Hogan Administration Announces Grants for Historic Preservation Projects

Share

As part of Governor Larry Hogan’s Regional Cabinet Meeting in Cambridge, Special Secretary for Smart Growth Wendi Peters and Maryland Department of Planning (Planning) Secretary Robert McCord today announced seven projects selected to receive Historic Preservation Capital Grants from the Maryland Historical Trust (MHT) at a ceremony in nearby Easton. The event was held at one of the seven sites receiving an award – the historic Easton Armory, which is owned and operated by Waterfowl Chesapeake and serves as the home of the Waterfowl Festival, a yearly event first held in 1971.

“The State of Maryland is rich in its historically significant and diverse architecture, proud heritage, and cultural traditions,” said Governor Hogan.  “It is important that we recognize and preserve our history all across the state, and our administration is pleased to restore this vital funding.”

For the first time in nearly a decade, Governor Hogan restored funding for the Historic Preservation Capital Grant Program, which assists bricks-and-mortar historic preservation projects. MHT received more than 70 applications for projects competing for the $600,000 in available grants, demonstrating strong demand for the funding within communities across the state. Organizations can request up to $100,000 per project; awards range from $34,000 to the full $100,000.

The Capital Grant Program provides support for physical preservation projects as well as for architectural, engineering, archeology, and consulting services needed in the development of a construction project.  Acquisition of properties can also be funded.  All assisted properties are either listed on or eligible for National Register of Historic Places designation.

Since its inception in 1978, the Capital Grant Program has awarded nearly $15 million for physical preservation measures to more than 500 historic properties in every county and Baltimore City. Non-profits, local jurisdictions, business entities, and individuals are all eligible applicants, encouraging a wide range of property owners or site stewards to apply.

MHT, an agency of the Maryland Department of Planning, was formed in 1961 to assist the people of Maryland in identifying, studying, evaluating, preserving, protecting, and interpreting the state’s significant prehistoric and historic districts, sites, structures, cultural landscapes, heritage areas, cultural objects, and artifacts, as well as less tangible human and community traditions. Through research, conservation, and education, MHT assists the people of Maryland in understanding their historical and cultural heritage.

Online applications for Fiscal Year 2019 Capital Grant funding will be available this fall 2018 on MHT’s website at http://mht.maryland.gov/grants_capital.shtml. Application deadlines and workshop dates will also be announced later this year.

For more information about the grant program, contact Courtney Hotchkiss at (410) 697-9514 or Courtney.hotchkiss@maryland.gov.

Details on the projects receiving grants are listed below.

Hammond-Harwood House (Annapolis, Anne Arundel County) ($100,000)

Grantee: Hammond-Harwood House Association, Incorporated (non-profit)

A National Historic Landmark, the Hammond-Harwood House is a symmetrical brick mansion with a five-bay center and smaller end wings. It was constructed in 1774 and is considered among the most significant Georgian residences of colonial America. The two-story end wings with polygonal bays were a very rare feature in America before the Revolution, and the house retains beautifully detailed exterior and interior features and woodwork. The architecture of the house is attributed to William Buckland, a British-born architect who designed many noted buildings and interiors in colonial Maryland and Virginia; several other buildings in Annapolis are attributed to him. There is a small addition on the south side from 1875, but essentially the building has remained unaltered. The house is currently used as a museum of fine and decorative arts and is open to the public. Funding will assist the restoration of windows and ceilings.

Stone House at Historic Elk Landing (Elkton, Cecil County) ($100,000)

Grantee: The Historic Elk Landing Foundation, Inc. (non-profit)

The Stone House at the Historic Elk Landing, built in 1782-83, is a 2-story stone construction with several features characteristic of 18th century vernacular dwellings in northeastern Maryland, including its center hall plan and corner fireplaces. It is significant for its association with early Scandinavian settlement in Maryland and as an important site on the mid-Atlantic’s northernmost navigable inland waterway. The property remained in the hands of one family from 1735 until its purchase by the Town of Elkton in 1999; the Historic Elk Landing Foundation was created the following year to lease and operate the site. The house is currently used for limited historical interpretation and fundraising activities. Grant funding will assist in the restoration of windows, doors, and framing.

Easton Armory (Easton, Talbot County) ($100,000)

Grantee: Waterfowl Chesapeake, Inc. (non-profit)

The Easton Armory was built in 1927 and is a large brick structure constructed in a fortress-like style; like many armories across the state, its design was overseen by Robert Lawrence Harris, who was state architect under the administration of Governor Albert C. Ritchie. The building served as an armory and social space for the Easton community until it was acquired by the Department of Natural Resources in 1976 and then by Waterfowl Chesapeake in 1997. The building is known locally as the “Waterfowl Building” since it is the home and headquarters for the Waterfowl Festival, which celebrates Eastern Shore heritage and wildlife. Funding will assist the rehabilitation of the windows and framing.

Union Mills Homestead – Shriver Grist Mill (Westminster, Carroll County) ($96,000)

Grantee: The Union Mills Homestead Foundation, Inc. (non-profit)

The Shriver Grist Mill at the Union Mills Homestead, constructed in 1797 and in use until 1942, is representative of early industrial development. An imposing and sturdily-built two-story structure of local brick, the mill once served as the nucleus for a complex which included the house and farm as well as a tannery, a cooper, and a blacksmith. The complex stands on an important early transportation route linking Maryland and Pennsylvania, a route which became Maryland’s first Rural Free Delivery (RFD) route in 1896. The homestead is still owned by the Shriver family, now on its seventh generation. The mill has been restored and is currently used as a museum with daily interpretive tours. Funding will go towards the rehabilitation of the water flume and mill works.

Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse (Anne Arundel County) ($100,000)

Grantee: United States Lighthouse Society, Incorporated (non-profit)

Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse, constructed in 1875 at the confluence of the Severn River and the Chesapeake Bay, is a hexagonal frame lighthouse, 1.5 stories high, supported by 9 steel frame screw piles which were uniquely suited to muddy, sandy soil conditions. An icon of the Chesapeake Bay, it is the only screw-pile lighthouse remaining in its original location on the Bay. In 1986, the lighthouse was the last on the Bay to be fully automated, and it is still used as an aid to navigation today. Funding will contribute to the rehabilitation of the exterior steel and iron foundation of this National Historic Landmark.

Wallace Office Building (Cambridge, Dorchester County) ($70,000)

Grantee: Historic Cambridge, Inc. (non-profit)

Completed in 1849-1850, the diminutive, columned Wallace Office Building was built as a law office by James Wallace, who later rose to prominence as a state legislator, Civil War hero, and early canning entrepreneur. Occupying a prominent corner, it is one of the earliest surviving commercial buildings in Cambridge and possibly the purest example of Greek Revival architecture in Dorchester County. It is currently vacant and undergoing rehabilitation; once complete, a local radio station plans to rent the space. Funding will assist the overall interior and exterior rehabilitation.

Clifton Mansion (Baltimore City) ($34,000)

Grantee: Friends of Clifton Mansion, Inc. (non-profit)

Clifton Mansion began life as a late 18th century farmhouse built for Captain Henry Thompson, who formed the First Baltimore Horse Artillery for the defense of the City in the War of 1812. Clifton was remodeled into an elaborate Italianate villa by a later owner, merchant and philanthropist Johns Hopkins. Hopkins hired the Baltimore architecture firm of Niernsee and Neilson to transform the house, adding a tower and creating grand interior spaces with elaborate finishes. In 1874, Hopkins bequeathed the property to the Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University as the site for a university, but his wish was never fulfilled, and in 1895 the City of Baltimore purchased the mansion and the 260-acre property for use as a park. Clifton Park was substantially improved to plans by the Olmsted Brothers between 1904 and 1917. The mansion is currently used as a community space and office space for non-profits. Grant funding will assist the restoration of the historic dining room, including its distinctive historic paint scheme and finishes.

South Fork Studio Receives Industry Recognition for Residential Project

Share

South Fork Studio, an Eastern Shore-based landscape architecture firm, was honored for the quality of one of its residential design projects by the American Society of Landscape Architects–Maryland Chapter during its 2018 Awards Banquet. The awards honor projects that demonstrate a superior quality of design and execution.

“This award is the culmination of a great partnership with our clients John Piper and Deborah Tuttle that continues today,” said D. Miles Barnard, Principal and Founder of South Fork Studio Landscape Architecture. “It’s satisfying to be recognized for the work we were able to produce, but also sets our expectations higher moving forward.”

The Chapter honored 11 projects in total; South Fork Studio was the only firm to receive an award for a single family residential design project – a Built Merit Award for a project on a 2 acre waterfront property in Chestertown, MD.

The initial design scope seemed straight forward enough says Barnard, “We were asked to provide three things: address drainage and erosion problems, create a secure garden area to keep in pets and children, and improve the circulation. We suggested a fourth element which was the incorporation of art into the garden. From there we were given complete design freedom which resulted in the construction of this project requiring the collaboration of over 10 local builders and artists. We rely on these colleagues to make our designs become reality and we feel grateful to them and to our clients for making this award possible.”South Fork Studio designed everything outside of the home including all the masonry steps and walls, gates, fencing, paving, soils, planting, lighting and irrigation.

This project is also featured on the cover of the May 2018 issue of Chesapeake Views Magazine

Click here to read the article: Chesapeake Views

To learn more about the Piper-Tuttle project, click here: Piper-Tuttle Residence

To learn more about South Fork Studio, please visit our website: http://southforkstudio.com/

More on South Fork Studio Landscape Architecture

South Fork Studio Landscape Architecture is dedicated to creating inviting, innovative and environmentally sustainable human spaces and native landscapes throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. Our mission is to create and nurture a direct connection between the landscape and the people that inhabit it. Whether designing a small intimate garden room or a commercial development, our philosophy is to focus on how the needs of the people are best served by the landscape and how the landscape can be maintained as a self-sustaining and functioning ecosystem.

More on the Maryland Chapter of ASLA

The Maryland Chapter represents approximately 365 landscape architects at the local level. The purpose of ASLA is to advance the profession of Landscape Architecture in the eyes of the general public. The Chapter is the main advocacy body to advances the profession on the local level by holding events, meetings, outings and providing information regarding the profession to the local media and schools. The Chapter may also interface with municipal governments regarding local issues that could impact the profession, or the public realm.

Renovations at Custom House

Share

Chestertown visitors and residents will see some changes happening at the Custom House at 101 South Water Street this summer, as the 18th-century building on the banks of the Chester River—the home of the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience—undergoes renovation.

The Custom House

The renovations to the interior and façade mark the culmination of a six-month planning process that involved the College, town, and state. The College has been working hard to eliminate deferred maintenance in all of its buildings, and work at the Custom House will include HVAC upgrades, recarpeting, repainting, gutter repairs, mold elimination, and repointing sections of the brick façade.

“We look forward to developing new spaces for oral history, public history, student internships, and community collaboration,” Starr Center Deputy Director Pat Nugent said. “The renovation work has been planned for quite some time now, and I’m very excited for the opportunities it provides us to re-imagine the role that this historic landmark can play in academic, student, and community life here in Chestertown.”

The restoration work will ensure the Starr Center’s continued place as an innovative leader in public humanities research and programming, allowing the center to grow its professional staff and student interns, while also configuring spaces to allow for an oral history recording studio and flexible student workspaces.

While Friday and Saturday Custom House audio tours will be postponed for the summer, the historic site will reopen to students, staff, and the general public in mid-August, just in time for the Starr Center’s exciting Fall 2017 line-up of public humanities programming open and free to the public. Keep an eye on the Starr Center’s website for more news about the renovation work and forthcoming public programs.

Gigabit County: The Future of Broadband and Its Implications for Kent County

Share

When Scott Boone, the IT Director for Kent County, speaks at events or attends meetings outside Kent County, he hands out plastic cards that say “Our Gigabit County is Open for Business!” on one side and on the other side show a map of the fiber loops that crisscross the county. The cards also contain a flash drive loaded with detailed information on how to start a business in the county.

Lately, he is giving out lots of these cards, because national organizations and many other rural counties want to know: How did Kent attract the money and the technical talent for a project that seems likely to make Kent the first rural county to provide very high speed internet access—up to a gigabit (1000 megabits) per second—to virtually every home, every school, and every business? How did it happen that Kent County, a relatively small place with less than 20,000 inhabitants, is now served by optical fiber backbones from four different providers—two of which are providing fiber to the home or business. In addition, Kent County is served by four wireless internet service providers that also offer high speed broadband connections for home or business. Few urban areas in the country and virtually no other rural counties have such a wealth of choice—of providers, speeds, and prices.

One answer is strong and sustained political support from the County Commissioners. William Pickrum was instrumental in attracting the county’s first wireless internet service provider back in 2004 and has remained an advocate for broadband services. Ronald Fithian suggested that the county enter the broadband project in a competition that resulted in an award from the Maryland Association of Counties. William A. Short has been active in overseeing the fiber buildout. Equally important, the county’s frugal practices over many years meant that it could afford the project’s $4.5 million cost without raising taxes. In addition, the county has licensed 3 wireless internet providers to place their equipment on county water towers rent free, if they also provide discounted service to certain low-income families with school-age children.

Another answer is vision. Scott Boone and County Administrator Shelley Heller designed the Request for Proposals that launched the project in a way that encouraged ambitious proposals. They and Jamie Williams, the county’s economic development director, believed that better access to broadband was critical for the future of education and healthcare in Kent County as well as for attracting new businesses and creating new jobs. Boone also reserved www.gigcounty.com and other on-line addresses and has designed an ambitious program to market the county’s new digital infrastructure.

A third answer is good timing. FTS Fiber, the winning bidder to the RFP, was planning to build a fiber ring with hundreds of individual optical fibers to connect a major internet exchange point in Ashburn, Virginia to a new undersea fiber link in Virgina Beach. The undersea link and the fiber ring serve clients who are very major users of the internet and wanted an additional route for internet traffic to and from Europe that did not go through New York City. FTS originally planned to build the eastern half of the ring down the Delmarva Peninsula by crossing the Chesapeake Bay below the Bay Bridge, but realized they could cross to Rock Hall and run the fiber through Kent County and the upper Eastern Shore just as well. (It didn’t hurt that Brett Hill, CEO of FTS, has a home on the Eastern Shore and so had a personal interest in bringing better connectivity to the region.) So FTS proposed to re-route its fiber ring and and to install an additional 110 miles of fiber in Kent County connecting 54 county government facilities, as well as to lay fiber to every home and business that requested it.

FTS brought in a retail partner, ThinkBig Networks, to lease the fibers, install customer equipment (optical fiber “routers” that provide in-home or in-office WiFi networks), and provide gigabit internet service. Under the contract, the county pays FTS $4.5 million for connecting its facilities (but in return will get 10 years of free service, dramatically lowering its internet and telecommunications costs). The county will also receive a portion of the fiber lease rentals from ThinkBig or other entities (including other internet service providers) that lease the fiber network.

Gigabit internet (1000 megabits per second) is unbelievably fast in today’s terms. You can download a whole season of your favorite Netflix or Amazon series in a few minutes. That kind of speed is ideal, perhaps even necessary, for what’s coming—streaming video for sports, news, and everything else, still higher definition TV sets that display 8 times as many pixels, virtual reality “tours” of popular destinations or imagined worlds. The global economy is increasingly being shaped by internet platform or cloud-based companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook that don’t make things but rather connect buyers and sellers, or connect people to information, or to each other. Soon banking and other financial services will be delivered the same way—through new and more secure internet platforms called blockchains—and a wide range of healthcare services will also be delivered on-line or by connecting smart, in-home devices to cloud-based algorithms and artificial intelligence diagnostic tools. Education, including Kent County Public Schools, is already moving to individualized, digital learning platforms for which students need to have internet access at home as well as in school.

So Kent County is likely to be uniquely prepared for this sea change in the way we live, learn, and work—if its citizens and businesses take full advantage of the gigabit infrastructure. And that should be easy, because the FTS fiber has stimulated other internet service providers to up their game as well. Atlantic Broadband has rushed to lay fiber to the home in several Kent County neighborhoods, trying to lock up customers before FTS gets there. The company now offers slower speeds (up to 120 megabits), but says that it is already offering gigabit service over its fiber in one town in Connecticut, and expects to eventually offer that level of service on the Eastern Shore as well. Verizon has fiber here as well, although it has yet shown no interest in providing fiber to the home. So does the Maryland Broadband Coalition, which only serves member entities such as Washington College.

There are also four wireless internet service providers active in the county—Bridgemaxx, Delmarva WiFi, Tidewater WiFi, and a new, well-financed entry, Cambio WiFi. They operate from towers—both county towers and commercial structures and even some grain elevators—and typically offer substantially slower speeds, 5 to 25 megabits. However, three of the wireless providers say they can offer customers as much as 100 megabits. (See the Service Providers below for listed speeds and prices.) Wireless links from a tower to a home or business usually can’t be longer than 5-7 miles and work best when there is line of sight (eg, no trees or buildings in the way), but newer technology has improved the ability to penetrate trees and to limit interference. (See theTechnology Primer below.) For customers that think they don’t yet need or can’t afford fiber speeds, wireless connections may be of interest.

There is still another possible tier of service, access over a shared WiFi hotspot. The county could provide such hotspots or license an internet service provider to do so for neighborhoods around each of the 50+ facilities where it has a fiber link: eight school buildings, 11 fire, police, or other public safety facilities, several libraries, municipal office buildings, and more than 20 public works, water treatment facilities, or similar locations. Similar hotspots could be set up around churches or community centers—indeed several churches in Kent County are already doing just that through a program of the Kent County Learning Center aimed at helping students. Hot Spot access could be subsidized (free) or by subscription.

In fact, just such a hotspot or wireless cloud is being planned on a larger scale to resolve the lack of mobile phone or internet coverage in Chestertown—via a partnership between the town, the county, Washington College, and FTS. The hotspot would cover the marina/waterfront area, the downtown business district at least up to Washington College, the entire college campus, and possibly other areas such as the proposed new KRM business park. The hotspot—similar to those found in sports stadiums or modern airports—would use advanced distributed antennas, each backed by fiber, and would provide not only WiFi access but also likely mobile phone connectivity for carriers that decide to participate (negotiations are underway). That means phones would reliably work either over the carrier network or over WiFi and that laptops and tablets would also work everywhere outside in the hotspot and likely in storefronts or restaurants as well. The distributed antennae network would have the capacity to serve large numbers of people—e.g., Tea Party Festival crowds. Of course, hot spots are typically not as secure as unshared internet connections—not the best place to do your internet banking, for example—so businesses and most homes will want their own fiber or wireless link. Nonetheless the hotspot will make Chestertown more connected than many major urban locations.

Just in time for Memorial Day, Cambio Wifi has created a junior version of the WiFi hotspot—centered on Fountain Park—with an antenna on the roof of The Finishing Touch. It’s modest in speed and capacity, up to 5 megabits, but its free, serves a pressing need, and is indicative of the entrepreneurial energy that the  Gigabit County project has unleased.

Implications

It seems obvious that high speed fiber, wireless, and mobile links will improve lifestyles—for residents and visitors. It will also improve the business environment. In one well-documented case, Chattanooga, Tennessee, experienced an economic boom after making fiber and internet access widely available and affordable. It became known as a start-up city, attracted many new businesses and experienced an in-migration of new residents, especially young people. Could Chestertown, and Kent County as a whole, experience a similar renaissance? In a way, it’s already happening. The proposed KRM business park, which will retain at least 300 Dixon Valve jobs for the area in a new headquarters complex and likely create that many more jobs from new businesses, would probably not have happened without the optical fiber network, according to KRM officials.

Moreover, the availability of the FTS fiber loop in the county already has some companies exploring the possibility of creating an internet data center—a server warehouse with thousands of data storage computers hosting cloud-based services—in the Millington Industrial zone. Sitting atop hundreds of optical fibers and close to an undersea link, as well as proximity to several major airports and the Rt. 301 highway, might in fact prove attractive to quite a few internet-dependent businesses. And these are precisely the kind of next-generation, low-impact business that would fit well in Kent County and bring highly-skilled talent to live here, as well as creating jobs for the increasingly tech-savvy students graduating from Kent County schools.

Universal connectivity would benefit many others as well. Consider the artisan/artist community in the county, and suppose that Gallery shows, First Friday events, and the annual studio tour happened on-line as well—on a YouTube channel, for example, and on Facebook, with links to artists’ websites. That way people in Washington, Baltimore, or Philadelphia could also participate virtually and strengthen their link to the county—and artists might sell more of their work.

Libraries in Kent County as elsewhere are becoming digital repositories. Did you know you could check out and download a Kindle book, without having to drive to the library—if you have internet access?  And that such digital library resources are poised to expand dramatically in the future—with instructional videos, interactive learning games, geneaology mapping tools?

The future of the Chestertown Hospital is in doubt, at least as a traditional in-patient facility. But what if it became, in addition, a telemedicine center for consults with remote specialists, a dispatching center for emergency transport via ambulance or helicopter in critical cases, even a hub of home-care nurses that visited new mothers and aging seniors on a regular basis, bringing medicines, mobile diagnostic tools, and a tablet for in-home video-consults with a doctor? What would it mean for people living alone to have a virtual assistant (like Amazon’s Alexa) ask each morning about pain levels, remind about medicines, or monitor for slips and falls and call for help emergency help if needed? The next few years will see a host of smart in-home devices and sophisticated on-line diagnostic tools designed to keep people healthier and out of hospitals or to detect strokes before they happen—making reliable internet access sometimes a matter of life and death.

And what do individualized digital learning platforms—like the ones Kent County Public Schools have already implemented—mean for student achievement, especially with universal student 24/7 access to the platform and other on-line tools from home?  Even without universal access, the results are already showing up with higher rankings in state-wide comparisons. But the next wave of instructional materials will make heavy use of virtual reality tools—to allow students to explore how a heart works, for example, or to understand how galaxies form—that are even more dependent on fast internet access. So it’s clear that broadband access is critical for Kent County’s next generation to succeed, as students prepare for lives in a world where many traditional jobs may not exist.

These and other implications of the Gigabit County will be the subject of other articles in this series. The Spy invites comment under its new Future Focus department, and hopes to further stimulate discussion and engagement via a series of guest lectures or moderated expert panels.

 A Guide to Internet Service Providers in Kent County

Prices and speeds quoted for residential service, based on information from the providers, but you are advised to call them to get a quote for your location and needs or for business service. Some providers offer discounted introductory prices. Install prices can vary.

Fiber

ThinkBig Networks. Unlimited Gigabit service (1000 Megabits) for $99/month over the FTS fiber.  Install $400 (can be spread over 3 years), which includes a sophisticated router. For now, this is the only gigabit provider in the county, offering speeds more than 8 times what any other provider can offer and at a price comparable or even lower than other providers’ high speed service. Mark Wagner, CEO of ThinkBig and an experienced IT professional, suggests that you think of the install fee as an investment that pays off over several years, since you will never need another internet connection. He says the company will be profitable with as few as several thousand customers across the Eastern Shore, that demand is brisk, and that he expects to have 1000 customers hooked up in Kent County alone by the end of the summer. He says the company is committed to the goal of universal access, and will be willing to work with the county to make that happen. www.ThinkBignets.com

Atlantic Broadband. Currently offering 15/60/120 megabits download speeds in Kent County at prices ranging up to $80.99/month for internet services only. The company also offers internet, cable TV, and phone packages. David Isenberg, a Boston-based executive, says the company intends to be competitive, is upgrading their system on the Eastern Shore, and plans eventually to offer gigabit service in Maryland. They recently provided fiber to the home in the Kinards Point, Worton, neighborhood and expect to do that in most new buildouts. www.atlanticbb.com

Wireless

Bridgemaxx. Offering 2/3/6/10 megabits download speeds at prices from $34.95 to $84.95, with installation extra. CEO Jim Conner says that they can provide up to 30 megabits, and that they can also provide phone service, and video service via their partner Direct TV. Bridgemaxx has been active on the Eastern Shore for several years and already has numerous customers. www.bridgemaxx.com

Delmarva WiFi. Offering 5/10/25 megabits download and upload speeds at prices from $64.96 to $109.95/month. Install and customer equipment extra. CEO John Woodfield says that with newer equipment, they can provide speeds up to 100 megabits to line of sight customers. Delmarva has also been active across the Eastern Shore for several years. www.delmarvawifi.com

Cambio WiFi. Offering 8/12/16/25 megabits download speeds at prices ranging from $54.95 to $124.95. Install extra. CEO Steve Kirby says that they can provide speeds as high as 100 megabits. Cambio provides service over its own licensed frequencies to minimize interference. Cambio is a relatively new entrant on the Eastern Shore, launching in Kent County (although they have been serving Tolchester Marina and other customers since 2015), but intends to expand across the Eastern Shore and beyond.  www.cambiowifi.com

Tidewater WiFi. Offering 25 megabits of download for $75/month, with higher levels of usage at prices up to $120/month, activation fee extra. Offers service primarily in the Galena area. www.tidewaterwifi.com

A Technology Primer

Like most things digital, the technologies that bring internet to your home keep getting faster, better, and cheaper. Take optical fibers, for example, which can now carry an internet signal (in the form of light) 20 miles or more before it needs to be boosted or amplified. Installing such fibers (which come wrapped in heavy insulation) is easier now too, with trenching tools or with guided horizontal drills that punch a cable-sized hole 400 feet long (and 4 to 8 feet underground), then pull a bundle of optical fibers through the hole as the drill withdraws. The cable crews installing fiber in Kent County (see pics/video) say they can typically lay 800 feet of fiber per day, sometimes more.

When a fiber reaches your home, it is connected to a device called an optical network terminal, which converts it into a WiFi signal and also provide Ethernet jacks, like a conventional router. Routers, too, have improved; many today offer WiFi networks on two different frequencies to give homeowners more ways to connect their devices. And there are more devices to connect—not only mobile phones, tablets, and computers, but also TVs, electronic gaming terminals, music systems, thermostats, security systems, and other “smart home” tools. Two frequencies allow people to segregate devices that carry sensitive information—like computers used for on-line banking or professional activities—from those that are wide open (your smart thermostat, your children’s Facebook or Snapchat links).

When a wireless internet signal reaches your home, it also is typically captured by an external antenna that connects to a WiFi router in your home. But wireless technology has also improved; some providers (including some in Kent County) now use what is called WiFi over LTE, which is a form of wireless transmission that is used by mobile telecom companies on their licensed frequencies, but can now also be used in the unlicensed WiFi frequencies. WiFi over LTE is said to resist interference better and offer improved penetration through trees, which means better access and higher effective speeds.

Al Hammond holds degrees in Engineering and Applied Mathematics from Stanford University and Harvard University. He is a serial entrepreneur (having founded 5 enterprises) and a prolific writer (having authored or contributed to 16 books and nearly 200 articles). In the 1970s, he helped to edit the international journal Science, and went on to found and edit several national publications, including Science 80/86 (published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science) and Issues in Science and Technology (published by the National Academy of Science). He lives in Chestertown, Maryland and Washington, D.C.

Spy Eye: An Outdoor Campus Opens at the Middle School

Share

Kent County Middle School unveiled its new outdoor campus today in a brief ceremony. The new facilities include tennis, basketball and wallboard courts, a 1/3 mile paved walking track, exercise stations, sports’ fields and landscaping. New fencing (meeting ADA standards) encloses the area, and additionally, provides easy access to the community. Project costs exceeded $250,000, which was funded via grants through Maryland DNR ($230,000), the Town of Chestertown, Kent County Commissioners, and Kent County Public Schools. Chestertown Rotary Club arranged for the placement of seven granite benches at the exercise stations around the path.

Officiating at the ceremony were Janice Steffy, KCMS Principal, Dr. Karen Couch, KCPS Superintendent, Chestertown Mayor Chris Cerino and Carrie Lhostky, representing DNR Community Parks & Playgrounds. KCMS students Deondre Blake (8th) and Thomas Goldsborough (7th) spoke of their appreciation and intended use of the improvements. Mayor Cerino stood among a large group of KCMS students in cutting the ribbon.

_jlw8989-2

Janice Steffy, KCMS Principal

_jlw8990-3

Dr Karen Couch, KCPS Superintendent

_jlw8994-5

Mayor Chris Cerino

_jlw8996-7

Thomas Goldsborough (7th grade)

_jlw8995-6

Deondre Blake (8th grade)

_jlw8985-1 _jlw8992-4   _jlw9001-9

 

Revenge on the Chestnut by Bobbie Brittingham

Share

The word revenge might be a little too strong for this situation, but it really felt good to say it. There are several different kind of chestnuts. The color of a horse for one. I had a beautiful big 17 hand horse named Shannon when I was a young woman many years ago, but I still can see how bright his coat shinned after giving him a bath as he stood in the sun. He had a lovely bright chestnut color. I loved it. Horses also have a small hard scaly growth on their legs called a chestnut. There is the chestnut wood used in fine furniture, and it has beautiful rich grain to it. A woman with chestnut color hair as Maureen O’Hara had, to be envied by many. THEN there is the chestnut tree. A tree that produces sought after edible nuts. More about them later. I want to inform you about the beauty of this tree. It is rather a medium to fast growing deciduous tree that can eventually reach 75 to 100 feet. In the early 20th century, a fungal blight carried by a hitch hiker almost wiped out the American Chestnut. They are breeding them now in hopes that they can create a tree that will be resistant to this deadly blight. Large oval serrated leaves that cover wide sweeping arching branches. The bark has an interesting rough grey-brown bark. The spring brings forth a beautiful white cascading candle-like blossom, and it has a slight sweet fragrance. They were so prominent on the Appalachian Mountain tops that when they were in bloom it was said to look like snow on the tops of the mountains. These blossoms drop and will create drifts that can clog the gutters.

Close up ChestnutThe architectural branches add great interest to the winter landscape too. They are a very lovely tree with many attributes, but they do have a major major (that is a double major) drawback. Word of caution, my language and tone might change as I reveal the very despicable side of this tree. In the fall these stately trees drop a round, hard, thorny, sharply, bristly, prickly, spiky, covered ball. They are treacherous to step on and it will go thru a flip – flop. Yes, I really do know about this from firsthand experience. The tree should never, ever, be planted near any path, door or opening within 100 yards of where inhabitants or cohabitants are living. Mine is !!!!! Located on the drive side of the house, right where anyone who gets out of a car steps on them, and I walk almost daily. This is my real reason for the extreme disdain I have for this particular chestnut tree.

But the chestnut does have a little secret inside these tennis size monstrous balls. There is a sweet delicious buttery nut. This is the first year I took the challenge, or rather an attempt at doing something with them. After all, I had to find a way to wage revenge on the tree. I really didn’t want to cut it down since I love my trees and have planted over 87 trees in three years on a few acres. This seemed like a reasonable excuse to salvage some decent kind of reward from the continuous raking and cleaning up these nasty —- spiny, prickly things that the devil grew. The little nut inside will luckily loosen from the surrounding barricade and to descend with a thud to the ground. The only thing is that between the squirrels and me was an hourly dash to grab Chestnut treewhat we could before the other did. I had collected a nice bag of these exquisite chestnuts and decided this would be my revenge. These are the nuts that romantic, holiday songs have been written, and people pay dearly for from a street vendor. They are of culinary fame from soup to, well, nuts is one word, but I will say just deserts. So I looked up on Goggle how to roast these prized gems. I bought a special roasting pan and a special tool for cutting the ends in a cross pattern. I invested all of only $68.00 at Amazon. This proves they really do have everything.

I invited a friend over to enter into this process with me. I was making sure that if I were poisoned from this experiment, someone could tell my children how brave I was. I followed the directions from Miss Martha (you know THE one) and opened a bottle of white wine to help with digestion. The special frying pan was scattered with about fifteen prepared nuts. I turned the gas on to medium and stood back in admiration of this fulfilling moment. Soon the cross started to peel away from the inside treasure. All was waiting for REVENGE. Some butter was melted, and some salt was ground and then the moment of complete ecstatic REVENGE !!!! YES– YES– YES. Almost as good as When Harry Met Sally.

Now you can make up your own mind about whether you want a Chestnut tree . If I had my choice, I would never plant one close to the house. I would certainly plant one just far enough out of the way so that it does not cause undo pain, but still close enough that I can race the squirrels.

A Pear Tree and Pansies by Bobbie Brittingham

Share

I know that you all have had this question asked before as I have and I have tried to think of a different answer to it but for some reason I always end up back at the same time in my childhood with the answer. What and when is your first memory of gardening?

I have lived in this area of the Eastern Shore almost my entire life. A few exceptions, going away to boarding school and college, and two years in Elizabeth City, North Carolina when I was first married. Then I returned back to the Shore after those two years. So I have seen many changes and have many memories of my life in the garden. And I do say life sincerely.

I was very fortunate to have had a mother who loved gardening and was a rabid propagator. She could start anything from seed, bulbs or by cuttings. Even collecting camellia seeds to cool in the refrigerator for a year or two and then germinating them, raising them with constant care until they were large enough to go into her shade garden that she had created out of an empty corn field. Now in someone else’s care, they are 20 to 30 feet, producing a spring display that could rival any North Carolina garden. Unfortunately, she is not here to see them.

photo (1)I was close to maybe seven or eight years old when I would go with her in the early spring to a couple of home-built cold frames under a huge twisted, eerie old pear tree. She would slide the heavy glass paneled tops over the back side of the frames to reveal hundreds of bright, cheerful, happy faced pansies.

Now these were the real pansies, each with a distinctive face and personality. Not like the meager, sullen ones on today’s market benches. We would situate ourselves so that I was to her left and she was in front of the frames. With her precious trowel worn down to a sharp blade, she would carefully dig each blooming pansy out cradled in a square block of dirt. Then she would hand it carefully to me to wrap in newspaper, in a special way so that the ends could be tucked into secure each plant. I would be so diligent and conscientious about my job. I wanted it to be exactly right because Mother would check them all over to be sure I did it right, and I had an arterial motive…..

In Easton many years ago, there was a small grocery store on Harrison Street across from the Tidewater Inn. It was Johnny’s Grocery Store. At least that is the name I recall. It was a real old fashion store that you left your list with clerk, and they would fill the order for pick up later. Well, Johnny would pay me 10 cents for every pansy plant I brought in.

Now I did not get rich with this project but since my mother had done all the work of preparing the cold frames, seeding the pansies, weeding, watering keeping them cozy and all I had to do was sit and wrap them in newspaper, I thought this was a fair price.

My piggy bank never really overflowed but I enjoyed that special one on one time that my mother as we sat under that old pear tree wrapping pansies and just talking about anything and everything a young mind might come up with. To this day every time I smell that delightfully fresh pansy perfume I remember the pear tree and my mother’s worn trowel handing me a precious pansy.

×
×
We're glad you're enjoying The Chestertown Spy.

Sign up for the the free email blast to see what's new in the Spy. It's delivered right to your inbox at 3PM sharp.

Sign up here.