Mya Lixian Gosling to Speak at Washington College Oct. 3

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We all know that Shakespeare is wildly clever, but is he so fun that he’s worthy of stick figure comic art? That’s what webcomic artist and author Mya Lixian Gosling, the creator of Good Tickle Brain, thinks, and she’s hoping other people will think so, too.

Gosling will speak about her art, writing, and the silly side of Shakespeare on Wednesday, October 3, in Hynson Lounge, located in Hodson Hall. The event, which is part of the annual Sophie Kerr Lecture Series, will start at 4:30 p.m., and is free and open to the public.

Good Tickle Brain, the world’s foremost (and possibly only) Shakespeare stick figure webcomic, has been posted twice-weekly online at goodticklebrain.com since 2013. Gosling has degrees from Oberlin College and the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a Southeast Asian language cataloger at the University of Michigan Graduate Library.

For more information on this and other English Department and Sophie Kerr events, visit the website at www.washcoll.edu/departments/english/events.php, or view our annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/8293-2018-19-literary-events-brochure.

Paul Ortiz to Speak at Washington College Oct. 2

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Paul Ortiz, an expert in the fields of African American history and Latino studies, will visit Washington College on Oct. 2, discussing his book An African American and Latinx History of the United States.

Sponsored by Black Studies Program, Latin American Students Association, and the William James Forum Fund, the event at 5 p.m. in Litrenta Hall of the Toll Science Center is free and open to the public. A book signing will follow.

An associate professor of history in the University of Florida, Ortiz is also the director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program. He specializes in African American history, Latino Studies, the African Diaspora, Social Movement Theory, U.S. History, U.S. South, labor, and documentary studies.

His book Emancipation Betrayed: The Hidden History of Black Organizing and White Violence in Florida from Reconstruction to the Bloody Election of 1920 received the Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore Book Prize from the Florida Historical Society and the Florida Institute of Technology. He also co-edited and conducted oral history interviews for the award-winning “Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Tell About Life in the Jim Crow South.”

Ortiz is currently writing a book on settler colonialism, which will be part of Beacon Press’s new ReVisioning American History series.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Alexandra Cox, Juvenile Justice Scholar to Speak at WC Sept. 27

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Is America’s juvenile justice system itself a crime against young offenders? In her recent book, Trapped in A Vice: The Consequences of Confinement for Young People, sociologist Alexandra Cox reveals that a system that claims to promote positive change in the lives of the young people, more often than not, enmeshes them in a cruel web of injustice.

Cox will discuss her research and findings at Washington College on Thursday, September 27 at 5:30 p.m. in Litrenta Lecture Hall, Toll Science Center. Cosponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the Department of Sociology, and the Justice, Law & Society Program at Washington College, the program is free and open to the public. A book signing will follow.

Spending many years working with incarcerated teenagers, Cox researched and witnessed firsthand the lives of the young people and adults in New York’s justice system. Her talk will focus on the ways that the system, rather than the crimes themselves, acts as a vise in the lives of young people, pushing them to change through the use of intensive interventions and services, but also pulling them away from meaningful opportunities for growth and development.

“Alexandra Cox is the epitome of an engaged scholar: a superb researcher and analyst who also describes powerful firsthand experiences,” said Adam Goodheart, the Starr Center’s Hodson Trust-Griswold Director. “Through her vivid writing and persuasive arguments, Cox emerges as an eloquent advocate for some of our nation’s most vulnerable citizens. Her work is an exemplar for students in many different fields.”

Cox is a lecturer at the University of Essex (UK) in the Department of Sociology. She previously was an assistant professor at the State University of New York at New Paltz in the Department of Sociology. Prior to getting her Ph.D., she worked in the fields of criminal justice and drug policy reform at the American Civil Liberties Union’s Drug Law Reform project, the Drug Policy Alliance’s Office of Legal Affairs (in California) and the Neighborhood Defender Service of Harlem. A research fellow at Yale Law School, she was awarded a Gates Cambridge Scholarship and served as a Soros Justice Advocacy fellow.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

A Panel Discussion of Latin America Experts on September 24

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Four experts in Latin America politics and cultural issues will be featured in Washington College’s Goldstein Program in Public Affairs event on Sept. 24,a panel discussion that will examine the issue of immigration in the era of President Donald Trump.The experts will discuss how the framing of immigration as a security issue—a major policy shift from prior administrations of both political parties—and the accompanying rhetoric have had a profound impact on immigration from Latin American countries and Latinx communities within the United States.

The distinguished panelists include Gregory Weeks, Ana Patricia Rodríguez, Adriana Beltrán, and Adam Isacson. The talk at 7 p.m. in Hynson Lounge at Hodson Hall is free and open to the public.

Gregory Weeks is associate dean for academic affairs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at UNC Charlotte. He has published several books and dozens of articles on Latin American politics, U.S.-Latin American relations, and Latino immigration. He is editor of the academic journal The Latin Americanist and writes regularly on his blog Two Weeks Notice: A Latin American Politics Blog.

Ana Patricia Rodríguez is associate professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and U.S. Latina/o Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. She has published widely on Central American transnational cultural production. She is the author of Dividing the Isthmus: Central American Transnational Histories, Literatures, and Cultures (University of Texas Press, 2009). Presently, she serves as the president of the Latina/o Studies Association (LSA) and is completing a book manuscript on trauma and (post)memory in the Central American diaspora.

Top: Gregory Weeks, Ana Patricia Rodríguez. Bottom: Adriana Beltrán, Adam Isacson

Adriana Beltrán is the director of WOLA’s Citizen Security Program, where she promotes policies that address the root causes of violence and improve the effectiveness and accountability of police and judicial systems. She is the co-author of the pivotal study “Hidden Powers,” documenting the rise and impact of clandestine criminal organizations in Guatemala. Beltrán was a long-time advocate for the establishment of a UN-sponsored commission to investigate and prosecute organized criminal networks, which culminated in the creation of the International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG). Last year, with partners based in the region, Beltrán launched the Central America Monitor to ensure that international assistance is strategically targeted and to evaluate progress in the region to reduce violence, strengthen the rule of law, and tackle corruption through a series of indicators.

Adam Isacson is the director of WOLA’s Defense Oversight program, which monitors U.S. cooperation with Latin America’s security forces, as well as other security trends. Isacson accompanies WOLA’s Colombia program on peace and security issues, which has a central focus for his Isacson’s Defense Oversight work. Since 2011, Isacson has also focused on border security. He has visited the U.S.-Mexico border about 20 times, and has also completed field research along nearly the entire border between Mexico and Guatemala. A prolific writer and coder,Isacson has produced over 250 publications, articles, book chapters, and policy memos over the course of his career. He has created several websites, from blogs to standalone web apps. He hosts WOLA’s podcast, Latin America Today.

The Louis L. Goldstein Program in Public Affairs was established in 1990 to encourage students to enter public service by introducing them to exemplary leaders in and out of government. It has hosted journalists, political activists, foreign policy analysts, diplomats, military commanders and government officials of national and international stature. It also sponsors lectures, symposia, and visiting fellows, as well as student participation in models and conferences and other projects that bring students and faculty together with leaders experienced in developing public policy. Its current curator is Christine Wade, Professor of Political Science and International Studies, a highly sought expert on Latin American politics,  and author and editor of several books on Latin America, including Captured Peace: Elites and Peacebuilding in El Salvador.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

The Annual Cardboard Boat Race on September 22

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It wouldn’t be Fall Family Weekend at Washington College without the annual Cardboard Boat Race, which is set to take place September 22 during the Center for Environment & Society’s “Get to Know CES Waterfront Festival.” As always, the public is invited to Wilmer Park from 1-4 p.m. to enjoy food, beer, live music, and the always entertaining Cardboard Boat Race. This year the event will take place immediately following the dedication of the new Hodson Boathouse, at 11:30, also open to the public.

CES staff will be on hand discussing, and sometimes demonstrating, their innovative and educational programs. Visit each booth for a chance to win a 90-minute cruise on the Chester River for up to ten people on the research vessel Callinectes, or a guided tour of beautiful River and Field Campus at Chino Farm, including Foreman’s Branch Bird Observatory and the native Grasslands Restoration Project. Stop by the trivia table to test your CES knowledge and win a T-shirt. Other activities include river cruises aboard the 46-foot Callinectes ($5 per person), kayaking, and paddle boarding on the Chester River.

The Cardboard Boat Race is open to individuals, businesses, schools, civic groups, and non-profit entities in Kent or Queen Anne’s counties. Over $650 in prizes will be awarded for the winners of categories including First Around the Course, Best Construction, Most Team Spirit, and the ever-popular People’s Choice. College President Kurt Landgraf and his wife, Rita, will be on hand to help with the judging.

The deadline for registration is September 20, and participants must be at least 12 years old. All boats go on display at 12:30 p.m. on race day. Captains and crew meet at 2:45 p.m., the popular boat parade begins at 2:50, and the race starts at 3:00 sharp along the Pavilion in Chestertown’s Wilmer Park.

Registration is at https://12annualcardboardboatrace.eventbrite.com and costs $15 per team. For boatbuilding tips, go to https://www.washcoll.edu/centers/ces/chestertown-riverfest/cardboard-boat-building-tips.php.

In case of foul weather, activities may be cancelled.  For information contact Jamie Frees at 410-810-7162, jfrees2@washcoll.edu or visit https://www.washcoll.edu/centers/ces/chestertown-riverfest/cardboard-boat-regatta.php. Events are organized by the Center for Environment & Society at Washington College for Fall Family Weekend.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Washington College Dedicates the New Hodson Boathouse Sept. 22

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Rowers, sailors, donors, and community members will join Washington College President Kurt Landgraf and other dignitaries on Sept. 22 to dedicate Hodson Boathouse, the first bright new gem on the College’s evolving waterfront on the Chester River.

The event at 444 South Cross Street, Chestertown, begins at 11:30 a.m. and is open to the public, with a light reception to follow.

In celebrating the opening of the new boathouse, Landgraf will be joined by representatives of The Hodson Trust, which donated $2.5 million to the project; Regis de Ramel ’97, a member of the College’s Board of Visitors and Governors and crew team alumnus, who made a $1 million gift; donor Ann Horner ’80, also of the Board of Visitors and Governors; Athletics Director Thad Moore; and Alex Kincaid ’19, captain of the men’s rowing team.

After the dedication, Moore and others will christen a new Resolute rowing shell for the women’s rowing team in honor of former women’s team Coach Mike Davenport. This will bring to three the number of Resolute varsity shells for the growing women’s team.

Support for the $5 million Hodson Boathouse, which broke ground last fall, came from more than 150 donors, including former team members and other alumni. Located next to the Lelia Hynson Pavilion, the new boathouse is 9,200 square feet, about 3,600 square feet feet of which comprises a wraparound deck that offers expansive views for events and regattas.

The building houses locker rooms for the rowing and sailing teams, bathrooms, two offices, a team lounge, a 35-seat classroom, and an ergonomics training room with 32 stationary rowing machines. A state-of-the-art tank room with a 16-station, 25-by-54-foot rowing tank enables rowing team members to perfect their sweep technique and practice when the weather is too cold or inclement for on-the-water training.

With environmental sustainability at the forefront, Hodson Boathouse is heated and cooled by an energy-efficient geothermal well system, lighting is entirely LED, and the deck is made of recycled plastic. As noted by the building’s designer, the architecture and engineering firm HGA, “Water is one of the most important elements of the site for the College because of the focus on the Chester River as an area of study; therefore, water usage and protection of the watershed through rain gardens and shoreline mitigation plantings were identified early on as primary concerns for project performance. The project is designed for resiliency in the face of rising sea levels and changes to the watershed by raising the building up on piers.”

In addition to the rowing and sailing teams, the new boathouse will be a gathering place for the Chester River Rowing Club, a group of master racers and recreational rowers, and a focal point for community waterfront events, among them the 12th Annual Cardboard Boat Race & Waterfront Festival, hosted by the Center for the Environment & Society, which will follow the dedication, from 1 – 4 p.m.

Parking is available in the Wilmer Park parking lot and in the Chestertown Municipal lot on the 200 block of Cannon Street. A shuttle service will also be running from the front of the College’s Casey Academic Center starting at 11 a.m.

Please RSVP to https://bit.ly/HodsonBoathouse and fill out the form. For more information call 410-778-7849.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Chaucer & Jephthah’s Daughter—A Talk by David Wallace on Sept. 12

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David Wallace, professor of English and author of literature on the work of Geoffrey Chaucer and other medieval writers, will speak at the Rose O’Neill Literary House on Wednesday, September 12. The event, which is part of the annual Sophie Kerr Lecture Series, will start at 4:30 p.m., and is free and open to the public.

Wallace has been the Judith Rodin Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania since 1996. He is a Fellow of the English Association and is currently President of the Medieval Academy of America. He is the author or editor of ten books, including Chaucerian Polity (Stanford, 1999), The Cambridge History of Medieval English Literature (Cambridge, 2002), Strong Women (Oxford, 2011), and Geoffrey Chaucer: A New Introduction (Oxford, 2017). In 2016, Oxford University Press published Europe: A Literary History 1348-1418, a revolutionary literary history that breaks with older nationalist models. His primary commitments are to Europe and European literatures, to the performance and enjoyment of poetry (especially Chaucer), and to helping secure a viable future for younger scholars.

For more information on this and other English Department and Sophie Kerr events, visit the website at www.washcoll.edu/departments/english/events.php, or view our annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/8293-2018-19-literary-events-brochure.

Washington College Makes Purple a Priority

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Washington College stands with Kent County by going purple in support of Kent Goes Purple – a county-wide initiative meant to alert the community about substance abuse. From lighting and decorating sections of the campus purple to participating in the 5K Color Fun Run on September 9, Washington College plays a significant role in educating students on prevention and intervention on all forms of substance abuse.

“We support this initiative because any level of awareness we could generate for the community helps our students,” says Washington College president Kurt Landgraf. “It’s important for all of us to have an appreciation of the destructive nature of substance abuse, and for those who are addicted to misuse – there is help.”

The Washington College Office of Prevention, Education and Advocacy requires all first-year students, along with individuals who may demonstrate substance use and/or misuse, to take online courses for substance abuse prevention and intervention. The College also provides a personalized intervention and prevention course for those who may be using illicit drugs and/or misusing prescription drugs.The information provided specifically in this course aims to: recognize how psychoactive drugs affect the brain; identify types and categories of psychoactive drugs; understand addiction, tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal; and learn what to do in case of overdose.

On campus, most of the College’s public safety officers have received NARCAN training to administer naloxone, a medication that can countereffect opioids, in the event of an accidental overdose.

To learn more about Kent Goes Purple, register for the Kent Goes Purple 5K Color Fun Run, or to donate, visit: www.kentgoespurple.org. Follow Kent Goes Purple on Facebook at www.facebook.com/KentGoesPurple/.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

A Tea & Talk on Chapbooks at the Rose O’Neill Literary House

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The Rose O’Neill Literary House is proud to showcase two Washington College poets, Dr. Kimberly Quiogue Andrews and Literary House Assistant Director Lindsay Lusby, during a tea and talk on Wednesday, September 5, as part of the fall Literary House Series. Andrews and Lusby will be discussing their recently published chapbooks, and the talk will be followed by a book sale and signing. The event will be held at 4:30 p.m. at the Rose O’Neill Literary House, and it is free and open to the public.

Kimberly Quiogue Andrews is a poet, literary critic, and author of the chapbook

Dr. Kimberly Quiogue Andrews and Literary House Assistant Director Lindsay Lusby.

BETWEEN, which won the 2017 New Women’s Voices prize from Finishing Line Press.Recent creative work has appeared in GristThe RecluseThe Shallow EndsThe Arkansas InternationalPoetry NorthwestUnderblong, and other venues. She is an assistant professor of English and creative writing at Washington College.

Lindsay Lusby is the author of two chapbooks, Blackbird Whitetail Redhand (Porkbelly Press, 2018) and Imago (dancing girl press, 2014), and the winner of the 2015 Fairy Tale Review Award in Poetry, judged by Joyelle McSweeney. She is the assistant director of the Rose O’Neill Literary House, where she serves as assistant editor for the Literary House Press and managing editor for Cherry Tree, Washington College’s national literary journal.

For more information on these events or the Literary House, visit the website at www.washcoll.edu/centers/lithouse, or view the annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/7406-2017-2018.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.