The Annual Cherry Tree Young Writers’ Conference July 18 and 19

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The Cherry Tree Young Writers’ Conference, which invites high school students to Washington College to work with esteemed writers, will feature readings on July 18 and 19 highlighting the conference’s faculty. On July 18, James Allen Hall, conference director and director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House, will join poet Jehanne Dubrow in a reading, while H.G. Carrillo and Julie Marie Wade will read on July 19. Both events, held at the Lit House, begin at 7 p.m. and are free and open to the public.

Jehanne Dubrow was born in Italy and grew up in Yugoslavia, Zaire, Poland, Belgium, Austria, and the United States. She is the author of six poetry collections, including most recently Dots & Dashes (Southern Illinois University Press, 2017), winner of the Crab Orchard Series Open Competition Award, The Arranged Marriage (University of New Mexico Press, 2015), Red Army Red (Northwestern University Press, 2012), and Stateside (Northwestern University Press, 2010). She is a co-editor of the anthologies The Book of Scented Things: 100 Contemporary Poems about Perfume and Still Life with Poem: Contemporary Natures Mortes in Verse (Literary House Press, 2014 and 2016). Her poems, essays, and book reviews have appeared in The Southern ReviewNew England ReviewThe Hudson ReviewPleiades, and Virginia Quarterly Review. She is an associate professor of creative writing at the University of North Texas.

Top: Jehanne Dubrow and James Allen Hall; Bottom: H.G. Carrillo and Julie Marie Wade

James Allen Hall is an associate professor of English at Washington College, where he also serves as director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House. His book of lyric personal essays, I Liked You Better Before I Knew You So Well, won Cleveland State University Poetry Center’s Essay Collection Award. Also a poet, Hall is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation of the Arts, the University of Arizona Poetry Center, and others. His first book of poems, Now You’re the Enemy (University of Arkansas Press, 2008), won awards from the Lambda Literary Foundation, the Texas Institute of Letters, and the Fellowship of Southern Writers. His work has appeared in Best American Poetry 2012A Public SpaceThe American Poetry ReviewBoston ReviewNew England ReviewStory QuarterlyBennington Review, and in other national literary magazines and journals.

H.G. Carrillo is the author of Loosing My Espanish, a novel. His short stories have appeared in Kenyon ReviewConjunctionsThe Iowa ReviewGlimmer TrainNinth LetterSlice and other journals and publications. He is the 2018 Writer in Residence for The Kratz Center for Creative Writing at Goucher College, and sits on the executive board of directors of the PEN/Faulkner Foundation.

Julie Marie Wade is the author of ten collections of poetry and prose, including Wishbone: A Memoir in Fractures, Small Fires, When I Was Straight, Catechism: A Love Story, and SIX. Her newest collections are Same-Sexy Marriage: Poems (A Midsummer Night’s Press, 2018) and The Unrhymables: Collaborations in Prose (Wild Patience Books, 2018), co-authored with Denise Duhamel. Wade teaches in the creative writing program at Florida International University and reviews regularly for Lambda Literary Review and The Rumpus. She is married to Angie Griffin and lives on Hollywood Beach.

For more information on this and other events, view our annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/7406-2017-2018. The 2018-19 brochure is forthcoming this summer. For more information on the Literary House, visit www.washcoll.edu/centers/lithouse/.

For more information on the Cherry Tree Young Writers’ Conference, visit www.washcoll.edu/centers/lithouse/programs/the-cherry-tree-young-writers-conference/.

Major Kerr Fund Grant Supports WRUS MakerSpace

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WRUS students collaborated with local artist Sue Stockman to create a permanent mosaic.

An innovative MakerSpace project at Centreville’s Wye River Upper School (WRUS), has been greatly strengthened by a $120,000 grant from the Grayce B. Kerr Fund, Inc. of Easton, Maryland. This new grant to the independent school for bright students who learn differently will augment a recent $100,000 grant for the capital portion of the MakerSpace project from Baltimore’s Middendorf Foundation by helping to support faculty who will lead the project over the next three years.

The WRUS Board of Trustees is pleased to announce this grant to the student-centered “design and build” educational experience set to launch in the 2018-19 school year.

The Grayce B Kerr Fund’s president, John Valliant said, “The Trustees of the Grayce B. Kerr Fund, Inc. are pleased to assist Wye River Upper School in this exciting addition to their dynamic curriculum. Innovative programs like this are what keeps WRUS as a leader in providing a quality education experience to those with learning differences.”

WRUS Board Chair Alexa Seip commented, “The Grayce B. Kerr Fund is a remarkable asset for the Mid-Shore community and beyond. At WRUS, the Kerr Fund has enabled many deserving students to experience transforming opportunities as they prepare to take their place as contributing citizens in the future.  We at WRUS are most grateful for this generous support from the Kerr Fund.”

The WRUS MakerSpace at 318 S. Commerce Street in Centreville, MD will be located adjacent to the school’s main structure, a historically renovated former Maryland National Guard Armory. With funding from the Middendorf Foundation, work is underway to prepare the structure to accommodate the equipment and tools needed for a MakerSpace.

WRUS Executive Director Chrissy Aull explains, “A MakerSpace is similar to what we used to call  ‘shop’, with some big differences. It is a gender-neutral space equipped with low tech and high tech “design and build” equipment and tools where students, instead of being told what to build, are encouraged to collaborate in identifying issues or needs, creating possible designs to address the need, and then fabricating the object. We will have 3D printers and laser cutters as well as more low-tech hand and power tools, and will weave design opportunities throughout the entire curriculum. We see this MakerSpace as an engaging way to prepare our students for the demands of college and careers.”

WRUS students, staff and visiting artist Sue Stockman designed and constructed a mosaic mural.

Art and Technology Instructor James Martinez, a WRUS teacher since the school’s founding, will lead the design and use of the Space.  Martinez brings broad experience to the project while helping WRUS students create a 3D Printer for the new space.  A graduate of Texas Tech University with an MFA in printmaking from the University of Delaware, he has taught at the Delaware College of Art & Design and Washington College and is a frequent participant in MakerFaires in Brooklyn, N.Y. “Projects can be simple or much more complex; the focus is on encouraging students to identify, design and build,” advises Martinez.

Wye River Upper School was founded in 2002 and leased space on the campus of Chesapeake College until 2014 when it relocated to its permanent campus in the repurposed Centreville Armory.  An independent high school educating bright high school students with learning differences including dyslexia, ADHD, autism and anxiety, WRUS is accredited by the Association of Independent Maryland Schools (AIMS) and certified by the Maryland State Department of Education.

For more information about the School contact Katie Theeke at 410-758-2922 or katietheeke@wyeriverupperschool.org

The High & Wides at the Riverfront Concert Series July 26

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Back by popular demand,the legendary High & Wides rock the stage at the Riverfront Concert series on Thursday, July 26.  Hosted by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience at Washington College, the final 2018 riverfront concert is free and open to the public. The program begins at 6:30 p.m. on the lawn of the Custom House at 101 S. Water Street, Chestertown.

We invite you to bring friends and family (all ages are welcome), a picnic, and your own chairs or blanket. Or just relax on the grass and partake of free lemonade and cookies. Either way, come and enjoy the energetic sounds of this innovative band recently described by the Washington Post as “apostles of hillbilly boogie.”

The High & Wides, like the large-haul trains for which the band is named, project a big, driving sound—mountain musical traditions re-imagined for a new century. Formed on Maryland’s Eastern Shore in 2015, the band makes music about arson and hourly motels, dystopian love songs, and ballads of violent history. The High & Wides draw from members’ extensive backgrounds in bluegrass and take the music to a place all their own, recalling an era when old-time, rockabilly, and proto-rock’n’roll coexisted in a murky soup of hillbilly string band music. The High & Wides include Marc Dykeman (guitar and vocals), Sam Guthridge (banjo, mandolin and vocals), Nate Grower (fiddle), and Mike Buccino (upright bass). Their new album, titled Lifted, was released this spring to popular acclaim.

The Starr Center’s riverfront concerts — a summer tradition for the past eight years — present American music in all its breadth and diversity, with performers in a variety of genres from across the region and beyond. As part of each event, Starr Center program manager Michael Buckley, who is also a longtime radio host on WRNR-FM, leads a Q&A with the visiting artists.

For more information, visit starrcenter.washcoll.edu or contact Michael Buckley, mbuckley3@washcoll.edu, 410-810-7156. In case of rain, the concert will take place in Hynson Pavilion, Wilmer Park.  Special support for the summer concert series is provided by Yerkes Construction and Washington College Student Events Board.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Gunston Announces Fourth Quarter Academic Honors

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Congratulations to the following students for earning High Honors or Honors for the fourth quarter of the 2017-2018 academic year. To earn a place on the High Honors list, a student must have an A average and effort grades of “S” or above. To earn Honors, a student must achieve a B+/A- average and effort grades of “S” or above.

High Honors

Grade 12

Rongjie (Rose) Fan, Steven Goss, Lila Ingersoll, Sam Johnson, Mary Macmillan, Alex Papadopoulos, Henry Parkhurst, Ryleigh Paskoski, Neel Patel, Alli Webb

Grade 11

Kejing (Karen) Chen, Cole Evans, Phin Howell, Claire Johnson, Paige Murphy, James Pratt, Megan Prochaska, Caroline Roser, Katie Schiwy, Haorui (Davy) Song, Nellie Stup, Fuji (Cynthia) Yang, Sitong (Vicky) Zhou

Grade 10

Andrew Amygdalos, Eily Ashley, Yuntian (Areopl) Bai, Cotter Buckley, Nina De Angelo, Frankie Fisher, Emily Gray, Wyatt Howell, Lily Judd, Katie Moreau, Will Newberg, Erica Reece, Isabella Santoboni, Max Scott, Qirui (Allen) Wang

Grade 9

Avy Aubin, Lily Berntsen, Helen Boone, Em Borghardt, Julie Ireland, Rion McCluskey, Sydney Nittle, Ethan Nuessle, Campbell Parkhurst, Lydia Periconi, Sean Riley, Charlie Shifrin, Haoying (Grace) Wang, Hannah Worth

Honors

Grade 12

Simon Cawley, Simiao (Grace) Dai, Tirza Enriquez, Gillian Felton, Susie Fordi, Jack Morrison, Hope Murphy, Chris Newberg, Dutch Nickerson, Lily Phipps, Joey Smith, Tanner Ways

Grade 11

Dolan Carella, Anneliese Clair, Shiloh Clark, Becky DeFino, Katie Easter, Will Gibson, Menel Harris, Yanni Harris, Griffin Hecht, Leah Hellwege, Grafton Howard, Camy Kelly, Nick Lee, Miao (Suzy) Li, Michell Pagan, Marisa Pisapia, Drew Seaman, Yifan (Michael)Shen, Elena Sherman, Morgan Smith, Katie Staley, Anna Wolf, Yong (George) Yan

Grade 10

MacCallum Borghardt, Mark Bourdin, Stephen Brown, Natalie Cockey, Kate Dieterle, Cedar Foster, Lynsey Hildebrand, Grace Holmes, Nick Kellogg, Junlin (Thompson) Leng, Mason Rudolfs, Peter Sharpless, Owen White

Grade 9

Bella Adams, Zack Anderson, Max Brady, Arianna Campi, Lydia Davis, Kayla Flood, James Fordi, Glynis Gardner, Reagan Gessford, Emma McClary, Aiden Myers, Adie Parish, Connor Reichardt, Joshua Sanford, Owen Santora, Severin Schut, Henry Shifrin, Christian Walker, Colin Ward, Lilli Ward

Riverfront Concert Series Features Ultrafaux with Danny Knicely July 12

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The Baltimore-based musical sensation Ultrafaux, with special guest Danny Knicely, takes the stage at the Riverfront Concert series on Thursday, July 12.  Hosted by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience at Washington College, the concert is free and open to the public. The program begins at 6:30 p.m.

We invite you to bring friends and family (all ages are welcome), a picnic, and your own chairs or blanket. Or just relax on the lawn of the Custom House (101 S. Water Street, Chestertown) and partake of free lemonade and cookies. Either way, come and enjoy an eclectic mix of bebop, funk, and gypsy folk.

The Starr Center’s riverfront concerts — a summer tradition for the past eight years — present American music in all its breadth and diversity, with performers in a variety of genres from across the region and beyond. As part of each event, Starr Center program manager Michael Buckley, who is also a longtime radio host on WRNR-FM, leads a Q&A with the visiting artists.

Ultrafaux is an acoustic powerhouse of two guitars and upright bass that has thrilled audiences at festivals and concert halls worldwide since the release of its first CD in 2014. The group performs original music inspired by Django Reinhardt, jazz manouche, gypsy folk, swing, funk, blues, and French musette. Lead guitarists Michael Joseph Harris and Sami Arefin trade dazzling leads and harmonize together on rich melodies. A composer and the founding guitarist of Ultrafaux and Hot Club of Baltimore, Harris was named one of the top ten local artists by Baltimore Style magazine.

At this year’s Riverfront Concert Series, Ultrafaux welcomes master mandolinist Danny Knicely. Coming from a family steeped in a bluegrass and mountain music tradition, Knicely has performed on four continents, including U.S. State Department tours in Tunisia, Morocco, and Russia.

Special support for the summer concert series is provided by Yerkes Construction and Washington College Student Events Board. The final event in this year’s Riverfront Concert Series lineup, featuring the popular bluegrass group the High &Wides, will take place Thursday, July 26.

For more information, visit starrcenter.washcoll.edu or contact Michael Buckley, mbuckley3@washcoll.edu, 410-810-7156. In case of rain, the concert will take place in Hynson Pavilion, Wilmer Park.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Wye River Upper School Graduates Offer Strong Testimonies

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“Embrace Discomfort. When I find myself in a challenging situation I often remind myself that nothing ever gets accomplished when I am comfortable with where I am.  If you want to succeed at something you must be willing to fail at it too.”  Nevin Hamami, WRUS Class of 2018

This was the advice that Wye River Upper School (WRUS) senior Nevin Hamami shared with his eleven classmates, family and friends during an evening Commencement on May 22, 2018.  Hamami and two classmates, Olivia Bailey of Dorchester County and Alex Kliever of Kent County chose to speak during the Commencement, a tradition begun by the school in 2004.

Another tradition of the school is for graduates to leave their seats and move into the audience to present individual white roses to their immediate family, as a gesture of appreciation for their years of support. It is an exchange marked by hugs and tears of joy.

But this year, it was the senior speakers who stole the show. Boxes of tissue were being passed around and each of the three received a standing ovation.

Hamami resides in Arnold, Md.  He plans to return to the Eastern Shore in the fall to attend Chesapeake College.  An accomplished soccer athlete, Hamami will join his good friend and WRUS Alumnus Matt Donohue ‘17 to play for the Chesapeake soccer team.

Olivia Bailey moved her audience to tears with a heartfelt look back as a WRUS student.  Bailey pointed to her opportunity to be cast in several theatre productions and learn to play the violin.  “Wye River gave me a place where I could be myself. This school helped me find who I am, and gave me hope for my future.” Bailey will attend St. Mary’s College in the fall, where she will pursue her love of theatre.

Alex Kliever reflected upon his experience earning his Eagle Scout status with the Boy Scouts of America and advised his classmates “…not to give up and to see your commitments through to the very end. I understand now that it takes integrity… to follow through on what you set out to accomplish.” Kliever has a detailed plan to attend Chesapeake College for two years and transfer to a four – year degree program in pursuit of engineering coursework.

WRUS Chair of the Board, Alexa Seip joined the twelve graduates, Head of School Chrissy Aull and Commencement Speaker, Parker Seip on the school’s small stage. “I speak for the Board of Trustees that to hear heartfelt speeches such as I heard this evening captures the reason why we as volunteers work diligently to make WRUS an option for the community.  All kids should learn and grow the way these twelve have.”

Parker Seip of Charlotte, NC, addressed the Class of 2018 with an emphasis that their Commencement marked the beginning of their adult lives as “smart people in pursuit of their passions”.  His advice to follow their passion was highlighted through his own experience as a learning-differenced high school student at the Winston School in California, where he successfully combined academics with his love of aviation.  As a teenager, Seip earned a pilot’s license and was soon instructing others to fly.  Seip is employed as a First Officer on a commercial AirBus with a major airline.

Seniors earned most of the school’s major awards, all of which are presented at Commencement.  The Thomas West Digital Arts and Technology Award, named after Centreville native and author Thomas West, was presented by West to senior Will Hazzard.  Hazzard will attend Salisbury University in the spring of 2019.  The Stuart M. Bounds Dual Enrollment Award recipient is Grasonville resident Sarah Franklin, who will attend Chesapeake College in the fall. The WRUS Portfolio Award was presented to Hamami for his outstanding work in digitally capturing his best academic work through four years and presenting same.  Bailey and Franklin shared the Conner E. Bell Perseverance Award.  Named after WRUS Alumni Conner Bell, this award is a college scholarship, funded by his family, to recognize Conner’s perseverance and success despite diagnosed neurological conditions.

The 2018 graduates will pursue a wide range of interests and studies following high school.  One hundred percent of the class was accepted to college, ten will attend, one has begun a small business, and another is arranging an internship and course of study in equine science and care. “This class exemplifies the mission and philosophy of Wye River Upper School,” says Head of School Aull. “We work to ready each student for college and career, give them guidance and support in their post high school choices and are proud of each graduate as they follow their interests and passions.”

Wye River Upper School is an independent, college and career preparatory high school located in Centreville, MD.  The school’s mission is to educate bright high school students with learning differences, bound for college and career. For more information regarding the school, please contact Katie Theeke at 410-758-2922.

Gunston Students Excel in National Foreign Language Exams

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Congratulations to students from The Gunston School who attained national recognition for excellent performance on the 2018 National Spanish and Latin Examinations earning a total of 7 gold, 10 silver and 13 bronze medals along with 20 honorable mentions.

Latin Exams:

Gold medalist at level 1: Helen Boone

Silver medalist at level 3: James Pratt

Silver medalist at level 2: Sam Umidi

Silver medalist at level 1: Sean Riley

Honorable mention at level 2: Zack Anderson, Isabella Santoboni

Honorable mention at level 1: Hannah Worth

Latin Awards: Left to right, Mr. Angarita, Sean Riley, Sam Umidi, James Pratt, Helen Boone, Ms. Wheatley

Spanish Exams:

Gold medalists at level 5: Henry Parkhurst

Gold medalists at level 2: Avy Aubin, Andrew Amygdalos, Haroui Song

Gold medalist at level 1: Ryan Evans, Charles Shifrin

Silver medalists at level 3: Lila Ingersoll

Silver medalists at level 2: Payton Lord, Lydia Periconi

Silver medalists at level 1: Cedar Foster, Grace Holmes, Orion McCluskey, Henry Shifrin

Bronze medalists at level 3: Michelle Pagan, Marisa Pisapia, Caroline Roser

Bronze medalists at level 2: Shiloh Clark, Annabelle Gillespie, Ellie Merton, Campbell Parkhurst

Bronze medalists at level 1: Mark Bourdin, Will Gibson, Lynsey Hildebrand, Cameryn Kelly, Lillian Ward, Owen White

Honorable mention at level 3: Heidi Barcus, Hopewell Murphy, Paige Murphy, Elena Sherman

Honorable mention at level 2: Rick Archambault, Eileen Ashley, Rose Fan, Griffin Hecht, Claire Johnson, Sydney Nittle, Joey Smith

Honorable mention at level 1: Hannah Beckman, Emerson Borghardt, Stephen Brown, Kayla Flood, Glynis Gardner, Reagan Gessford, Leah Hellwege, Nicholas Kellogg, Colin Ward

Students were taught by Spanish teachers, Juan Angarita and Avis Wheatley, and Latin teacher, Erin Ferguson.

The National Language Examinations are administered each year across the country in grades 6 through 12, and are sponsored by the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese and the American Classical League and the National Junior Classical League.

St. Anne’s Episcopal School Chosen to Model New Singapore Math Materials

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St. Anne’s Episcopal School has been selected as one of three schools in the United States to serve as a Model School for the newly published Singapore Math textbook, “think!Mathematics.”   Upon completion of the program next year, St. Anne’s will become certified as a “Model School” in implementing effective mathematics instruction and will have the ability to hold training sessions on campus supported by international experts in Singapore Math as well as host potential lesson studies for visiting teachers.

St. Anne’s Episcopal School First Grade Teachers Tara Liguori and Melissa Meier.

Our students are thinking about math differently,” said Valerie White, Director of Curriculum and Instruction. “The changes we have made to our teaching methods through the implementation of Singapore Math have also had a positive impact on our teaching in other subject areas.  We know that in order to maximize learning, students need to be able to think flexibly and communicate their reasoning in multiple ways.  The excitement and enthusiasm for learning has been palpable.”

St. Anne’s introduced the Singapore Math approach to teaching mathematics in September 2016 in Kindergarten through Second Grade with help in part from a Longwood Foundation grant.   This past school year, First Grade Teachers Tara Liguori and Melissa Meier were two of just 12 teachers participating in a project to pilot the “think!Mathematics” textbook and workbook for the U.S. market with Sarah Schaefer and Dr. Yeap Ban Har, two of the foremost Singapore Math thinkers in the world.

“I asked Tara and Melissa to be a part of our study because they have embraced the whole methodology & pedagogy of Singapore Math from the very beginning,” Sarah Schaefer said.   “They are excited about what they are doing.  They want to get better.  Anything that will make them better, or their students better, they will do.  They are truly invested in that.”

Third graders Sania Baig and Maliya Dover.

The introduction of these new Singapore Math materials will occur in First through Fifth Grade over two years.  St. Anne’s will also pilot a new Singapore Math text in Kindergarten next year which was co-authored by Sarah Schaefer.

“Singapore Math is about learning a different way of thinking about math,” Melissa Meier said, “It required a big shift.”  Tara Liguori added “You have to be flexible in your thinking in order to evolve, and that can be challenging.  This is something our school does well, we take a growth mindset.”

Located in Middletown, DE, St. Anne’s Episcopal School (www.stannesde.org) is a Preschool (age 3) through Grade 8 co-ed independent day school that focuses on academic excellence and spiritual growth in a small, family-oriented and diverse community. Founded by visionary educators from St. Andrew’s School in 2002, the school’s academic program prepares students for honors course work in the finest area high schools through its commitment to intellectual, spiritual, physical, social, and artistic growth and character development.

Gunston Receives Edward E. Ford Grant

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The Gunston School is pleased to announce that it’s innovative new program, The Chesapeake Watershed Semester, is the recipient of a grant from the Edward E. Ford Foundation. This award of $100,000, matched 1:1 by funds raised, will provide $200,000 in seed money to launch this ground-breaking program that offers aspiring student leaders an educational experience with a joint focus on environmental science and public policy.

The Chesapeake Watershed Semester (CWS) is a semester-length opportunity for highly motivated juniors or seniors to immerse themselves in the study and restoration of the Chesapeake Bay. Through dynamic and diverse field-study expeditions, students will travel the region meeting with stakeholders and conducting research. Rigorous classroom, laboratory, and research project work will deepen each student’s academic foundation, leading to a capstone action project to be formally presented at the end of the program. We expect that each cohort of CWS students will emerge as reflective and confident scholars and leaders who can support regional and global environmental sustainability through their understanding of scientific, social, cultural, and political systems.

In a highly competitive grant cycle, The Gunston School is pleased to be one of 13 schools receiving awards from the Foundation. “The Gunston School is grateful for the ongoing support from the Edward E. Ford Foundation,” said John Lewis, “the rigorous, multi-stage application process allowed us to reflect on the school’s growth and success over the past eight years. Such work would not have been possible without the support of our Board of Trustees, families, and staff at the school. The EE Ford Foundation is the preeminent foundation for supporting innovations in high school education making their recognition of our new program particularly impactful.” In a letter to Gunston’s Head of School, John Lewis, announcing the grant award, John C. Gulla, Executive Director of The Edward E. Ford Foundation, said, “…it is a very important and exciting program and I look forward to hearing about it in the years to come.”

The grant from the EE Ford Foundation will help to support the program’s successful launch in the pilot years, and help The Gunston School and CWS build a “bridge” between the pilot program and the fully residential CWS program, which aims to enroll students from across the country and around the globe.

Emily Beck, Director of the Chesapeake Watershed Semester, credits the extensive partnership network around CWS for drawing the attention of the EE Ford Foundation. “Our formal partnerships with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Washington College’s Center for Environment and Society, Sultana Education Foundation, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, and the Echo Hill Outdoor School are pivotal to our goals of crafting a program imbued with academic rigor and immersive field experiences for our students” Beck said. “We have designed the program to meet the educational challenges of our time and are eager to begin our first semester in a few short months.”

The Gunston School and the Chesapeake Watershed Semester will raise a matching $100,000 as part of the grant requirements. The cumulative sum will be the rocket fuel that helps to launch the nascent program. The pilot semester, fully enrolled with 13 students, will launch in August of 2018. Students interested in the program can learn more at chesapeakewatershedsemester.org and consider applying for the Fall 2019 cohort. Follow along the adventures of the CWS1 on Facebook and Instagram throughout the fall of 2018.

About the Gunston School

The Gunston School offers an intellectually rigorous, highly personalized, and nurturing college preparatory educational experience. Valuing a healthy balance between mind and body, a strong sense of community, the creative process, and our connection to the Chesapeake Bay, Gunston strives to educate ethically and environmentally minded scholars, citizens, and leaders for our globalized society. The Gunston School, located on the banks of the Corsica River in Centreville, MD, serves 200 students in grades 9-12.

About the Edward E. Ford Foundation

The Edward E. Ford Foundation supports and strengthens independent secondary schools with its mission to “challenge and inspire them to leverage their unique talents, expertise and resources to advance teaching and learning throughout this country by supporting and disseminating best practice, by supporting efforts to develop and implement models of sustainability, and by encouraging collaboration with other institutions.”