“A Musical Journey” by Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble Set for March 19

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The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble celebrates music from different parts of the world in its third concert of the season, “A Musical Journey.” Music Director Dr. Keith A. Wharton will conduct this free concert, beginning at 4 p.m. on Sunday, March 19, at Emmanuel Episcopal Church at Cross and High streets, Chestertown. The church is handicapped-accessible, via the ramp and automatic doors on the courthouse-green side of the building.

Front row, L-R: Dianne Cimba, Monica Rosanova, Charles Thai, Antoinette Smith, Helen Noble, Jodi Bortz, Amanda Carter, Carla Gerber, Brenda Lyons. 2nd row: Ann Baldwin, Kathy Blyman, Marge Fallaw, Katie Williams, Ray Diedrichs, Ann Carter, Isabella Williams, George Boyd, Aaron Locke, Kyle Webb. 3rd row: Donald Greene, Brad Hollomon, Charlie Kallay, Laurie Quinn, Joe Diamond, Christopher Harrison, Grace Kelley, Eric Bishop, Glaeden Boyd, Keith Wharton (Director). 4th row: Skylar Landis, Frank Gerber, Jim Pileggi, Christopher Grant, Sheila Walker. Joined since photo taken on 12/4/16: Brayden Buie, Elizabeth Bergstrom, Alexus Abner, Sam Carter, Bob Hamel, Gregory Jones.

Front row, L-R: Dianne Cimba, Monica Rosanova, Charles Thai, Antoinette Smith, Helen Noble, Jodi Bortz, Amanda Carter, Carla Gerber, Brenda Lyons. 2nd row: Ann Baldwin, Kathy Blyman, Marge Fallaw, Katie Williams, Ray Diedrichs, Ann Carter, Isabella Williams, George Boyd, Aaron Locke, Kyle Webb. 3rd row: Donald Greene, Brad Hollomon, Charlie Kallay, Laurie Quinn, Joe Diamond, Christopher Harrison, Grace Kelley, Eric Bishop, Glaeden Boyd, Keith Wharton (Director). 4th row: Skylar Landis, Frank Gerber, Jim Pileggi, Christopher Grant, Sheila Walker. Joined since photo taken on 12/4/16: Brayden Buie, Elizabeth Bergstrom, Alexus Abner, Sam Carter, Bob Hamel, Gregory Jones.

Several of the pieces on the program have a jazz theme. “Single Petal of a Rose,” by Duke Ellington, will be played on the bass trombone by James Pileggi, accompanied by Virginia Andrews on the piano. It is one of the seven movements of the “Queen’s Suite” that Ellington wrote for Queen Elizabeth II, who was presented with a single pressing of the recording (which was not commercially issued during Ellington’s lifetime). “A Night in Tunisia,” by John “Dizzy” Gillespie and Frank Paparelli, is a jazz standard that helped to pioneer the Afro-Cuban style of the 1940s. The arrangement played for this concert features the saxophone section and alternates between Latin and swing styles, as did the original.

A movie set in an exotic place is the basis for “Themes from Lawrence of Arabia,” by Maurice Jarre. It is taken from the epic film of the same name and consists of an Arabian motif with blazing color and almost barbaric effects plus the Lawrence theme, a haunting, poignant melody that reflects both his love of the desert and his internal psychological conflicts.

Spain’s tragicomedy hero Don Quixote is celebrated in “Suite from Man of La Mancha,” by Mitch Leigh, that captures the Spanish spirit embodied in its classic themes: “Man of La Mancha,” “Dulcinea,” “Little Bird,” and “The Impossible Dream.” Spain is again represented by “La Paloma,” a popular Spanish song written by the Basque composer Sebastián Yradier, who died soon after composing it and never knew just how popular his song would become.

The music of central Europe is represented by “Friska,” an arrangement for band of the finale from Franz Liszt’s “Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2.” “Friska” is the name of the fast Hungarian dance that inspired the fast section of the finale.

A mythological note is struck by the opening fanfare from “La Peri,” ballet music by Paul Dukas that was his last major work. It tells the story of a man’s search for immortality and his encounter with a mythical creature, the Peri.

Robert W. Smith’s “Rites of Tamburo” is an eclectic blend of various musical styles drawn from many different cultures around the world. It uses percussion for its driving force and draws upon the concept of celebration, both liturgical and secular, of human existence.

The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble is an all-ages community concert band. It was formed in 2001 to offer area wind and percussion musicians the opportunity to continue or return to the pleasures of playing quality music in a large ensemble. New members are always welcome, without audition or fee.

Rehearsals for the next concert, on May 21, will begin on March 20. They start promptly at 7:00 p.m. and run until 8:30 p.m. in the Washington College band room in Gibson Center for the Arts. For further information, call 410-778-2829. The ensemble is partially supported by a grant from the Kent County Arts Council.

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