House of the Week:  Multi-Level Marvelous

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It was a  pleasure to find this property that has all four features I seek in a House of the Week: site, architecture, interiors and landscape.  The 1.3 acre site has many pastoral vistas including a view of the pond beyond a tall willow tree and flowering shrubbery, the view of the Chester River framed by mature trees, a hardscaped terrace with an umbrella table for al-fresco dining with colorful beds of flowers and the view of the farm property across the road that is protected from development. The house’s exterior massing breaks up the linear plan with an upper level containing the bedrooms and baths and the lower level below the bedroom wing containing laundry and storage. The main level contains the entrance hall, living, library, kitchen, dining and screened porch. The surrounding green of the landscape is the perfect backdrop for the warm blue color of the exterior siding and crisp white trim. 

I loved the interiors of all the rooms with their Scandinavian accents.  The spacious entrance hall with its wooden floor, antique wooden table, framed art reflected in the mirror on the opposite wall and the vista toward the living room is a gracious introduction to the interiors.  I loved the living room with the rear wall anchored by the fireplace flanked by bay windows with views of the landscape. Millwork “bookends” were on opposite ends of the room. The colors in the art above the fireplace inspired the color scheme for the mantel accent pieces and the entire room.  A comfortable blue chair under one wall of books is the perfect spot for reading by the bay window. Both the beautiful wood slat-back settee and the upholstered loveseat have neutral cushions accented by colorful pillows. A small round table surrounded by wood chairs painted lime green finishes this simple but sophisticated look.

The focal point of the dining room is the stunning large round inlaid wood antique table with wood chairs and the hutch between the front windows displays serving pieces. The pale salmon wall color is broken by a white chair rail and double wood doors that lead to the living room. The dining room is separated from the kitchen by a half height wall and a French door on the other side wall leads to the screened porch. The corner location of the screened porch has expansive vistas of the farm across the road and the river.

Being a bibliophile, my favorite room is the library at the rear corner of the house. Daylight comes from the two exterior walls and the windows in the front wall to the screened porch. The rear wall is a window wall of French doors and sidelights against an accent wall of light pumpkin. The side wall is lined with full-height bookshelves punctuated with windows on either side of the fireplace and a TV is discreetly tucked into the millwork. Colorful accent pillows against the blue upholstered loveseats and an artisan coffee table form a cozy seating area in front of the fireplace. 

The hallway that leads to the upper level bedrooms ends in a vista of an antique chest on top of an Oriental runner with a lamp and circular mirror above.  Each bedroom has “bird’s eye” views of the serene landscape. I especially liked one bedroom since it reminded me of my own bedroom with the white coverlet, the mix of solid and patterned pillows, the translucent lampshades by the bed and the dark patterned rug.    

Wonderful site enhanced by landscaping, a house in harmony with its setting, beautifully designed interiors inspired by Scandinavian design principles of clean lines, functionality and simplicity- utterly charming!

For more information about this property, contact Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate Company agent Richard Budden at 410-778-0330 (o), 443-480-1181 (c) or rbudden@easternshoremdre.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

House of the Week: Chesapeake Bay Bliss

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After a drive down a private lane with vistas through tall evergreen and deciduous trees, colorful redbuds and lower plantings, you arrive at a clearing where the drive circles around the corner of the “L” shaped house surrounding a swimming pool facing the Bay. The massing of the house steps down from the two-story wing to a one story wing to the pool.  The corner of the “L” is the entrance hall with Mexican tile flooring and arched openings that lead either to the wide stairs to the upper level family room or to the other wing that contains a guest suite and the spacious master suite beyond. 

From the entry, a short hall leads to the wing containing the kitchen/dining area and another guest suite. The kitchen has my favorite “L” and island arrangement and I liked the openness of shelves instead of upper cabinets, the white base cabinets with a contrasting island color and stainless steel appliances.  Opposite the kitchen is a large screened porch along the length of this wing of the house for easy access from the kitchen and dining area and direct access to the pool area. Skylights strategically placed in the long roof area bring daylight into the screened porch. The dining area has a bay window and a fireplace and built-in cabinetry along the stair wall for storage.  

The spacious ground floor master suite with wood floors has daylight from two pairs of double windows flanking the bed and two pairs of French doors that lead to a sitting room. This corner room has views to the landscape and the Bay from wrap-around windows. French doors that lead to the lawn and garden areas.

The stunning family room encompasses the entire second floor. Large windows on three sides of the room and a wrap-around deck offer panoramic views of the landscape and the Bay. One focused vista of the bay is framed by tall trees and beds of daffodils in the spring.  The pitched ceiling with exposed collar beams, the seating area around the fireplace, the dining area and wet bar all combine to create a great space for relaxing with family and friends. 

The wood floors, light colored walls and white trim throughout the house is a very pleasing interior color palette.  The “coastal” plan with the great room on the second floor, the ground floor bedrooms and the kitchen/dining areas with direct access to the large pool  works very well. Access to the beach along the Bay is a very pleasant stroll between tall trees and flower beds in the spring. All this and sunset views of the endless Bay horizon – a blissful retreat!

 For more information about this property contact  Lynn Hilfiker with Gunther McClary Real Estate at 410-639-2118 (o), 443-480-1163 (c)  or lynnhilfiker@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Historic Charm with Modern Updates 

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The setting of this house, built in 1900, with its blend of the best details of the Victorian and Queen Anne styles caught my eye. The house’s massing with hipped roofs broken by gables and dormers, the wrap-around front porch with fretwork, and the bay wings is very pleasing.  The color palette of white siding with accents including the third floor gable with a contrasting peach color siding, the blue accents of porch columns, fretwork and window shutters and the exposed foundation of red brick with white lattice infill are picture perfect. Several large trees shade the house and the low hedge that borders the porch with accents of plantings amid the lawn areas creates a lovely setting for this charming historic house.

The bay window that protrudes into the front porch creates several seating areas for relaxing. Two white rocking chairs in the nook next to the front door and a row of white Adirondack chairs facing the street are great spots for enjoying a summer evening’s breeze and catching up with neighbors passing by. The front door with its transom and sidelights next to an accent window of stained glass opens onto a spacious entrance hall’s “L” shaped stair with the original balustrade and panels below that have been carefully preserved.  

I love bay windows for the extra light they bring into a room and both the living and dining rooms had bay windows. The original wood fireplace in the living room with its inlaid mirror and shelf for display of collectibles is the focal point of the room and the front windows, side bay window and beautiful hardwood floor add more charm. The bay window in the dining room is a cozy spot for cocktails before dinner and the large Oriental rug, the Queen Anne antique table and chairs and the hutch filled with china evokes dinner parties from another era.

The smooth flow from the “formal” rooms to the kitchen, family room and sunroom makes this a great house for entertaining.  A wide wall opening between the breakfast area in the large kitchen and the sunroom at the rear of the house connects these spaces and the family room next to the breakfast area completes the informal areas.  In the heat of the summer, a dip in the pool in the rear yard would be hard to resist.  

The second floor contains the bedrooms and the third floor attic could be a quiet studio for an artist or writer.  Great historic charm that has been carefully preserved and all the modern conveniences you need to make this house your home.

For more information about this property, contact Jody Baker with Cross Street Realtors at 410-778-3779 (o),410-708-3536  (c) or jody@csrealtors.com.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Craftsman Gem

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This house was built in 2015 but its style evokes the craftsman bungalows of the 1930’s with its compact massing, materials,  textures and architectural details. The “L’ shaped footprint has a wrap-around porch at the side that is recessed from the main façade and is covered by a metal roof with tapered wood columns on stone bases. The porch leads to a deck at the water side and one bay of the porch leads to the front door with sidelights and another window. The front wall of the house is a mix of stone at the first floor with a triple window and board and batten siding around  the double window at the second floor. The garage is at a right angle to the house and its architecture is as beautifully articulated as the house. The pitched roof has a shed dormer above the craftsman garage doors. On the other side, the roof extends to become a shed roof projection with a stone base and board and batten siding above. The gable end wall with a single window set into board and batten siding above a shed bay projection clad in stone with a triple window completes the striking composition.  

The front door opens onto an entrance hall that steps down to the great room with living, dining and kitchen areas.  The “L” shaped stair is opposite the wall of windows that bathe the great room with sunlight on three sides. The fireplace on one side wall is flanked by pairs of double windows and at the rear four single windows are ganged together for views to the water.  The dining area has a bay shape that extends to the floor at the rear and a side triple window unit with a French door to the deck. The galley kitchen with a long island and bar stools defines the kitchen area. The lower level has a family room with dining space and another kitchen to bring the indoor entertaining area closer to the terrace, dock and water.  

I loved the master bedroom with its rear bay window and side triple windows for water views. I coveted the free-standing tub in the master bath underneath four windows ganged together for contemplating nature while enjoying a slow relaxing soak after a day on the water.

This prominent home site is surrounded by water. Outdoor rooms from the porch, deck, covered terrace at the lower level, the terrace with its  semi-circle of Adirondack chairs surrounding the firepit and the sandy beach all beckon the nature lover

 

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For more information about this property, contact John Burke with Gunther McClary Real Estate at 410-275-2118 (o), 443-206-3727 (c) or jburke57@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Habitat:  The Work of Architect William Draper Brinckloe

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I have a particular fondness for the “Period” style of American architecture from the early twentieth century. Partly as a reaction to the previous elaborate Victorian style, these Period homes were compact, with space plans defined by separate rooms according to function. Designs were inspired by English Tudor, Colonial Revival, French Colonial, Spanish Colonial, Bungalow and Craftsman styles. Two of my favorite Period houses in Easton’s Historic District are a bungalow on Washington Street and a Dutch colonial on S. Harrison Street.  After some research, I discovered they were designed by the same architect, William Draper Brinckloe, who lived to Easton from 1911 until his death in 1933. He was also an author of two books, “The Small Home” and “The Volunteer Firemen”. In his book “The Small Home” he mentions that he is designing a small bungalow for his family which became known as the “Dutch Cottage” on Harrison Street.

“A Small Home” is out of print but through the Easton Library’s loan program, I obtained a copy that was invaluable to me in my research. Brinckloe discusses sixteen categories of planning and building a house and includes plans and perspectives of sixty of his charming designs. I chuckled when I saw rooms on several plans named “sewing room” as my sewing skills are limited to sewing buttons or fixing hems!  As a veteran of many home makeovers, his chapter on “Making Over the Old Home” had a simple rule “Do as little tearing out as possible; remodel by building on new work, rather than by changing old” and my architectural practice has endeavored to adhere to that rule. I then wryly read his comment that he “…specialized on remodeling to some extent; and I have probably done more of it than my brother architects”. Little did he know that today all but one of Easton’s architectural firms have women principals.

åBrinckloe also designed several commercial projects, including renovations to the landmark Stewart Building that the Prager Group has updated to become the Jewel in the Crown of Federal Street. Brinckloe’s design for the brick building near the corner of Dover and Aurora Streets is simply delightful.  Red brick with accents of white banding between the lower floor windows and the arched transoms, the recessed archway that is an open vestibule to the French entry door beyond, three single windows that step up in tune to the stairway and two pairs of four window units create a lively façade. I especially liked how the white lintel band created a small open transom for the vestibule beyond. The wall above the stairwell rises above the parapet and is crowned with an arched top that steps down to the adjacent roof.  The second floor windows are covered by a deep shingled roof overhang and enhanced by window boxes below.

In addition to Brinckloe’s designs for the Washington and Harrison Street residences, Aurora Street has a row of his Period designs across from Idlewild Park.  When I was active in real estate, I showed the irresistible red brick bungalow with a tile roof. The roofline flares at the front elevation and a wide shed dormer creates space for a second floor.  I loved the symmetry of the front elevation with two pairs of shed roof dormer windows that were centered over the front door below and the end windows that were centered over the wide bay windows below that are tucked under the wide soffit.  The exquisite one-story semicircular bay wing on the right of the house is surrounded by continuous windows for sunlight and views of the park.`

The other Aurora Street bungalows are equally charming with their brick facades and the variety of roof styles that create a delightful streetscape. One house has a hipped roof with two dormer windows and a front porch gable flanked by two pairs of windows.  The center and each end of the elliptical window headers are accented in white to match the façade’s white quoins. Another house has lighter brick with white quoins and two shed dormers in its tile roof. The third house has a gambrel roof, double window dormers above an asymmetrical façade of a triple window bay with quoins, front door and double window. The fourth house is a lovely elongated façade of light brick with white quoins, the entry porch at one side, a wide shed dormer that meets the front wall of the main floor below and a single window wing at the end.

I was very fortunate to have tours of both the Washington Street bungalow and the Harrison Street “Dutch Cottage” that Brinckloe once called home. The Washington Street bungalow is the last illustration of his book. Brinckloe wrote that “the living room is particularly attractive with its curved ingle-nook bordered by bookshelves” and it has remained so. I absolutely love the front elevation with its gable front, deep eave broken by an “eyebrow” to mark the front door, the deep wrap-around porch with its wide, flared columns, the hipped roof wing next to the gable with a triple window-a perfect example of proportion and style that has been lovingly maintained by its current owners.  

Brinckloe’s “Dutch Cottage” residence is set back and angled from the street for privacy. A weathered wood fence along the street frontage is broken by a curved brick path that leads to a gate in the fence. After a short walk through the landscape you cross over a bridge where a stream once bisected the property. You arrive at the two-story gambrel roofed cottage that is sited parallel to the dry stream bed for maximum privacy from the street. The exterior walls are painted dark gray that disappear into the landscape and the crisp white multipaned windows, trim and pale brown shutters are appealing accents.  The front door opens to a view of the stairs that split at the landing in two directions. The dining room has a fireplace with a surround of Delft tiles and an arched niche above for family photographs. One bedroom is tucked under the eaves with a triple window dormer for sunlight.

Brinckloe’s home will be featured in the first Fall Spy House Tour of Homes on Sunday October 6th.  Homes will be designed by architects and interior designers  in a celebration of Talbot County’s great architectural heritage, past and present. Stay tuned to the Spy for more information.

Many thanks to the owners of the Washington Street and S. Harrison Street residences who graciously welcomed me into their homes and shared their photographs.

I am indebted to my friend, the artist Carol Minarick, for leading me to the work of this gifted architect of an earlier generation.  I am also grateful to the architect Charles Goebel for his help during my research.

Exterior Photography by Ted Mueller, tedmuellerphotography@gmail.com, 443-955-2490

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Granny Branch Farm

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This Maryland Historical Trust property, circa 1735, is listed as the “James Marshall Farm” but the property address on Granny Branch Road Farm inspired its current owners to rename their picturesque country property. One of the owners, a talented interior designer, told me it was “love at first site” when she and her husband first drove up the gravel driveway.  Five outbuildings, including original creameries and a 19th century smokehouse are interspersed throughout the three acre property.  At the entrance to the driveway is a basswood tree whose six foot girth would set its age as approximately 200 years.  A lone majestic Dutch Elm, the only survivor of many others that formed a graceful line along the gravel drive, is behind the house. Across from the driveway entrance is an ancient statuesque holly that offers shelter for cardinals and red winged blackbirds, along with winter color. It is impossible to miss the native 100 foot tall Bald Cypress tree in its prime position on the front yard with its 30 foot limb spread providing shade in the summer months. The vistas throughout the beautifully landscaped grounds with its springtime bursts of color including iris, peonies, hydrangeas and lilies would inspire any Plein Air painter.  Being a native Tennessean, I especially love the blue bearded Iris bed and the ivy colored small shed beyond a bed of larkspur is picture perfect.

The original two and a half story Flemish bond brick structure is faced with a water table encircling all sides of the main wing. The south-facing front porch is now a four-seasons room with lap siding. The frame addition with cedar shake siding, dating from 1880, adds another layer of texture and color to the massing.  On the day I visited, after savoring the exquisite landscape, I eagerly looked forward to touring the interiors since they were the work of one of the owners, the talented interior designer Jane Keller.

We began our tour in the kitchen, with its galley layout and large kitchen island, the perfect spot for one of her husband’s Scandinavian smorgasbords. Exposed wood collar beams, original wood floors, granite counters and stainless steel appliances, comfortable upholstered seating by the wood stove and barstools for keeping the cook company creates an inviting space. A gallery hall leads to the entrance hall with its original wood stair balustrade and a unique Gothic arched wood wainscot.  The front door leads to the four-seasons sunroom with pairs of large windows on three sides to bathe the room in sunlight throughout the day. Both the dining room and living room are enhanced by their original and reconditioned fireplaces and beautifully restored wood floors. The neutral upholstered pieces are accented by Jane’s bold splashes of accent wall colors, art and Oriental rugs.

The entire second floor of the brick main wing is the master suite. I loved the master bedroom as much as I did the sunroom.  A beautiful patterned rug in shades of blue, crisp white bed linens with colorful pillows, antiques and art created a serene space.  The master bath clawfoot tub with shower fitting with the antique chest lavatory and the high wood glossy white wainscot against the darker wall color above creates a sophisticated look for the bath.  On the third floor are two guest bedrooms and above the kitchen wing is a space currently used as an office.

Throughout the house all of the original details including the hardwood floors, Eastlake doors with period hardware, wood trim, moldings, etc., have been preserved with care and pride of place. “Trunnels” (tapered wood nails) were found in the Granary along with a plaque signed in 1835 by the builders and carpenters the day the house was finished: “This building was finished 12 cck July 16th, 1845 JW Hamington & Joel Pippin Builders. Charles McCollister & Rich a G. Duckett present”.

This exquisite property has everything a historic preservationist would treasure-a beautiful site with very old trees, pastoral vistas through lawns and planting beds, a house whose original wing dates from Colonial days, restoration and  renovation executed with care and skill under the watchful and discriminating eye of a gifted interior designer. If you are seeking old world charm and modern upgrades, it would be hard to resist this house and its grounds.

 

For more information about this property, contact Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate Company agent Richard Budden at 410-778-0330 (o), 443-480-1181 (c) or rbudden@easternshoremdre.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity/” Interior design by Jane Keller, 443-994-2934

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week:  Serenity on the Sassafras

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This house has great curb appeal with its traditional architectural style, mixture of textures and colors of multi-colored stone, light colored stucco and deep red shutters set against a green backdrop of mature trees. From the entry drive the house appears to be a story and  half with roof dormers but the rear elevation opens up to the Sassafras River below with large areas of windows and French doors. The “L” shaped massing of the plan has a main wing with smaller wings on each side with the garage at a right angle to the house so the garage doors are less noticeable from the street. A terrace at the rear of the house is paved with irregularly shaped stone pavers and spans across the master suite, living and dining rooms at the rear of the house.

The vista from the front door is first of the spacious entrance hall with the  “L” shaped stair that is open to the second floor. On the opposite side of the entrance hall is the formal dining room sized for large gatherings of family and friends. The vista continues through the living room with its rear wall of three pairs of French doors with transoms to the landscape and the water views beyond.  The adjacent informal dining area is between the living room and the family room to create a large open plan with sunlight from the large windows and transoms at the rear of the house. The kitchen is open to the dining area and its white cabinets, light countertops, stainless steel appliances and wood floors maintains the feeling of openness. Another French door from the dining area leads to the terrace. A pergola over the master bedroom terrace area creates a shady outdoor room.

I loved the master bedroom with its blue and white interior design scheme. The light blue carpet, valance and drapes in a small blue and white floral print, the wood pencil post bed with crisp white linens is a restful retreat. The second floor bedrooms are located at the rear of the house for water views and one bedroom has a window seat under triple windows.

The house is zoned very well with the garage leading to the breezeway and laundry room to the kitchen, the living and dining areas grouped along the rear wall of windows, the master suite on the main floor and guest rooms above.  There is also a large basement for myriad uses.

 

For more information about this property, contact Ashton Kelley with Gunther McClary Real Estate at 410-275-2118 (o), 410-708-8144(c) or akelleyre@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Photography by Steve Buchanan Photography, 410-212-8753, 310-996-7295, steve@buchananphotography.com, www.buchananphotography.com.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Craftsman Perfect Ten

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My favorite houses that I have called home were craftsman cottages so I was immediately captivated by this charming cottage. I loved the lushly landscaped setting, the terrific mix of texture and materials with light colored river rock porch railing and chimney with the green lap siding and the door and window accents in deep red. The side of the house, however, with its atypical window arrangement hinted of a more contemporary interior.

The front door opened to a vista of a majestic Oriental wood chair with a colorful woven pillow. A pair of French doors with frosted glass led to a truly “great” room containing the kitchen, dining and living room areas. The ceiling plane stepped up from the galley kitchen to soar to the roof above the two-story living room. A large sectional and an Oriental rug anchored the space and the rear wall full of windows and the high windows on the side wall flooded the space with light. The stairs wrapped around the full height fireplace chimney for another dramatic vista.

An open front storage unit serves double duty to define the dining area and is topped with reading lamps for the sofa. The up-mount translucent blinds gives seated privacy below and views above to the landscape. A deck spans the length of the rear elevation and stairs lead to the side driveway.

The master bedroom white palette with warm hardwood floors contrasts with the periwinkle blue palette of the second bedroom that is currently used as an office.  The walk-out basement is a blank canvas that could become another bedroom suite or recreation room with French doors to the rear garden.

The front access to the garden is via a gate marked by a trellis above in the fence between the house and the edge of the gravel driveway.  Large stones mark the meandering path through the lush garden with a center lawn area surrounded by planting beds, canopy trees and mature trees.

Great curb appeal, stunning interior architecture and an in-town verdant oasis- what more would one need?

For more information about this property, contact Sarah Dean with Cross Street Realtors at 410-778-3779 (o),410-708-2528  (c) or sarah@csrealtors.com.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Colonial Elegance

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The tranquil setting of this two and a half storied stately Colonial caught my eye. The house’s slate roof, cream colored stucco and red brick foundation set against the green of the lawn and plantings was very appealing. After opening the gate in the black iron fence along historic Water Street, you walk up a brick sidewalk to the entry door at the side elevation. The door and sidelights are beautifully detailed with an elliptical transom and half-glass sidelights of leaded glass. I loved the entrance hall with its checkerboard flooring pattern of white and black marble, the vertical patterned wallpaper with a paneled wainscot and the graceful stairs with a wide landing to allow the lower run to curve around to the upper run of steps. The entrance hall spans the full depth of the house so the vista from the front door is to the landscaped rear yard.

To the left of the entrance hall is the living room and sunroom.  The Chippendale style fireplace mantel is the focal point of the living room with Wedgewood blue walls with white moldings and chair rail. To the right of the entrance hall is the dining room that also has Wedgewood blue walls but the panel in the wainscot is outlined in white.  A contemporary glass table allows the beauty of the Oriental rug to be fully appreciated and French doors lead to a screened porch.

The kitchen and bar pantry at the rear of the house continue the black and white theme.  The bar flooring has small white tiles with black chamfered corners that is perfectly scaled to this cozy space. The white cabinets with period hardware and  glass fronted upper cabinets open up the space. The kitchen is a cook’s dream-it also has white cabinets with black countertops and larger tile flooring, stainless steel appliances and a gray tiled backsplash.  French doors lead to the rear covered brick terrace. Steps from both the covered terrace and the screened porch lead to the spacious rear yard that is ready for a game of croquet!

The stair landing at the second floor is a charming reading nook. The center window’s valance picks up the colors of the mural on one wall opposite an antique armoire.  Full height bookcases flank the window and an oversize rattan chair and ottoman would be a cozy space for reading. Another charming room on the second floor is a bedroom that is currently decorated as a sitting room. This corner room has windows overlooking the rear landscaping and the side yard for added daylight. The third floor has additional bedrooms and a bath.  

Classic American Colonial with a blend of the old and new, gracious entrance hall, great flow on the main floor for entertaining, wonderful and private outdoor spaces, a large rear yard  surrounded by a wooden fence-if you are seeking a historic house on one of Chestertown’s best streets, this one’s for you!

For more information about this property, contact  Peter Heller with Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate Company at 410-778-0330 (o), 410-708-3301 (c) or pheller@cbchesapeake.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

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