David Blight to Speak at Washington College on February 7

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Eminent Yale historian David W. Blight’s new book Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom is the first full biography in decades of the most famous African American of the 19th century. Born into slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Frederick Douglass escaped north, and went on to become a celebrated orator, leading abolitionist, brilliant statesman and one of the most significant writers in American history. As Blight demonstrates, throughout his long life Douglass never stopped ferociously fighting with his “voice, pen, and vote” for civil and political rights.

Blight will speak at Washington College on Thursday, February 7. The event, which is free and open to the public, begins at 5:30 p.m. in Decker Theatre, Gibson Center for the Arts. Books will be for sale, and a book signing will follow the talk. The program is sponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the Department of History, and the American Studies Program.

A New York TimesWall Street Journal, and Time top 10 book of the year, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom captures the complexity of Douglass’s public and personal life with detail and insight. In a recent Washington Post review, Starr Center Director Adam Goodheart wrote that the book “is not just a deeply researched birth-to-death chronology but also an extended meditation on what it means to be a prophet. … In Blight’s pages, [Douglass’s] voice again rings out loud and clear, melancholy and triumphant — still prophesying, still agitating, still calling us to action.”

The author of several other acclaimed works on slavery, race and the Civil War era, David W. Blight is Class of 1954 Professor of American History and Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University.  His books include American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era; and Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, which won the Bancroft Prize, the Abraham Lincoln Prize, and the Frederick Douglass Prize, among other awards. Last February, Blight received Washington College’s Award for Excellence in recognition of his scholarly work and his work in the world of public history in furthering research and conversation on slavery and its legacy.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations.With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Communications and Media Studies Speaker Series Feb. 4 and Mar. 25

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Washington College’s Communication and Media Studies (CMS) Speaker Series resumes this semester with Allison Page, Assistant Professor of Communication and Theatre Arts at Old Dominion University, and Stephanie Brown, visiting Assistant Professor of Communication at St. Louis University, speaking on the issues of race and gender, respectively.

Page’s talk, “ ‘Meet, Help, Become a Slave…to Better Understand History’: Race and Agency in Educational Videogames” is set for Feb. 4, and Brown’s presentation “Open Mic?: Gender, Labor, and Gatekeeping in Stand-up Comedy,” will be March 25. Both events, held at Litrenta Lecture Hall in the Toll Science Center, are free and open to the public. Page’s talk begins at 4:30 p.m. and Brown’s begins at 5:30.

Page, who holds a joint appointment in Old Dominion’s Humanities Institute, focuses on critical cultural studies of race and mediated technologies. Her presentation will examine the educational role-playing videogame Flight to Freedom, part of the Mission U.S. series of games designed to teach middle school students about the history of slavery in the United States. Through an analysis of the game as well as the broader educational agenda and policy discourse in which Flight to Freedom is situated, Page argues that the game is a technology of racialized citizenship, part of a longer legacy of public media works that govern race.

Allison Page and Stephanie Brown

Brown, whose research looks at the intersections of gender, comedy, and popular culture, will discuss how stand-up comedy tends to produce and exacerbate gendered and racial inequality, especially at the local, least formalized levels. Like other cultural industries, stand-up is marked by short-term precarious employment, informal networks of entry, and a lack of managerial structure or formal policies on diversity and inclusion. Brown’s presentation will also touch on the ways in which women, especially queer women and women of color, are treated within the stand-up industry—locally, nationally, and in digital spaces—as outsiders who must constantly prove their worth through a shifting and slippery set of aesthetic and cultural norms that reinforce masculine dominance both on and offstage.

The CMS Speaker Series is dedicated to advancing discourse and learning around contemporary issues in communication and media studies across disciplines.For more information on the CMS program, please visit https://www.washcoll.edu/departments/communication-and-media-studies/ or contact Prof. Alicia Kozma at akozma2@washcoll.edu

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations.With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Nationally Renowned Fiction Writers Coming to Rose O’ Neill Literary House

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The Washington College Department of English and Rose O’ Neill Literary House are teaming up this spring to bring four of the country’s most compelling fiction writers to the College and the Chestertown community as part of the Literary House & Sophie Kerr Reading Series.

Starting on Feb. 5, the semester features readings by acclaimed authors Lucy Corin, Edward P. Jones, Lidia Yuknavitch, and Rion Amilcar Scott. All readings, which are free and open to the public, will be held at the Lit House and begin at 4:30 p.m.

Feb. 5Lucy Corin. Corin is the author of the short story collections One Hundred Apocalypses and Other Apocalypses (McSweeney’s Books, 2013) and The Entire Predicament (Tin House Books, 2007), as well as the novel Everyday Psychokillers: A History for Girls (FC2, 2004). Her writing has appeared in American Short FictionConjunctionsHarper’s MagazinePloughsharesTin House, and the New American Stories anthology (Vintage Contemporaries, 2015). She was an American Academy of Arts and Letters Rome Prize winner and an NEA fellow in literature in 2016. Currently at work on a novel, The Swank Hotel, Corin has a BA from Duke University and an MFA from Brown University. A professor at the University of California, Davis, Corin teaches in the English department and creative writing program.

February 28Edward P. Jones. Jones is the author of two collections of short stories: Lost in the City (Amistad Press, 1992), winner of the Ernest Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award and the Lannan Literary Award for Fiction, and All Aunt Hagar’s Children (Amistad Press, 2006). Jones’s novel The Known World (Amistad Press, 2003) won the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the Lannan Literary Award, and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. In addition to winning the PEN/Malamud Award in 2010, Jones has received fellowships from the MacArthur Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Jones currently teaches fiction writing at George Washington University and lives in Washington, D.C.

Top – Lucy Corin, Edward P. Jones. Bottom – Lidia Yuknavitch, Rion Amilcar Scott

On March 19Lidia Yuknavitch. Yuknavitch is the author of national bestselling novels The Book of Joan (Harper, 2017) and The Small Backs of Children (Harper, 2015), winner of the 2016 Oregon Book Award’s Ken Kesey Award for Fiction as well as the Reader’s Choice Award, the novel Dora: A Headcase (Hawthorne Books, 2012), and a critical book on war and narrative, Allegories Of Violence (Routledge, 2000). Her widely acclaimed memoir The Chronology of Water (Hawthorne Books, 2011) was a finalist for a PEN Center USA award for creative nonfiction and winner of a PNBA Award and the Oregon Book Award Reader’s Choice. A book based on her recent TED Talk, The Misfit’s Manifesto (Simon & Schuster/TED Books), was released in October 2017. Her writing has also appeared in Guernica MagazineMs.The Iowa ReviewZyzzyvaAnother Chicago MagazineThe Sun,Exquisite CorpseTANK, and in the anthologies Life As We Show It: Writing on Film (City Lights Publishers, 2009), Wreckage of Reason: XXperimental Prose by Contemporary Women Writers (Spuyten Duyvil, 2008), Forms at War (FC2, 2009), Feminaissance (Les Figues Press, 2010), and RePresenting Bisexualities: Subjects and Cultures of Fluid Desire (SUNY, 1996), as well as online at The Rumpus. She founded the workshop series Corporeal Writing in Portland, Oregon, where she teaches both in person and online. She received her doctorate in Literature from the University of Oregon.

On April 11Rion Amilcar Scott. Scott’s short story collection, Insurrections (University Press of Kentucky, 2016) was awarded the 2017 PEN/Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction and the 2017 Hillsdale Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers. His work has been published in journals such as The Kenyon ReviewCrab Orchard Review, and The Rumpus, among others. The World Doesn’t Require You, his sophomore story collection, is forthcoming from Liveright.

Each event will be followed by a book sale and signing. For more information, see our Literary Events Brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/8293-2018-19-literary-events-brochure, or visit the Literary House website at www.washcoll.edu/centers/lithouse. More information about the Sophie Kerr Department can be found here: www.washcoll.edu/departments/english/sophie-kerr-legacy/

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Industry Need Prompts Marine Tech Training at Chesapeake College

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Chesapeake College is establishing a marine technician lab on the Wye Mills Campus. Pictured here are Anthony Depasquale, Rob Marsh, Cliff Coppersmith, John McNally, and Tom Ellis.

In response to area employer demand, Chesapeake College is launching marine technician training designed to prepare students for careers in the marine service industry.

“With abundant waterways and marine industry heritage, the Eastern Shore needs technicians to support both commercial and recreational boating,” said President Cliff Coppersmith. “We’re committed to meeting the needs of area employers, and pleased that we could respond so quickly to provide marine technician training.”   

Local employers are already behind the training initiative. With a recent $10,000 donation from Rob Marsh of Wye River Marine in Chester, Chesapeake created a Marine Technician Lab and will offer a Yamaha Outboard Motor Certification class this winter.

“Wye River Marine is very excited about our new education partnership with Chesapeake College and Yamaha Outboard,” Marsh said. “The local marine industry is in desperate need of quality trained technicians. This new program will help provide a crucial first step to the area’s marine dealerships’ employment needs.”

Tom Ellis, Chesapeake’s Director of Skilled Trades, has been meeting with area employers to learn about workforce opportunities and training needs. After Marsh urged Chesapeake to develop a marine technician program, the college conducted a survey of local businesses in the marine industry.

“We had overwhelming response. Employers talked about a critical shortage of trained technicians and said they would absolutely hire students if we developed a program,” Ellis said. “The message was clear and things were lining up.  We had an industry need, a market standard curriculum from Yamaha, a generous donor willing to help us get started, and a great instructor ready to teach.”

The next step is enrolling students in the first course. The introductory class, Marine Outboard Engine Systems, begins on Feb. 19.  The two- month class provides a basic understanding of outboard motors and maintenance. No prior experience is required for the course. The course ends with a certification exam.

“The Yamaha Introduction to Outboard Service is designed for the entry-level technician. It will teach the basic skills needed to become a marine technician today. After completing this course and taking

the Yamaha ITOS certification test, students will have a Yamaha Outboard Certification to start their career,” said Anthony Depasquale, District Service Manager for Yamaha Motor Corporation.

John McNally, U.S. Coast Guard Machinery Technician 2nd Class, has 16 years of marine experience and will be the course instructor.

Offered on Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 5- 8 pm on the Wye Mills campus, the class is open to students 16 years and older.  The next section will begin on June 4. Registration is now open for both course sections.

The donation from Wye River Marine funded creation of a Marine Technician Lab in the Manufacturing Training Center. The lab, includes four workstations, each with an outboard motor and full complement of tools.

Ellis said future courses could include advanced engine mechanics, electrical systems, diesel engines, marine HVAC and plumbing, and composites for hull repair.

For more information about the marine service or other skills trades training, please contact tellis@chesapeake.edu.  Learn more at www.chesapeake.edu/marine.

 

 

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About Chesapeake College

Founded in 1965 as Maryland’s first regional community college, Chesapeake serves five Eastern Shore counties – Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot. With more than 130,000 alumnae, Chesapeake has 2,300 students and almost 10,000 people enrolled in continuing education programs.

WC Announces New Partnership with Johns Hopkins University’s MSN

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Washington College students who want to pursue a degree in nursing have a new option thanks to a strategic partnership with Johns Hopkins University’s Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Entry into Nursing Program. With an emphasis on emerging areas of need and health care leadership, the program offers students an accelerated path to a wide array of patient-care careers.

“This Johns Hopkins program is designed for students who have majored in a non-nursing discipline as an undergraduate and decide to pursue nursing after they complete their undergraduate degree,” says Patrice DiQuinzio, Dean and Provost of the College. “Given that this program focuses on leadership and is inclusive of the humanities and public health, it’s a wonderful fit for Washington College and our students.”

The five-semester Entry Into Nursing Program“prepares students to be top patient-care nurses who have unlimited choices after graduation by emphasizing leadership, global impact, quality and safety, evidence-based practice, and inter-professional education,” says Cathy Wilson, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Director of Admissions. Students “will learn from a framework that integrates the humanities, public health, and physical and organizational sciences into nursing practice.” Students graduate with a master of science in nursing and are prepared to take the nursing licensing exam to become an RN, or to continue studies toward an advanced degree.

The new partnership complements Washington College’s current nursing program, which offers a dual-degree option with the University of Maryland School of Nursing, through which students spend three years at WC, then two years at UMD, earning a bachelor’s degree from WC and a BS in nursing from UMD in five years. Students may also complete a traditional four-year bachelor’s degree in a major of their choice while completing their pre-nursing prerequisite courses.

For the Johns Hopkins MSN Entry Into Nursing program, WC students don’t need to major in biology or psychology as they do in the dual-degree bachelor’s program with UMD, but they must have a cumulative GPA of 3.2 and have completed several specific courses with a B or better to be considered for admission. Johns Hopkins will provide the College with an advisor to meet with interested WC students to help them during the admissions process, and scholarships and financial aid are available.

“Not everybody knows they want to get into nursing until later in their undergraduate career,” says Jodi Olson, Director of Pre-Health Professions Programs, who helped shepherd the new partnership. “This program gives those students an excellent post-graduate option.”

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations.With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Horizons of Kent & Queen Anne’s Dance with the Stars 2019

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It is time again for Horizons of Kent & Queen Anne’s Dance With the Stars!  Join us on Saturday, February 2 for one of the most exciting fundraisers in our community, and walk the red carpet for A Night in Hollywood. Local “stars” and pros are paired to earn votes (i.e. dollars!) that raise funds for the Horizons summer enrichment program in Kent & Queen Anne’s counties.  The program offers six weeks of opportunity for underprivileged youth to reduce “summer slide”, enrich their academics, build and grow swimming skills and give the students an overall fun learning environment in the summer.  100% of your donation to this critical program goes directly to helping local children.

As the dancers hone their dance routines, you can vote by contributing $1/vote for the pair (or pairs) of your choice.  A Night in Hollywood is sure to impress, with the Kent County Community Center being transformed into a glitzy Hollywood setting! Grab your friends and buy a table for the night, enjoy delicious food and cocktails, vote for your favorite dancers, and be ready to cut a rug when the dance floor opens up after the show!  If you aren’t able to attend the event, you can donate online at www.horizonskentqueenannes.org or mail donations to Horizons of Kent & Queen Anne’s 116-B Lynchburg Street Chestertown, MD 21620.

Kent School to Offer Saturday School Sneak Peek Sessions for Children

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Kent School is inviting children and their parents to attend a series of fun, Saturday sessions designed to engage and stimulate the curious minds of children ages 9 and under. The workshops will be held on February 2, February 9 and February 23. All session begin at 9:00 a.m. and conclude at 10:30 a.m. except for Gym Time which will end at 11:00 a.m. There is no charge and the public is welcome. For activities designed for children ages five and under parents should plan to stay on campus while their children participate. Parents are welcomed, but not required, to stay for the ScienceWORKS program for children ages 6 to 9.

On February 2, Director of Athletics and Physical Education teacher, Erin Kent will lead children 5 and under in “Gym Time Tumble and Climb”, a session that will get kids moving through age-appropriate obstacle courses and exercise activities. “Sometimes it is hard for any of us to stay active in the cold winter months. We will guide the children through fun activities that will keep them moving from start to finish.” said Kent. This session will be held in the M. V. “Mike” Williams Gymnasium.

Also on February 2, Lower School Science Teacher, Donna Simmons will lead a ScienceWORKS session for children ages 6 to 9. In ScienceWORKS children will cycle through a series of stations to solve problems, explore material properties and get a better understanding of science in our everyday lives all while having fun and perhaps getting a little messy. This session will be held in our Lower School Science Lab.

Ms. Simmons will also lead a session on February 9 for the youngest scientists. Science Buddies is designed for children ages 3 to 5 and will be held in the Little School at Kent School. Preschool age children will be filled with a sense of wonder with some hands-on science exploration in a fun, engaging setting

On February 23, Kent School Librarian, Julia Gross and Music Teacher, Matthew Wirtz ‘99 will join forces in a Stories and Songs session for children 5 and under. Girls and boys can look forward to some interactive storytelling and music making as well as fun activities using stories and songs. This session will take place in the Kent School Library.

All Saturday Sneak Peek sessions are planned with several breaks so the participants can move around, explore the School facilities and other campus features. Children should be dressed for outdoor play as well as indoor activities. Tricia Cammerzell, Assistant Head of School for Advancement said, “We are so proud of our school and the work we do here, we want others to get a glimpse of our unparalleled environment for learning. These Saturday Sneak Peek sessions are a great way to showcase our teachers’ passion for what they do and our gorgeous, riverside campus.” Cammerzell will be on hand to offer tours of the school to anyone interested.

For more information about Kent School visit www.kentschool.org, email tcammerzell@kentschool.org or call 410-778-4100 ext. 110. Kent School, located in historic Chestertown, MD is an independent day school serving children from Preschool through Grade 8. The School’s mission is to guide our students in realizing their potential for academic, artistic, athletic, and moral excellence. Our school’s family-oriented, supportive, student-centered environment fosters the growth of honorable, responsible citizens for our country and our diverse world.

Kent School Students Compete in School Level National Geography Bee

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Last January 11, Kent School students in grades four through eight competed in the 2019 school-level National Geographic Geography Bee. Lennox Franks, a sixth grade, student won the school-level competition and a chance to compete in the Maryland State Bee.This is the first time Lennox has made it to the finals of the school-level Bee. Fifth grade student, Lia Schutwas the runner-up this year. After several rounds in the school Bee, Lennox and Lia emerged as the finalists and the two battled through several tie-breaker rounds with questions about South America, Central America and Asia.

Two students qualified in preliminary rounds completed in fourth through eighth grade earlier this month.  Finalists were: Peri Overton and Tyler Dunlap (4th grade) Alternate, Oliver Morris competed in place of Peri since she was not able to attend, Harrison Laveryand Lia Schut (5th grade), Lennox Franks and Gavin Larrimore (6th grade), Allie Butler and Eddie Gillespie (7th grade), and Kolby Brice and Aiden Lafferty (8th grade.)

Winner and Runner up: Lennox Franks and Lia Schut

Patrick Pearce, Middle School History and Geography teacher at Kent School coordinated the Bee this year. “I am grateful to my colleagues and special guests for helping to coordinate and judge the 2019 Geo Bee. I am proud of all of the students who competed last Friday. In her next step of the competition, Lennox will take a written test to see if she qualifies to move on to the Maryland State level.”

According to the National Geographic Bee web page, “Each year, thousands of schools in the U.S. participate in the National Geographic Bee using materials prepared by the National Geographic Society.  The contest is designed to encourage teachers to include geography in the classrooms and spark student interest in the subject and increase public awareness about geography.”Pearce continued, “The National Geographic Bee fits seamlessly with Kent School’s commitment to history and global studies. Our students learn about the world and different habitats in Kindergarten. Global Studies continues in third grade and is woven through the middle school history curriculum in grades five through eight as the students explore American History and our connection with countries around the globe.”

For more information about Kent School visit www.kentschool.org, email tcammerzell@kentschool.org or call 410-778-4100 ext. 110. Kent School, located in historic Chestertown, MD is an independent day school serving children from Preschool through Grade 8. The School’s mission is to guide our students in realizing their potential for academic, artistic, athletic, and moral excellence. Our school’s family-oriented, supportive, student-centered environment fosters the growth of honorable, responsible citizens for our country and our diverse world.

Washington College to Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. on January 21

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Students and faculty at Washington College have planned a series of events that will take place throughout campus on Monday, January 21 to honor the great American civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. A concert by the Grammy-nominated M.S.G. Acoustic Blues Trio caps off a day of community service and learning led by the college’s Black Student Union.

The M.S.G. Acoustic Blues Trio concert will take place at 5:30 pm in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall. The trio offers an evening of classics for the community to sing along to – acoustic blues, roots, spiritual music, and house-party tunes that are both uplifting and heart-wrenching, performed in the legendary Piedmont style. The band includes the accomplished harmonica player Jackie Merritt, Miles Spicer on guitar, and lead vocalist and percussionist Rosa Gibbs. Sponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the concert is free and open to the public.

The Martin Luther King Day of Service and Learning kicks off with an “MLK Read-In” at 2:00 p.m. on Martha Washington Square (in the case of inclement weather, the location will be Gibson Center for the Arts). Washington College students, staff, and faculty will recite some of King’s most famous readings and speeches, including the I Have A Dream speech. Local students and community members are invited to join in with their own selected readings, poetry, and reflections on what Martin Luther King, Jr. means to them. Participating students and community members will be given priority to share their thoughts and readings at the speak-in.

From 4:00 – 5:00 pm volunteers will gather in The Egg in Hodson Hall to pack supplies for the Caring for Kids Backpack Program. This program provides lunches to qualifying elementary and middle school programs throughout the weekends when they do not have the support of school lunches.

“I have never looked at MLK Day as a day off, but instead as a day of serving those around me…our vision is to allow the community and students to have a day where they can serve each other in a meaningful way that would honor MLK and his service to the nation,” says Paris Mercier, president of Washington College’s Black Student Union.

This year’s campus event celebrating the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. coincides with the return of Washington College students from winter break. It offers an ideal opportunity for the community to come together in a meaningful way to renew their own commitment to King’s work in civil rights, social justice, and economic equality.

For more information contact Starr Center Deputy Director Patrick Nugent at pungent2@washcoll.edu or 410-810-7157.

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