Cristina Jiménez Headlines New “Crossing Cultures” Series on April 16 at WC

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Photo credit: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Cristina Jiménez—immigration reform advocate, MacArthur Foundation “genius award” Fellow, and founder and CEO of the nation’s largest immigrant youth-led organization—will speak at Washington College on Tuesday, April 16. She will share the powerful story of her own journey, from arriving in the US at age 13 as an undocumented immigrant from Ecuador, to her current role in the forefront of the global conversation on immigration. In 2018, Time magazine named Jiménez one of the “100 most influential people” in the world.

The program begins at 5:30 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall.  Hosted by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the event is free and open to the public. This event is the inaugural program in the Starr Center’s series “Crossing Cultures,” an initiative that seeks to foster informed dialogue on immigration, migration, intercultural exchange, and their impact on American life.

“At a moment when discussions of immigration and migration are dominated by soundbites, half-truths, and social-media hits, it’s more essential than ever to seek informed perspectives and engage in thoughtful civic conversation,” said Adam Goodheart, the Starr Center’s Hodson Trust-Griswold Director. “We’re excited to welcome Cristina Jiménez as the first of a diverse array of guests in the timely new Crossing Cultures series.”

Cristina Jiménez is the co-founder and executive director of the United We Dream (UWD). She has organized immigrant youth and workers for the passage of pro-immigrant policies at the local and national levels for over a decade. As undocumented immigrants, she and her family experienced poverty, abuse by police, wage theft from employers, and fear of deportation.

Her story is similar to those of United We Dream members across the country who struggle every day to overcome the forces of racism, xenophobia, and misogyny, and who ultimately learn to thrive. Jiménez will discuss how those closest to the pain are closest to the solution and how immigrant youth have transformed politics to create an empowered generation.

From a young age, Jiménez made a decision to fight back against unjust practices that plagued people of color and the immigrant community. As an adult, she was instrumental in organizing the successful national campaign that led to the creation and implementation of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival Program (DACA). Under Jiménez’s leadership, United We Dream has grown to a powerful network of 48 affiliates in 26 states and over 400,000 members.

Jiménez has received several high-profile awards and honors, including Forbes’s “30 under 30 in Law and Policy;” and “40 under 40 Young Leaders Who are Solving Problems of Today and Tomorrow” by the Chronicle of Philanthropy. Prior to her work at UWD, Jiménez co-founded the New York State Youth Leadership Council, and the Dream Mentorship Program at Queens College. She holds a master’s degree in Public Administration and Public Policy from the School of Public of Affairs at Baruch College, CUNY.

Established in 2000, Washington College’s Starr Center explores the American experience in all its diversity and complexity, seeks creative approaches to illuminating the past, and inspires thoughtful conversation informed by history. Jiménez’s talk is cosponsored by the Department of History, Program in American Studies, Department of Modern Languages, Hispanic Studies, Black Studies, Department of Education, Cleopatra’s Sisters, Día de Futbol, the Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology, and the Office of Intercultural Affairs.

 

About Washington College
Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Gene Demby to Speak at Washington College on April 17

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American journalist and blogger Gene Demby will speak on Wednesday, April 17, at the Rose O’Neill Literary House. The event, which is part of the annual Sophie Kerr Lecture Series, will start at 4:30 p.m., and is free and open to the public.

Demby is the lead blogger for NPR’s Code Switch team where he covers issues on race, ethnicity, and culture. He is also cohost of the weekly Code Switch podcast. Before coming to NPR, he served as the managing editor for Huffington Post’s BlackVoices following its launch. He later covered politics.

Prior to that role he spent six years in various positions at The New York Times. While working for the Times in 2007, he started a blog about race, culture, politics, and media called “PostBourgie,” which won the 2009 Black Weblog Award for Best News/Politics Site.

For more information on this and other English Department and Sophie Kerr events, visit the website at www.washcoll.edu/departments/english/events.php, or view our annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/8293-2018-19-literary-events-brochure.

 

About Washington College
Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Award-Winning Author Diana Butler Bass at Washington College April 10

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Theologian and author Diana Butler Bass, whose book Grateful: The Transformative Power of Giving Thanks was recognized this year as the top non-fiction book in national secular media by the esteemed 70-year-old Wilbur Awards, will speak at Washington College on “Politics of Gratitude: The Subversive Vision of the New Testament in the Age of Trump.”

Sponsored by the College’s Institute of Religion Politics and Culture and Political Science Department, the talk on April 10 in Hynson Lounge begins at 5 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

Bass is an author, speaker, and independent scholar specializing in American religion and culture. She holds a Ph.D. in religious studies from Duke University and is the award-winning author of ten books, including Grounded: Finding God in the World —A Spiritual Revolution (HarperOne, 2015), Christianity After Religion: The End of Church and the Birth of a New Spiritual Awakening (HarperOne, 2012) and Christianity for the Rest of Us: How the Neighborhood Church is Transforming the Faith (HarperOne, 2006).

Her latest book, Grateful: The Transformative Power of Giving Thanks (HarperOne, 2018), won the 2019 Religion Communicators Council’s Wilbur Award for the best book in non-fiction secular media (the fiction award was won by Mitch Albom for The Next Person You Meet in Heaven). Conferred since 1949, the Wilbur Awards honor excellence in secular media—print and online journalism, book publishing, broadcasting, and motion pictures—for communicating religious issues, values, and themes. Previous winners include Oprah Winfrey, Morgan Freeman, and films like “Chocolat” and “Hidden Figures.”

Along with her books, Bass’s bylines include The Washington PostThe New York Times Syndicate, and The Huffington Post. She has commented widely on religion, politics, and culture in the media including USA TODAYTimeNewsweek, CBS, CNN, FOX, PBS, NPR, Sirius XM, and CBC. In addition to the Wilbur, she has won other numerous grants and awards including the Nautilus Gold Medal, the Book of the Year from Religion News Service, and the Frank S. and Elizabeth D. Brewer Prize of the American Society of Church History.

About Washington College Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Revolutionary War Scholar Patrick Spero at Washington College April 4

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Historian Patrick Spero, whose study of the 18th-century frontier is bringing a new perspective to the roots of the American Revolution, will give a talk on April 4 about the forgotten story of a band of rebels, known as the Black Boys, whose protests helped ignite the battle for American independence.

Spero, librarian and director of the American Philosophical Society Library in Philadelphia, will discuss his new book, Frontier Rebels: The Fight for Independence in the American West, 1765 -1776, at the Toll Science Center’s Litrenta Hall. The program begins at 5:30 p.m. and will be followed by a book signing. Sponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the event is free and open to the public.

Publishers’ Weekly starred review praises Frontier Rebels: “[Spero delves] deeply into previously underutilized sources. .  . Spero’s thoughtful work is an important contribution to ongoing reassessments of the nature and meaning of the American founding.”

While the familiar narrative of the origins of the American Revolution focuses on taxation and the colonies along the eastern seaboard, in the west frontiersmen clashed with the British Empire over Indian relations. When Britain launched an expedition into the American interior to open trade with the Indian warrior Pontiac, the Black Boys led an uprising to stop it. Spero asserts that suspicion and distrust of both Natives and imperial aims fueled the flames of rebellion on the frontier years before the Declaration of Independence.

As a scholar of early American history, Spero has published books, essays and reviews on the American Revolution, including Frontier Country: The Politics of War in Early Pennsylvania (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), and the edited anthology The American Revolution Reborn: New Perspectives for the Twenty-First Century (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016). Prior to his appointment at the American Philosophical Society, Spero served on the faculty at Williams College.

Spero has been involved in a number of public history initiatives throughout his career, including serving as historian at the David Library of the American Revolution, leading teacher workshops for the Gilder-Lehrman Institute and National Endowment for the Humanities, lecturing about political leadership to business professionals and special groups, consulting on exhibits and other projects, and serving on various boards.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Joe Trippi, Democratic Campaign Strategist, at Washington College March 28

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Master political strategist and MSNBC commentator Joe Trippi will visit Washington College on Thursday, March 28, 2019 for an open discussion/Q&A on politics and current events. Heralded on the cover of The New Republic as the person who “reinvented campaigning,” Trippi has been at the forefront of progressive politics for nearly 30 years.

The event, sponsored by Washington College’s Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience as part of the Harwood Series in American Journalism, is free and open to the public. It begins at 4:30 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall. A conversational format will permit audience members to join a lively discussion with Trippi, covering everything from ongoing investigations of the Trump administration, to the fast-developing field of contenders for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination.

Trippi is best known for his work on the campaigns of Democratic presidential candidates, including Barack Obama, Howard Dean, and Edward Kennedy, as well as in Senate and congressional races, including Alabama senator Doug Jones’s dramatic upset of Republican candidate Roy Moore. According to The Atlantic, Trippi’s influence on Democratic Party politics has been profound and lasting, especially his strategy of pursuing small-dollar online donations: “Every single campaign uses Trippi-patented tactics to raise money.” He frequently appears as a commentator on MSNBC, CBS, and Fox News, and has over 800,000 Twitter followers.

Washington College’s Harwood Lecture Series in American Journalism was established to honor the distinguished career of the late Washington Post columnist and ombudsman Richard Harwood, who served as a trustee of the College, as well as a teacher and mentor of undergraduate journalists. Speakers in the series have included many leading figures in politics and the press. Additional cosponsorship assistance comes from the Department of Political Science, the Washington College Democrats, and the Louis L. Goldstein Program in Public Affairs. The Starr Center, established at Washington College in 2000, explores the American experience in all its diversity and complexity, seeks creative approaches to illuminating the past, and inspires thoughtful conversation informed by history.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

WC Department of Theatre Announces Spring 2019 Performances

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The Washington College Theatre Department is pleased to present its Spring 2019 schedule of performances, including Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde, The Flick, and The Rape of the Sabine Women, by Grace B. Matthias.

Unless otherwise noted, all performances begin at 7:30 p.m. in Tawes Theater in the Gibson Center for the Arts. Tickets are available at the door, and for reservations, which are suggested, please visit the department’s eventbrite page.

“Our students routinely seek plays that challenge, delight, frustrate and provoke themselves, each other, and audiences,” says Chair and Theatre Associate Professor Michele Volansky. “I am so pleased at the ways that they choose to present their points of view and put their classroom learning to practice in these senior capstone experience projects. We hope that the Chestertown and Washington College community shares our excitement at the spring line-up.”

Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde by Moises Kaufman is a senior thesis directed by Jacqueline Glenn on Friday, March 22 and Saturday, March 23. In April 1895, Oscar Wilde brought a libel suit against the Marques of Queensberry, the father of his youthful lover, who had publicly maligned him as a sodomite. In doing so, England’s reigning man of letters set in motion a series of events that would culminate in his ruin and imprisonment. For within a year the bewildered Wilde himself was on trial for acts of “gross indecency” and, implicitly—for a vision of art that outraged Victorian propriety. Expertly interweaving courtroom testimony with excerpts from Wilde’s writings and the words of his contemporaries, Gross Indecency unveils its subject in all his genius and human frailty, his age in all its complacency and repression.  The Honorary Producers are Mike and Carin (Janet) Golze ’09.

The Flick by Annie Baker is a combined directing and acting senior thesis, directed by John Leslie and featuring Patrick Huff, taking place Friday, April 5 and Saturday, April 6 in Norman James Theatre of William Smith Hall. The Flick takes place in a seen-better-days movie theater, one of the last which continues to use a 35-millimeter film projector. The story focuses on the employees whose job is to sweep up other people’s trash after the movie ends and follows as they grapple to understand themselves and each other. Annie Baker’s play challenges the audience to consider how silence is louder than words, the uniting power of movies, and how moments of theater can be found in everyday activities.

The Rape of the Sabine Women, by Grace B. Matthias by Michael Yates Crowley is a senior thesis directed by Elizabeth Clemens and will be presented on Friday, April 12 and Saturday, April 13. As described by The Playwrights Realm, “When Grace B. Matthias is raped, her world spirals into chaos. Between navigating emotionally unstable guidance counselors, overbearing lawyers, an angry championship football team, and useless Wikipedia answers, Grace tries to make sense of her world anew. A complex collision of satire and dark comedy, The Rape of the Sabine Women, by Grace B. Matthias fearlessly explores rape culture in America.” The honorary producers are John Beck ’05 and Carol Landis ’06.

For questions, please email Michele Volansky at mvolansky2@washcoll.edu. The Gibson Center for the Arts is located on the Washington College campus, 300 Washington Avenue, Chestertown. For more information: http://drama.washcoll.edu/

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations.With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

WC’s Goodfellow Memorial Lecture Presents “In the Kingdom of Devils” March 21

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Washington College welcomes Katherine Grandjean, associate professor of history at Wellesley College, for the 2018-2019 Guy F. Goodfellow Memorial Lecture, “In the Kingdom of Devils: The Harpe Murders and the Legacies of the American Revolution.”

Sponsored by the Department of History, the March 21 talk begins at 5 p.m. in Hynson Lounge and is free and open to the public.

Grandjean, who holds a B.A. in history from Yale University and a Ph.D. in history from Harvard University, researches early English colonization and the encounter with Native peoples, as well as the origins of American violence. In this talk, she discusses how on paper, the American Revolution ended in 1783, but for some, it continued. She investigates the violent legacies of the revolution, especially in the southern borderlands of the early republic. Following the lives of two brothers from North Carolina, who experienced some of the worst violence of the war as boys and, later in life, became killers, Grandjean will explore how the United States’s founding moment left behind so many violent, alienated men.

Grandjean’s work has been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the American Philosophical Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Historical Association, and the Charles Warren Center for American History, and has appeared in such journals as the William and Mary QuarterlyAmerican Quarterly, and Early American Studies. A recent essay, “New World Tempests: Environment, Scarcity, and the Coming of the Pequot War,” won the American Society for Environmental History’s 2012 Alice Hamilton Prize for Best Article and the William and Mary Quarterly’s 2014 Douglass Adair Memorial Award.

She recently published her first bookAmerican Passage: The Communications Frontier in Early New England

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations.With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Washington College Honors Mayor Chris Cerino and Rev. Bobby Brown

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Washington College honored two Chestertown luminaries—Mayor Chris Cerino and the Rev. Robert “Bobby” Brown—at its annual George Washington’s Birthday Convocation, conferring on both the President’s Medal.

College President Kurt Landgraf presented the awards, which recognize the accomplishments of an individual or organization that has made significant contributions to the advancement of Washington College or the regional community.

Landgraf lauded Cerino for his service to the community through both his time as mayor and as Director of Education for the Sultana Education Foundation. Specifically, he cited Cerino’s “wit, grit, and nimble thinking and action to shepherd what is unquestionably the town’s most ambitious and at times contentious capital project, the construction of the new Chestertown Marina. Poised to open this spring, the new marina will preserve the town’s maritime heritage and promote tourism by creating an iconic gateway to Kent County. It will be a major economic driver for Chestertown, and thanks to the collaborative efforts led by Mr. Mayor to develop this new front porch to our community in tandem with Washington College’s waterfront campus, it has helped cement the historic connection between the town and the College.”

Mayor Chris Cerino (left photo) and Rev. Robert “Bobby” Brown (right photo), together with College President Kurt Landgraf.

Landgraf praised Brown as a bridge-builder, collaborator, and galvanizer, quoting Washington College French Professor Katherine Maynard, who has worked with Brown on the “Your Vote, Your Voice” initiative, saying “He is a community leader who builds bridges across the dividing lines that sometimes run through Kent County.” Brown, now in his tenth year as pastor of the Bethel A.M.E. Church in Chestertown, also worked with College faculty and staff to create last year’s inaugural Community Unity Day.

“His is a spiritual force that inspires the very best in all of us, always reminding us of what we are capable of,” Landgraf said. “In his actions, he shows us every day what it means to be an engaged citizen in our community and our world.”

You can watch the entire Convocation at https://www.washcoll.edu/offices/digital-media-services/live/. The President’s Medal portion runs from 1:18 to 1:25 in the video.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations.With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Senior Reporter for Vox to Speak at Washington College March 7

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Jane Coaston, a senior politics reporter for Vox and a journalist and writer based in Washington, D.C., will give a talk on contemporary American politics and culture on Thursday, March 7. Sponsored by Washington College’s Richard Holstein Program in Ethics, which promotes ethics education in the classroom, across campus, and in the community,the event begins with a reception at 4:15 p.m. at Hynson Lounge, followed by the talk starting at 5 p.m. Both are free and open to the public.

Coaston has written for publications including The New York Times, The Washington Post, ESPN, and The Ringer. She grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio, and attended the University of Michigan before moving to St. Louis to work for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. She covered the 2016 election for MTV News by examining the Republican party and the American right wing in depth. She has also written about college football for Every Day Should Be Saturday and covered the NFL for SBNation. You can follow her on Twitter @cjane87.

Coaston’s visit includes a discussion with journalism students at Kent County High School, led by teacher Sarah McCown.

For more information, contact Michael Harvey, curator of the Richard Holstein Program in Ethics, mharvey2@washcoll.edu, 410-778-7889.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations.With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

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