Senior Nation: The Dixon House 99ers by Amy Blades Steward

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When you meet Ellen Walbridge and Helen Crow, residents of Dixon House in Easton, you won’t suspect that they are both 99 years old. Both women are vibrant and enjoy recalling their full and rich lives. This is the case for several residents at The Dixon House in Easton.

According to Linda Elben, Executive Director, “We are seeing more and more residents coming to us later in their lives, in their 90s, still very active and living quality lives. Most just need to simplify their living and have less responsibilities.”

She adds, “These two women are remarkable. They join a number of our residents who are centenarians or who approaching 100 years of age. It is a testament to them living active lives surrounded by family and friends.”

Ellen Walbridge, a resident of Dixon House, will turn 100 in February 2019.

Ellen Walbridge, born in West Virginia, had ties to the Eastern Shore. At age 15, she followed her brother, who came to work at Fike Orchard in Skipton. While living here, she met Alvin Walbridge at a church social and the rest is history. Over the years, she supported her husband who started Walbridge Builders. Family is very important to her. She and her husband had five children, one boy and four girls. She now has 10 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren.

Walbridge moved to The Dixon House in 2017 after living independently. When asked about the reason for longevity, she states that her brother lived until age 96 and she never drank or smoked. She was active in 4-H, loved to garden (she tends the flowers at The Dixon House), and enjoyed knitting, crocheting, and sewing. She also loves to bake, helping with the baking activities at The Dixon House, and lemon meringue pie is her specialty. She comments, “I don’t feel real young, but I don’t feel 99.” She will turn 100 in February 2019.

Helen Crow, a resident of Dixon House, will turn 100 in April 20.

Born in rural Ohio, Helen Crow was always physically active. Her father, a builder, was also a physically active person. Helen recalls doing handstands and headstands when she was young. Today, she doesn’t miss an exercise class at The Dixon House. She and her husband, Elmer, nicknamed “Amo” married after Amo served in the Army’s 17th Airborne Division as a paratrooper during World War II. The two had three children, and today she has three grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Amo had a career as a master craftsman, training many young men who entered the flooring trade, while Helen did office work for a law firm, then a refinery.

Both Helen and Amo participated in an activities group for art in Cincinnati, where Helen enjoyed oils and watercolors and Amo enjoyed stained glass, caning, and pottery. The two also enjoyed music, attending Cincinnati Symphony concerts for 40 years. The couple retired to Florida and then to Easton, where their son, Roger and daughter-in-law Heather live. The two then came to live at The Dixon House in 2014. Crow comments, “Easton is a nice town. We were amazed at the quality of friends we have made at Dixon House.” She adds, “I have had a good life.”

The mission of The Dixon House is to provide high quality and affordable residential care to seniors in an enriching home-like environment. For further information, contact Linda Elben, Executive Director at 410-822-6661 or visit dixonhouse.org.

Kent County Health and Wellness Expo Set for October 18

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HomePorts, Inc. and Kent County Public Schools, in partnership with the Kent County Health Department, the University of Maryland Shore Regional Health, and Anne Arundel Medical Center, will hold the annual Health and Wellness Expo on Thursday, October 18, 2018, 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. at Kent County High School in Worton.

This year’s Expo, which is free and open to the public, is the largest ever held in this area. The event will highlight over 75 community resources offering the latest health, wellness and safety information. It is a one-stop opportunity for busy individuals and families of all ages. Features include:

– Free health screenings
– Free Morning Refreshments
– Flu Shots
– Twelve Talks by Local Medical Professionals
– Over 75 exhibitors, both non-profit organizations and local businesses
– Lunch available for purchase

Expert talks, by physicians from both Shore Regional Health and Anne Arundel Medical Center and other health care practitioners, will include:

– Mental Health In Later Life – Dr. Allan Anderson, Geriatric Psychiatrist
– Ten Signs of Alzheimer’s and Dementia – Cynthia Prud’homme, Education Coordinator, Alzheimer’s Association
– Sleep Problems – Dr. Fernando Cruz DeLeon, University of Maryland Shore Regional Health
– Hormone Replacement Therapy: Risks and Rewards –Dale Jafari, Nurse Practitioner, University of Maryland Shore Regional Health
– Exercise/Physical Fitness Programs in Kent County – Dr. Paul Simonetti, Physical Therapist, Chestertown Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
– Facts and Myths of Hospice Care – Heather Guerieri, RN, MSN, CHPN, Executive Director, Compass Regional Hospice
– How Can Grief Support Help – Rhonda Knotts, MCC, Supervisor of Grief Services, Compass Regional Hospice
– Urogynecology and Pelvic Health – Dr. Briana Walton, Obstetrician/Gynecologist, Anne Arundel Medical Center
– Cardiovascular Health – Dr. Juan Cordero, Cardiologist, Anne Arundel Medical Center
– Diabetes: Strategies for Lowering Your HA1C – Doris Tate, Diabetes Management Nurse Practitioner, University of Maryland Shore Regional Health
– Pain Management During the Opioid Epidemic – KURE pain management
– Stress Management – Patricia Deitz, Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Chester River Behavioral Health

“This is an event people shouldn’t miss, according to Wayne Benjamin, M.D., event director.  “It is a once-a-year opportunity for free screenings and a huge variety of useful information- something for everybody. I especially want people to know about and take advantage of the classroom information sessions led by health care experts on 12 different topics. Everyone, I guarantee, will come away with new information and be better prepared to manage their own health and their family’s health.”

The school gym will be transformed into a large exhibit hall, with tables staffed by professionals offering a wide variety of information and guidance on local services. For information on exhibiting, contact Greer Davis, 410-708-2993 or ggbdavis@gmail.com. The deadline for exhibitor sign-up is September 15.

In addition, at 12.30 p.m. there will be a forum with candidates for Kent County Commissioner, who will address topics of community concern.

For more information, email karen@homeports.org or visit www.homeports.org.

HomePorts is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit membership organization providing adults in greater Kent County, Maryland, age 55 and above,  with a wide range of services they want and need to remain safe and confident living in their own homes. Founded in 2008, HomePorts is among a rapidly-growing number of member-driven “villages” developing around the country.  HomePorts is supported by annual membership fees from more than 80 households and contributions.

Compass Regional Hospice Volunteer Trainings Scheduled for September, November

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Compass Regional Hospice will offer two training sessions for individuals interested in becoming a patient care volunteer.

The first session will be an online/classroom hybrid session, beginning in September. Volunteers can complete their online classes before joining Compass Regional Hospice for the classroom segment, which will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesdays; Sept. 11, 18 and 25, at Compass Regional Hospice’s main office, 160 Coursevall Drive, Centreville.

Registration is required and completing the entire class is necessary for volunteers who wish to provide companionship and support to Compass Regional Hospice’s patients and their loved ones in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties.

Another volunteer session is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 6, 7 and 8, and will take place in Caroline County in the conference room at the Caroline County Chamber of Commerce (USDA building), 9194 Legion Road, Denton.

Volunteers who recently completed a patient care training are, from left, Cheryl Conaway-Dill, Michele Bennetta, Barbara Jacquette, Nancy Toy, Janet Davis, Pat Holland, Barbara Stanton and Cynda Pittcock.

“Volunteers are a vital part of the care we provide,” said Courtney Williams, manager of volunteer and professional services for Compass Regional Hospice. “It is all about helping others and being there when they need you; whether that is in our hospice centers in Centreville and Chestertown, or wherever a patient calls home.”

Topics taught during the trainings include an overview of hospice, the process of dying, spiritual care and its place in hospice care, the stages of grief, effective communications techniques, family dynamics, stress management and self-care for caregivers.

Compass Regional Hospice relies on more than 300 volunteers of all ages to support its mission of “Care on your terms.” These individuals volunteer their time in a variety of ways. Whatever your motivation to volunteer, there is a place for you at Compass Regional Hospice.

“Our volunteers provide an invaluable asset to our patients and their caregivers by the gift of their time,” Williams said. “The support that volunteers provide in our facilities allows our staff to be in more places, and our families to receive better care. Being able to offer our patients volunteer visits that provide companionship and socialization helps to improve their quality of life.”

For more information about becoming a volunteer for Compass Regional Hospice, contact Courtney Williams at 443-262-4112 or cwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org, or visit www.compassregionalhospice.org/volunteers to download the patient care volunteer training registration form.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a life-limiting illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville and Chestertown. Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one, through The Hope and Healing Center. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

Maryland 3.0: Ralph Meima Does a Start-Up Out of Heron Point

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The term “entrepreneur,” which has grown very popular these days, is a revered one in this era of the internet and creative business models. Described as one who  organizes and operates a business with financial risk, is it also a title for some of the most creative people in any community.

And that word would describe Ralph Meima to a tee. A product of the Landon School, Yale, years of university study in Mexico, and a first career in the U.S. foreign service, Ralph found himself in early retirement for family reasons and started a series of companies, beginning with a import-export business specializing in marine parts in 1982. Almost forty years later, at the age of 91, he’s still at it.

Now living with his wife, Barrie, at Heron Point at Chestertown, the urge to create is still part of Ralph’s daily routine. In fact, he’s recently launched a new specialized service where he reviews dozens of the most popular boating magazines in the country monthly, and summarizes his findings for boating trade executives, saving them countless hours of homework.

In the Spy’s continuous search to profile our unique community we talked to Ralph at Heron Point a few weeks ago about his native entrepreneurship.

This video is approximately five minutes in length. 

Senior Nation: Dixon House’s Hazel Newnam Celebrates 100 Years

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Pictured back row, left to right: Granddaughter Sheila Herbert, Sheriff Joe Gamble, Mayor Robert Willey, Senator Addie Eckardt, Delegate Chris Adams, Delegate Johnny Mautz, grandson Cooper Towers, and Wendy Towers. Pictured front row, left to right: Granddaughter Courtney Springer, daughter Debbie Kudner holding great-granddaughter Elisabeth Claggett, Hazel Newnam holding great-grandson Gabriel Claggett, grandson Bo Claggett holding great-granddaughter Francesca Claggett. Absent from the photo is great-grandson Cruz Springer.

She credits her long, healthy life to a good attitude, good friends and her Christian faith. Hazel Newnam, age 100, a resident at Dixon House for the last three years, embraces life. Fiercely independent, Hazel managed to live alone until coming to Dixon House. She had visited a friend at Dixon House for years and when it came time to make the transition to assisted living herself, Dixon House seemed like the logical next step. She recently gathered with family, friends and dignitaries to celebrate her 100th birthday. Newnam was honored with proclamations from Governor Hogan, the Maryland Senate, the Maryland House of Delegates, the County Sheriff’s Department, the Town of Easton, and even a letter from President Donald Trump. Music was provided by Cabaret-style singer Daryl Grant Lindsay.

She commented at the event, “It was so wonderful to celebrate with family. I think it’s wonderful they all remembered me.”

Newnam was born on August 2, 1918. A native of Clairton, PA, she met William “Bill” Newnam while he was working construction in Pennsylvania and after he had graduated from the Pittsburgh Aeronautical Institute. The two were married in 1940 and then Bill became a Marine and flew Corsairs in Japan as part of the U.S. peacekeeping efforts during World War II. The couple lived in Oxford in the late 1940s after the war ended. Bill brought a Corsair back to Talbot County to sell war bonds. Soon after, he purchased Maryland Airlines, a private charter business, where he continued his love of flying.

Bill imparted his love of flying to Hazel by teaching her how to fly when she was in her 50s. She comments, “The opportunity was there and I took it. I felt like I was doing something special and I enjoyed the whole experience. Knowing I could fly gave me confidence and Bill was really proud of me.”

The couple ran Maryland Airlines until the 1990s and during this time Bill also managed Easton’s Airport. They had two daughters, Suzanne Towers (now deceased) and Debbie Kudner. Today Hazel has four grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.

After her husband died in May 1991, the Airport name was changed to Easton Airport/Newnam Field, in memory of Hazel’s husband, Bill.

She states, “I tried to live the right kind of life. I stayed active with the Oxford Methodist Church, sang in the choir, lead the MYF, and served as a member of the WSCS. I also served a number of years as a volunteer for the Memorial Hospital Auxiliary.”

Hazel’s daughter, Debbie Kudner, recalls, “Mother was totally independent and had lots of friends. She used to load up the Cadillac, which I called the ‘Gospel Bus,’ and take trips up and down the East Coast with her church friends.”

Today, Hazel’s days are a little quieter, but she still enjoys getting out. The recent celebration at Dixon House was a testimony to her love of a good time.

The Inaugural Eastern Shore Research Forum on September 10

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Integrace Bayleigh Chase and the Integrace Institute have announced that the Easton life plan community will host the inaugural Eastern Shore Research Forum on Monday, September 10. Aging services, healthcare and research professionals are invited to learn about current research studies being done to examine how new technologies can be used to better deliver health care and other support to older adults.

The event’s keynote speaker will be Jody Holtzman, founder and senior managing partner at Longevity Venture Advisors, LLC. Named one of 2017’s “Top Influencers in Aging” by Next Avenue, Holtzman is the former Senior Vice President of Market Innovation at AARP and has worked for more than 10 years to create programs that spark innovation and entrepreneurship for Americans over the age of 50.

Research projects will also be presented by representatives from:

– University of Maryland, School of Medicine
– University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy
– New York University School of Medicine
– The Erickson School at UMBC

“This event gives us the opportunity to showcase how technology providers and researchers are working together to create solutions that can improve quality of life for older adults and those who care for them,” said Tabassum Majid, PhD, Executive Director, The Integrace Institute. “We hope our attendees will see how technology can help people access health care differently, which can be life changing, especially in rural communities such as Easton.”

Continuing education units (CEUs) will be available for social workers, long-term care administrators and activity professionals in attendance.

Registration for the inaugural Eastern Shore Research Forum is available for $65 and includes breakfast and lunch. Those who register before August 17, students, and groups of three or more are eligible to register for the discounted price of $55.

Registration is available online at integraceinstitute.org/eastern-shore-research-forum. Those seeking more information may contact Stephanie Carideo at the Integrace Institute at 410-552-3238.

About Integrace Bayleigh Chase

Located on a 35-acre campus in historic Easton, Bayleigh Chase is a not-for-profit life plan community that affords residents a lifestyle of flexibility and choice to live life on their own terms. Bayleigh Chase offers independent living options in its villas, cottages and apartment homes, as well as a continuum of supportive living services, including assisted living, neurocognitive support, outpatient and short-term rehabilitation, skilled nursing and diagnostic and treatment support through the Samuel and Alexia Bratton Neurocognitive Clinic. For more information, please call 410-763-7167 or visit www.bayleighchase.org.

About the Integrace Institute
The Integrace Institute is the not-for-profit research and education arm of Integrace, whose mission is to transform neurocognitive living through person-centered research, education and partnerships. With over 20 years of expertise, the Integrace Institute serves Integrace’s communities by building an evidence-based platform for care practices and education. In addition, it partners with universities, technology and pharmaceutical companies, and other senior living organizations outside of Integrace to conduct community-based research studies, provide interactive learning experiences for professionals and caregivers, and consult with other organizations to build innovative models that support meaningful living. For more information, please visit www.integraceinstitute.org or call 410-970-2031.

About Integrace
Integrace is a forward-thinking non-profit organization that strives to ignite in all people the passion for meaningful living. Integrace oversees a family of vibrant senior living communities in Maryland, including Bayleigh Chase in Easton, Buckingham’s Choice in Adamstown, and Fairhaven in Sykesville. Integrace is also a nationally-recognized leader in the art of neurocognitive support, with the Sykesville-based Copper Ridge community and Integrace Institute, as well as two neurocognitive clinics in Easton and Sykesville, serving as catalysts to a profound shift in how we perceive, and relate to, those living with Alzheimer’s, dementia and many other forms of cognitive change. Integrace communities provide a continuum of services to support both residents and the greater community, including assisted living, skilled nursing, short-term rehabilitation and more. Each of these innovative programs focuses on person-centered living, honoring the abilities, possibilities and authenticity of each individual. For more information, please visit Integrace.org.

Compass Regional Hospice Events, August through October

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August…

Camp New Dawn — Saturday, Aug. 18, through Tuesday, Aug. 21, at Camp Pecometh, 136 Bookers Wharf Road, Centreville. A four-day, three-night grief retreat summer camp for children, teens and families, through Compass Regional Hospice. For more information or to register, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org.

September…

Volunteer Training Session — An online/classroom hybrid where volunteers can complete their online classes before joining Compass Regional Hospice for the classroom segment. We will be meeting from 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesdays; Sept. 11, 18 and 25, at the Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. Registration is required, and completing the entire class is necessary for volunteers who would like to work with patients and families. For more information about volunteering, contact Courtney Williams at 443-262-4112 or cwilliams@compassregionalhospice.org.

Grief Support Group—An eight-week support group that begins Wednesday, Sept. 12, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., at Compass Regional Hospice’s main office, 160 Coursevall Drive, Centreville. An eight-week grief support group open to anyone who has lost a spouse or significant other. For ages 18 and older. The group will be facilitated by grief counselors Linda Turner and Ann OConnor. The registration fee is $25, but no one will be turned away based on an inability to pay. For more information or to register, contact Linda Turner at lturner@compassregionalhospice.org or Ann OConnor at aoconnor@compassregionalhospice.org

Estate Treasures Art Auction — Saturday, Sept. 22, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Cascia Vineyards, 1200 Thompson Creek Road, Stevensville. Featuring silent and live auctions, including a variety of art, some created and signed by local artists whose work reflects scenes from the Eastern Shore. Enjoy light refreshments and a complimentary glass of Cascia Vineyards wine. Tickets are limited for this exclusive event and are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. All proceeds will benefit Compass Regional Hospice. Estate Treasures is an affiliate of Compass Regional Hospice. For more information and to purchase tickets, contact Kenda Leager, at 443-262-4106 or kleager@compassregionalhospice.org.

Community 5K Run to Benefit Compass Regional Hospice— Saturday, Sept. 29, at 9 a.m. at Kent Island Athletic Club, 448 Kent Narrow Way N., Grasonville. Come out to the Kent Island Athletic Club to take part in a 5K to benefit hospice and grief support services through Compass Regional Hospice. For more information, contact Kenda Leager, development officer, Compass Regional Hospice, at 443-262-4106 or kleager@compassregionalhospice.org. To register for the run, contact Mark Fromert, member and race organizer, Kent Island Athletic Club, at 410-827-5527.

October…

Estate Treasures Fashion Show and Luncheon — Monday, Oct. 15. Doors open at 10:30 a.m. At Prospect Bay Country Club,311 Prospect Bay Dr W., Grasonville. This event will feature an upscale boutique, luncheon, cash bar, bake sale, raffle and live auction. Tickets are $40 and there is limited seating available. Proceeds will benefit Compass Regional Hospice. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact Kenda Leager at 443-262-4106 or kleager@compassregionalhospice.org.

Sporting Clay Tournament— Saturday, Oct. 20. Registration at 9 a.m. and all shooters must be on the course by 11:30 a.m. At Schrader’s Outdoors, 16090 Oakland Road, Henderson. The event will include Lewis Class Scoring, 75 targets, 5 stand shooting, a side game, a catered lunch and an awards ceremony. Registration is $100 for an individual shooter, $75 for a junior individual shooter (17 and younger) and $400 for a team of four shooters. Proceeds benefit Compass Regional Hospice. For sponsorship information or to register, contact Kenda Leager at 443-262-4106 or kleager@compassregionalhospice.org.

Ongoing…

Bereaved Parent Grief Support Group — First Monday of each month; Aug. 6, Sept. 3 and Oct. 1. From 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at The Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, dealing with the loss of a child. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org.

HALOS-Healing After a Loved One’s Suicide Grief Support Group — Second Wednesday of each month; Aug. 8, Sept. 12 and Oct. 10. From 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at The Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, dealing with the loss of a loved one from suicide. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org, or Wayne Larrimore at 443-262-4108 or wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Drug Overdose Grief Support Group — Third Thursday of each month; Aug. 16, Sept. 20 and Oct. 18. From 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at The Hope and Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive, Centreville.  A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, dealing with the loss of a loved one from drug overdose. For more information, contact Rhonda Knotts at 443-262-4109 or rknotts@compssregionalhospice.org, or Linda Turner at 443-262-4120 or lturner@compassregionalhospice.org.

All Losses Grief Support Group — Fourth Tuesday of each month; Aug. 28, Sept. 25 and Oct. 23. From noon to 1:15 p.m. at the Caroline County Public Library, Federalsburg branch, 123 Morris Ave., Federalsburg. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, who have experienced any type of loss. Please bring a lunch. For more information, contact Wayne Larrimore at 443-262-4108 or wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Time Change for Compass Regional Hospice’s All Losses Grief Support Group

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All Losses Grief Support Group — Fourth Tuesday of each month; July 24Aug. 28 and Sept. 25From noon to 1:15 p.m. at the Caroline County Public Library, Federalsburg branch, 123 Morris Ave., Federalsburg. A drop-in group for individuals, 18 and older, who have experienced any type of loss. Please bring a lunch. For more information, contact Wayne Larrimore at 443-262-4108 or wlarrimore@compassregionalhospice.org.

Compass Regional Hospice – Care on your terms

Compass Regional Hospice is a fully licensed, independent, community-based nonprofit organization certified by Medicare and the state of Maryland and accredited by the Joint Commission. Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been dedicated to supporting people of all ages through the challenge of living with a life-limiting illness and learning to live following the death of a loved one. Today, the organization is a regional provider of hospice care and grief support in Queen Anne’s, Kent and Caroline counties. “Care on your terms” is the promise that guides staff and volunteers as they care for patients in private residences, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and the residential hospice centers in Centreville and Chestertown. Grief support services are offered to children, adults and families of patients who died under hospice care, as well as members of the community who are grieving the loss of a loved one, through The Hope and Healing Center. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice, visit compassregionalhospice.org.

Senior Nation’s Ask Irma: My 86 Year Old Mom is Falling More Often Now

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Senior Nation is committed to offering resources to help us deal with the challenges and opportunities of aging. To that end, we are launching a new monthly column called “Ask Irma” by Irma Toce, where we focus on all topics related to aging.

Dear Irma,

Mom has been falling more these past few weeks, should we place her in a nursing home? She is 86 and currently lives alone

**************************
Thank you very much for your question.

First of all let’s have a look in mom’s home. Are there any trip hazards? Area rugs, lots of furniture, different flooring in different rooms, stairs etc.

Secondly how is mom’s diet? Is she eating well balanced meals and snacks throughout the day.

Does mom exercise, does she take yoga or balance classes?

Thirdly, and most importantly, is she drinking enough fluids throughout the day (8 glasses of water) Dehydration is a common cause for dizziness, urinary track infections etc. all of which can cause a person to fall. This is the season to hydrate even more because of the heat and humidity.

There could be numerous causes for a person to fall, I only mentioned a few but please have mom checked by her physician to rule out any medical issues.

Take care!

Irma

Irma Toce is the  CEO of Londonderry on the Tred Avon with over 25 years experience work with seniors. Her years of experience in the field is accompanied by BS in social work and an MA in health management, Irma not only leads the dynamic community of Londonderry, but she is also nationally recognized as an expert in the field of aging.