Historical Society to Offer Lectures at Chestertown Tea Party

Share

At the invitation of the Tea Party Committee, the Historical Society of Kent County will present three lectures, given by Mark Croatti, during Tea Party weekend.  The subjects include: ”The Articles of Confederation: America’s First Constitution”; “The 14 Presidents Before George”, and “Annapolis, the Bridge between the Revolution and the Constitution”.  Additionally, Benjamin Franklin will be in attendance to give his views on the lectures!

 Mark Croatti

Mark Croatti

The first lecture is scheduled at 4PM on Friday, May 27 at the Bordley History Center, 301 High Street, seating is limited to the first 50 people.  (America’s First Constitution)

The second lecture is scheduled at 5PM Saturday, May 28 at Town Hall, second floor, 118 N. Cross Street.  Please reserve a seat by calling 410-778-3499.  At this event, a presentation will be made to Louisa Duemling, who is a direct descendent of Pierre du Pont who wrote the draft of the Treaty of Paris.  There will also be a recreation of the signing Treaty of Paris! (14 Presidents before George)

The final lecture is scheduled for 12:30, Sunday, May 29 at the Bordley History Center, 301 High Street.  Seating is limited to the first 50 people. (Annapolis: the Bridge between the Revolution and the Constitution)

Mark Croatti teaches American government and foreign-policy related courses at the American University, George Washington University, and the United States Naval Academy.  He also covers politics for Annapolis magazine and is the Director of the Annapolis Forum.

Christopher Lowell has appeared as Benjamin Franklin since 2004 coast-to-coast and abroad He presents in both English and French.

These are lectures that you do not want to miss! Please ensure to arrive early to reserve a seat for the lectures given at the Bordley History Center.

 

Write a Letter to the Editor on this Article

We encourage readers to offer their point of view on this article by submitting the following form. Editing is sometimes necessary and is done at the discretion of the editorial staff.