Maryland 3.0: The Long View from Main Street Cambridge

Share

From a variety of perspectives, the growing awareness on the Mid-Shore that Cambridge has become a hot foodie destination should make anyone involved in improving town’s economic development pretty happy.

From the urban sophistication of Poplar Bistro to chef Patrick Fleming’s growing collection of eateries, Cambridge’s downtown is slowly but surely working its way out of the dark days of economic recession.

That change of events has undoubtedly made many in that town feel a sense of optimism that a robust and thriving downtown is just around the corner for a community that has taken some pretty hard knocks for many years.

But as Katie Clendaniel, director of Downtown Cambridge noted in her interview with the Spy at Bullitt House a few weeks ago, the road back to full recovery is a long and complex one.

While the hospitality sector is a critical factor in making that happen, the less noticeable work of improving walkability, adding traffic calming infrastructure and the expansion of high-quality residential housing all are part of a much larger plan that may take many more years to achieve the maximum impact of the economic life of downtown Cambridge.

For Clendaniel, who was part of the original team of Easton’s successful Main Street program several years ago, this kind of incremental change is the reality of almost any serious revitalization program. While frustrating for those seeking easy and quick answers, this slow process requires equal amounts of long-range strategic planning and the collective patience of the community.

This video is approximately seven minutes in length. For more information about Downtown Cambridge please go here

 

About Dave Wheelan

*

Letters to Editor

  1. Fletcher Hall says:

    It is most encouraging to see Cambridge making progress in its redevelopment,

    As a native of Dorchester County, I fondly remember spending many evenings in Cambridge while growing up.

    There was a variety of businesses and other venues to draw you to come to Cambridge. One of my favorites was “Judge” Whitey Barth’s candy shop and soda fountain.

    Being located on Race Street, it was handy when I worked at Legget’s Department Store when on college breaks.

    Back in the day. Looking at the history, the decline and fall of the Philips Packing Company, Cambridge Wire Cloth Company and the waning of the seafood industry were early harbingers of the economic trials Cambridge has experienced,

    Carpe Diem!

Write a Letter to the Editor on this Article

We encourage readers to offer their point of view on this article by submitting the following form. Editing is sometimes necessary and is done at the discretion of the editorial staff.
×
We're glad you're enjoying The Chestertown Spy.

Sign up for the the free email blast to see what's new in the Spy. It's delivered right to your inbox at 3PM sharp.

Sign up here.