, energy production depends on the head (elevation) of water above the turbines, not on the scant amount of water stored behind the dam. Also, as previously noted, nutrients do not affect electricity production. So cleanup of other people’s pollution is not a driving economic factor for the owner and operator of Conowingo or for its customers and shareholders.

A reduction of nutrients in Bay waters will help promote the long-term increase in underwater grasses, which support fish, crabs, and waterfowl. (Photo by Dave Harp,  Courtesy of Bay Journal)

Nitrogen, which should be controlled at its upstream sources, is largely in solution, so the presence of the dam and pond have had no significant impact on delivery to the Bay, and if the dam’s sediment trap efficiency is reduced to zero, that will not change the situation.

Sediment is a huge problem. But the source of the problem is in the production of sediment in Pennsylvania and New York, and not a problem inherent in the dam and pond. The CCC makes much of the highly visible plume of sediment that passed through the dam following Tropical Storm Lee, but they conveniently neglect to mention that that plume would have been there without the dam or even if the dam had the trap efficiency of its heyday. Those extremely fine silts and clays pass through the Conowingo pond and dam like crap through a goose and remain suspended for miles downstream due to basic physics.

CCC also emphasizes the fact that 4 million tons of sediment were scoured out of the pond in Lee, but minimizes the fact that an additional 15 million tons came down from Pennsylvania and New York in the same flood event. They also tend to ignore the fact that 4 million tons of scour restored some of the sediment trapping capacity for future storms.

Phosphorus, which should be controlled at its upstream sources, is carried on the surface of sediments, and will be delivered to the Bay in increasing amounts if nothing happens at the dam. But the impact will look almost exactly like what would happen if no dam were in place at all. During its previous history of free remediation, the Conowingo Dam and pond captured about 40 per cent of the phosphorus coming down the Susquehanna.

The proposed pilot dredging study may provide some useful information. However, there are a number of questions that must be answered before large-scale dredging should be considered as a viable solution. Is there a beneficial use for 280 million tons of sediment contaminated with phosphorus, coal, PCBs, radio-nuclides from Three Mile Island, heavy metals, and other potentially hazardous materials? Is there any place, within practical distance, that will accept the materials? Will any beneficial uses offset the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers estimate of $4 billion for complete dredging?

If these questions can be positively answered, and the cost is considered to be acceptable, the question is: who should pay for the dredging? Is it billed to the potentially responsible parties in Pennsylvania and New York, the beneficiaries of the cleanup in Maryland (including the C4) and Virginia, the Federal Government (good luck taking money from the 1-percenters in the current political climate!), or a corporation whose main environmental crimes seems to be having deep pockets and tone-deaf ears to public sentiment?

The Boogeyman that we really need to address is the reduction of pollution from Pennsylvania and New York. That should be addressed and funded by those states (while we continue to do our share). Perhaps dredging is a viable solution. Perhaps Exelon should be a better corporate citizen. But I do not see where we, the public, should depend upon the largesse of private corporations to take care of what are public problems.

Likewise, I object to my county tax dollars being spent tilting at windmills, especially when CCC can’t even pick the right windmill. Furthermore, I object to my county tax dollars supporting what I consider quasi-extortion in squeezing funding from Exelon through threats from the State of Maryland by Governor Hogan and MDE Secretary Grumbles, aided and abetted by the CCC. And to my everlasting dismay, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, an organization which I greatly admire, seems quite willing to trade its scientific integrity for a handful of silver.

Well, I guess $172 million a year to the Bay cleanup is quite a few handfuls; at least we know their integrity doesn’t come cheap). Of course, the 35,000 Pennsylvania farms in the Susquehanna basin could contribute about $4,900 each, or each resident of the basin could kick in a paltry $38 to raise the same amount. But it is much more politically expedient to deflect the blame to a corporation.

I can almost see the movie scene in my head. An Exelon executive is waking up one morning and finds a bloodied and beheaded American shad in his bed, along with a note saying: “Nice hydropower license you have there. It would be a shame if something happened to it.”

Come to think of it, if the penalty imposed on Exelon for not cleaning up the problems caused by the polluters in Pennsylvania and New York is $172,000,000 per year, perhaps Exelon should consider sending a bill to Maryland and Virginia (maybe Pennsylvania and New York, too) for reimbursement for its gratis efforts over the past 80 years. Fourteen billion dollars would be a tidy sum that could be “donated” to Bay cleanup efforts.

William Herb has B.S. (Forestry) and M.S. degrees (Forest Hydrology) from the Pennsylvania State University and did additional graduate school studies in the Environmental Engineering program at Johns Hopkins. He was a hydrologist for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in College Park and Towson, Maryland, where he specialized in sediment studies, including sediment trap efficiency and sediment production in urbanizing areas. He relocated with the USGS to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and worked on projects characterizing the hydrology and water chemistry in bituminous coal mining areas and statistical hydrology.  He moved on to Texas and supervised a team of about a dozen hydrologists and technicians in extensive hydrologic data-collection programs.

Bill then returned to Maryland as the USGS liaison to the Army Environmental Command (AEC) at Aberdeen Proving Ground.  He managed several divisions within the AEC, and also served as the Chief of the Army’s Northern Regional Environmental Office and the Department of Defense Regional Environmental Coordinator for Federal Region V.  After retirement from the USGS, he joined Booz Allen Hamilton and supported AEC and the Installation Management Command (IMCOM) in managing the testing of Army environmental software and took a lead role in hiring computer scientists and related staff for the newly formed Information Management Division of IMCOM.

 

ShoreRivers Hosts 14th Annual Ride for Clean Rivers

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On Sunday, September 16, ShoreRivers will host the 14th Annual Ride for Clean Rivers. Ride the beautiful back roads of Talbot and Queen Anne’s Counties in support of ShoreRivers’ work for clean water. This is a great way to bring summer to a close surrounded by friends, family, and fellow community members. Register at rideforcleanrivers.org before September 8 to receive discounted pricing and guarantee an event tee-shirt!

Cyclers of all ages and levels are welcome to register for 20-mile, 35-mile, or 63-mile (metric century) routes. All routes begin and end at Chesapeake College, and include SAG support and rest stops with food and drink. The metric ride will kickoff at 8:00 am and the 35-mile and 20-mile rides will follow at 10:00 am.Upon returning to the college campus, riders and volunteers will enjoy a BBQ lunch and live music by Fog After Midnight. For the first time, every rider will be entered into a raffle to win a Garmin Edge 1030 cycling computer. A second cycling computer will be awarded to the team that raises the most money.

Cyclist prepare to leave at the Ride for Clean Rivers start line.

ShoreRivers looks forward to continued support from the community for this year’s event. Whether enjoying a Sunday bike ride, riding with friends, or promoting a business, this event is about coming together. It is not too late to create a team or sign up to join ShoreRivers in support of cleaner, healthier rivers.

Thank you to event sponsors Dock Street Foundation, KELLY Benefit Strategies, Agency of Record, Bay Imprint, Bay Pediatric Center, Bike Doctor, Blessings Environmental Concepts, The Brewer’s Art, Chesapeake 4-H Club, Chesapeake College, Dr. Computer, Easton Family YMCA, Ecotone Ecological Restoration, S.E.W. Friel, Resource Restoration Group, Sprout, and Shore Orthopedics.

All proceeds go toward ShoreRivers’ ongoing education, restoration, and water quality monitoring programs. For more information, please phone 443.385.0511 or contact KristanDroter at kdroter@shorerivers.org or Julia Erbe at jerbe@shorerivers.org.

ShoreRivers will also host the Chester River Challenge in Chestertown during Downrigging Weekend. Participants may walk or run a 5K or run a half marathon to support ShoreRivers. The event will be held on Sunday, October 28, 2018 from 9am-12pm at Wilmer Park in Chestertown, MD. Register online at TriSportsEvents.com or on the day of the race.

5K Run/Walk: $20 before October 21: $25 after
Half Marathon: $50 before October 21; $60 after

ShoreRivers protects and restores Eastern Shore waterways through science-based advocacy, restoration, and education. We work collaboratively with our community yet maintain an uncompromising and independent voice for clean rivers and the living resources they support.

shorerivers.org