Spy House of the Week: “Pretty in Pink”

Share

There are so many architectural styles that I admire but it is always difficult for me to resist the Queen Anne American style for its sheer exuberance. The elements of this style are all here in this house- the asymmetry, dominant front two-story gable projection, side secondary two-story gable projection, square tower with its hipped roof, wrap-around porch with articulated columns and fretwork, eave brackets, lap siding with fish-scale siding on the third floor, bay windows, accent attic windows, stained glass and diamond patterned muntins-this “Pink Lady” stands tall and is dressed in her Sunday best!

The front door opens onto a deep two-story entrance hall with beautiful herringbone patterned wood flooring. The triple run “U” shaped staircase with stained carved newel posts and railing cap with white balusters wraps around the side and rear wall. The side double window and arched transom with top and bottom diamond patterned muntins infilled with stained glass filters light within. The rear double window at the landing with full diamond patterned muntins and clear glass brings in direct sunlight.

The bay-windowed rooms on the first floor are parlors whose interiors designate their different functions. The front parlor has a seating grouping around the fireplace and a Queen Anne style writing desk at the bay window. The rear parlor with its paneled wainscot has a seating grouping around the TV and leads to the “U” shaped kitchen with a peninsula bar. The kitchen is open to the dining area with its trio of double windows along the side and another double window at the rear for views to the back yard. The glassed-in porch off the dining area has direct access to the rear terrace with seating and dining areas. The high fence between the house and the storage shed gives seated privacy for enjoying meals outdoors.

I loved how the stair landings were enlarged to create seating areas under the decorative windows. At the second floor a wide window with narrower sidelights and diamond muntins on the top light and a picture window below would be a cozy space for reading to a child or grandchild before bedtime or a sitting area for the bedrooms to share. The third floor landing at the top of the stair tower has a beautifully detailed window trio with an arched top center unit infilled with diamond muntin segments over a picture pane below. Shorter sidelights with full diamond muntins complete the design and the sofa below would be a quiet spot for an afternoon nap.

Two of the bedrooms on the second floor have one bay-windowed wall for great interior architecture and the third floor with its pitched ceiling that follows the gable roof above and dormer windows is a great space for myriad uses limited only by one’s imagination. This “Pink Lady” has irresistible appeal with its distinctive architecture and numerous period details inside and outside.  It is updated and ready for a new owner to fully appreciate this gem.

 

For more information about this property, contact Retha Arbital with Doug Ashley Realtors at 410-810-0010 (o), 410-708-2172 (c) or rarrabal@hotmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Decked Out Coastal Design

Share

Now that my daffodils and Lenten roses are beginning to awaken from their winter slumber, I can finally anticipate being outdoors. This coastal design with its lovely color palette of yellow lap siding, white trim and light gray metal roof offers multiple opportunities for being outdoors with its main floor wrap-around deck, the brick terrace off the sunroom and the upper deck. For shade there is a porch at the front door and the upper deck creates another porch for part of the main floor deck. The guest house also has a front porch. The massing combination of the main two-story house’s telescoping down to a one-story addition at the rear and the front gable that projects from the house was very appealing. I was especially drawn to the twilight photograph that showed how most of the elevation that faces the water is primarily glass-many windows, skylights  and sliding doors bring light into the interiors.

The ground floor of the main house is zoned very well with two bedrooms and two baths on one side. On the other side, the “U” shaped kitchen connects  the dining and family rooms. Behind the family room is a sunroom for a clear vista from front to back. The sunroom with its deep yellow wall color, hardwood floors, wrap-around windows and space for both a seating area and another dining area make this a delightful space.  The wall between the sunroom and the family room is almost transparent with its pair of sliding doors and full-height windows at each side. The master bedroom with its pitched ceiling, sage green walls, hardwood floors with Oriental rugs, warm wood armoire and chest of drawers creates a serene retreat.

Since space planning is my forte, I especially liked the layout of the second floor.  The front corner is a second master suite with its own deck facing the water. The rest of the floor is open and the offset architecture creates interesting vistas from the main sitting room with a mini-bar and the cozy sitting area at the top of the stairs with an alcove for an office area. Windows on all three sides of this spacious  sitting room make this a sunny space. The side walls of the house has high windows facing the neighboring houses for privacy and longer windows or sliding doors for views at the front and rear.

The guest house has a sitting room with a Murphy bed and a sauna for relaxing after a day on the water or sunbathing on the decks.  The attic contains an artist’s studio for creative endeavors. A wonderful house for entertaining family and friends with the bonus of having the Bay as your neighbor!

 

For more information about this property contact  Lynn Hilfiker with Gunther McClary Real Estate at 410-639-2118 (o), 443-480-1163 (c)  or lynnhilfiker@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Foxchase

Share

This custom built house was built in 1992 and its massing might have been inspired by historic houses that had a central wing with hyphens leading to side wings at each end. The symmetry of the story and a half central wing with the house’s color palette of blue lap siding and white trim was very pleasing. The left hyphen has a small decorative window that leads to the master suite and right hyphen is a solid wall that connects to the garage wing with an in-law/ guest suite above.

The floor plan works very well for everyday family use and for entertaining. The two-story entrance hall with the “L” shaped stair is open on one side to the dining room and on the other side to a room currently used as a billiard room. The dormer window above the front door brings daylight into the space. A short hall leads to the master suite and connects the billiard room to a rear sitting room that is a cozy space with sage green walls, white millwork and comfortable upholstered furnishings.  Double windows at each corner wall creates a sunny space. Behind the dining room is the spacious breakfast/kitchen area that has French doors leading to the large screened porch with expansive views to the landscaped rear yard. The kitchen layout get high marks for being my favorite “L” and island arrangement with its white cabinets, lightly veined granite and stainless steel appliances.

The kitchen/breakfast area connects also to the great room with its pitched ceiling with trimmed collar beams, brick fireplace flanked by tall windows with quarter-circle transoms and built-in millwork for books and the TV.  The furniture tones echo the light gray-green walls with accents of colorful pillows and the subtle pattern of the large rug that anchors the furnishings. The window-sized artwork of a water scene added perspective to one interior wall.  

The master suite is located on the main floor. The second floor bedrooms are tucked under the pitched ceilings with deep dormer windows and knee walls that create great spaces.  A secondary entrance opens to the laundry area and leads to a stair to the in-law suite above the garage. A wonderful family home with a great floor plan that has been lovingly maintained. Was it my imagination or was that Colonel Mustard in the Billiard Room with the candlestick as I closed the front door…?

 

For more information about this property, contact  Peter Heller with Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate Company at 410-778-0330 (o), 410-708-3301 (c) or pheller@cbchesapeake.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Small House, Big Charm

Share

Good things do come in small packages. This small house is located on an urban lot on one of Chestertown’s original streets and is packed with charm. The historic details of the roof eave brackets, the shuttlecocks and the symmetry of door and window arrangement in the front elevation are design elements of Chestertown’s 19th century architecture.  The white lap siding, green accents of the shutters and front door give it great appeal.

The rear elevation has a gable end and a shed roof extension at the main level that breaks the scale down to the landscape and adds character to the architecture. French doors lead to the rear yard that is a shady urban oasis. The brick terrace narrows to a path that leads to a gate in the wooden fence that surrounds the perimeter of the yard.  Trees and plantings break up the hardscape; chairs and a wooden picnic table with an umbrella beckon for relaxing or for sharing an al fresco meal.

The front door opens to an expanse of space with the living and dining areas in the front and the kitchen and laundry at the rear.  The living room has front and side windows and the focal point is a wood stove painted a colorful red. Beautiful hardwood floors and white kitchen cabinets maintain the spacious interior layout.  The French doors at the rear offer views to the yard and allow daylight to penetrate the space from both ends of the room. The window over the kitchen sink cabinet and the glass-fronted upper cabinets keep the compact kitchen light and airy.

Two bedrooms that are spacious master suites  and two baths make this rental easy to share. When I moved to the Shore fifteen years ago rental houses were scarce and I would have loved to find one as attractive as this one!

 

For more information about this property, contact Liddy Campbell with Cross Street Realtors at 410-778-3779 (o), 410-708-5433 (c) or liddy@csrealtors.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Habitat Book Review: “Portals” by Philippa Lewis

Share

One of my favorite Christmas presents this past year is a book from my dear friend, Carol Parlett, which she discovered at a book fair in Philadelphia. I was immediately enchanted by this diminutive book with its black and white cover of a stone bridge surrounded by a rural English scene. The book’s author, Philippa Lewis, is an architectural historian and was intrigued by “gates, stiles, windows, bridges & other crossings” described in these and twenty-four other categories that are the subjects of this delightful book.

Each category is briefly described in two pages, with one page divided between the text and the featured picture(s) along with other illustrations on the opposite page. The exquisite black and white miniature illustrations are either historical references or original drawings by the British artist Miles Thistlewaite.

Like the author, I also had four years of Latin so I was not surprised by her selection of “portals” for her book’s title. She explains “portal” derives from the Latin “carry” (portare) and in her view we are transported elsewhere though harbors, airplanes and railway stations and other means of transport that are the subjects of the book. In the age of the Internet, “portal” now means a gateway to other websites where one has instant access to an infinite amount of information from diverse resources.

The “portals” category includes airports, harbors, and railway stations that the author considers to be “gateways” for travel. Illustrations includes the Berlin Friedrichstrasse station and the Swedish port of Stockholm.

In contrast to man-made portals, the category of “natural portals” includes canyons, gorges and valleys that are natural geographic passes by which we cross mountain ranges. One of the illustrations was the waterfall between rock walls in Snowdonia, Wales. Being an ardent fan of the Sherlock Holmes series, I thought of the famous final confrontation between Holmes and Moriarty at the edge of the Reichenbach Falls, over the Reichenbach, a tributary of the river Aare.

As an architect, her categories of “thresholds” and “doors” were familiar so I was interested in the illustrations she chose. The striking ancient gateway in the wall surrounding Beijing is all that remains of this remarkable edifice. The beautifully drafted sketch of a design for a Parisian ornamented and studded door probably opened onto an interior courtyard. I was intrigued by her reference to the metal “snuffers” for extinguishing a torch before one entered a building in the days before streetlamps and I was charmed by sketches of door handles and knockers.

Perhaps my favorite of her categories was “stairs” since they include such diverse examples as modern treads with open risers, steep steps of the step-form Mayan temple of Teotihuacan which I climbed once, or the illustration of the plan and perspective of the wooden staircase with two graceful turns.

What would a room be without windows? The author devotes one category to “large windows” which were made possible by the development of techniques in glass-making. Sizes and shapes of windows changed forever by this technical breakthrough and made possible the penetration of even more daylight into interiors. I was mesmerized by the exhibit at the National Gallery of “Vermeer and his Contemporaries” where the subjects of the paintings looked out through the frames of large open windows that broadened their view of the world outside as the sunlight filtered in. Two famous houses in the US, Philip Johnson’s Glass house and Mies van der Rohe’s design for the Farnsworth House, windows become full exterior walls entirely of glass.

Several categories dealt with rural life and I was intrigued by the “fences for animals” category. The illustration for a “ha ha” showed a masonry wall next to a wide ditch at the bottom of an embankment that was a clever way to separate the house’s garden and landscape from the grazing areas for livestock.

Several categories were devoted to various “styles”. “Styles Over” were breaks in a fence with protruding stone steps or wooden cross steps that allowed people to cross over but animals could not. “Styles Through” again allowed people to cross over via a bridge style with horizontal planks at each end to deter animals. Another option in metal was the “squeezer style” that resembled an open arced tweezer attached by horizontal iron bars to a masonry or stone fence. The category “Kissing Gate” certainly caught my attention. It was a variation of a turnstile which flapped back and forth in a fence that maintained a barrier to animals but allowed humans through.

Bridges were another category that appealed to me as an architect. The cover of the book shows the 19th century Eltham Bridge at Eltham Palace in Kent, England, with its Gothic styled arches and thick piers. The author noted that the Romans invented stone arches which made it possible to join multiple spans of arches for the aqueducts that delivered water to an empire. The Incas invented the suspension bridge hand woven from natural fibers that had to be renewed or replaced annually for safety.

“Magical Portals” have enchanted children of all ages and I still treasure my childhood copies of “Alice in Wonderland” and “Through the Looking Glass” with their original illustrations. When I first read these books as a child, I was entranced by Alice’s ability to follow the White Rabbit down the rabbit-hole and pass through the looking glass to meet live chess queens and endure a most unusual tea party.

The last category is “The Rainbow”, a bridge or portal in many myths and religions worldwide. It a symbol of the pact of peace between heaven and earth to Christians and Jews. My Scotch-Irish ancestors believed that leprechauns hid pots of gold at a rainbow’s end. The author believes rainbows “remind us of journeys yet to be made”. Great books expand one’s horizons and I am so grateful to the author for my journey through this enlightening and charming book.

“Portals” is a book in “ The Wooden Books Series” and was published by Bloomsbury USA, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing Plc. “Portals” first US edition was in 2018..

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: A Study in Elevations

Share

Looks can be deceiving-when I first saw the front elevation of this house it appeared to be a small one-story cottage but the rear elevation that faces the water was completely different. One story became three-there is a walk-out lower level, a main floor and an upper level. A deck spans the length of the house at the main level and connects to a terrace with a retaining wall for “bird’s eye” views of the water. Wide two-story bay wings from the lower level projected from each side of the rear elevation and were wrapped with windows on both levels; skylights and a trellis at the recessed center bay also enhanced the architecture.

Daylight flooded the great room through the multiple sources of windows and skylights. The open plan began with one long bay window that defines the sitting area inglenook. The fireplace and views to the water created a cozy space that flows into the dining area and kitchen. A partial height wall on one side of the kitchen visually connected the kitchen to the dining and living areas and views to the water. French doors at the center bay and another French door at the dining area lead to the deck.

The overlook from the second floor stair landing down to the great room was my favorite view since the spaces are enclosed by the wall of windows with skylights above the center windows and a large picture window above the French doors to the deck. The side wall also had a large picture window above the dining area triple windows whose header follows the sloped ceiling that encloses the dramatic interior architecture.

The other bay window wing contains the master bedroom with skylights over the French doors to the deck. Since the master bedroom is at the rear corner of the house, side windows combine with the bay windows to give this room panoramic views of the water.

The lower floor contains a large space for a family room with a fireplace, fitness area and a guest bedroom suite. The terrace below the main floor deck above provides shade and views to the water. The other bedrooms are on the third floor. This house maximizes its rooms’ relationship to the water and becomes a great house to enjoy with family and guests.

 

 

For more information about this property, contact Ashton Kelley with Gunther McClary Real Estate at 410-275-2118 (o), 410-708-8144(c) or akelleyre@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”. Photography by Steve Buchanan Photography, 410-212-8753, 310-996-7295, steve@buchananphotography.com, www.buchananphotography.com.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Upper Chester River Dutch Colonial

Share

This house began its architectural life with a couple who built the original section  in 1999 as a weekend retreat. The current owners quickly saw its potential as a permanent home and constructed an addition of over 3,500 sf. of living space that transformed the old and new into a permanent home.  I love the Colonial styles of American architecture and Dutch Colonial is one of my favorites. The gambrel roofs and dormers add charm-the dormers on this house have either double or triple windows for expansive views of the landscape.   

The center hall plan begins at the double French entry doors and ends at the rear single French door and offer vistas to the landscape.  I like how the front doors are in the middle of the front elevation and the triple window above in the largest of the dormers marks the entry behind a long front porch. The telescoped side wing, wide roof dormers and the porch break down the massing for great curb appeal. The rear elevation is equally pleasing with a two story shed roof breaking the gambrel roofs on either side. The terrace the full length of the house paved with interlocking stones is ready for a modern day Fred and Ginger to dance the night away.

The great room is the hub of the house with sitting and dining areas open to the large gourmet kitchen.  Scandinavian styled millwork and dining chairs blend with upholstered pieces for a contemporary look. The second floor master suite at one side of the house has French doors to the deck with stairs to the stone terrace below. The original house is now a guest suite with a sitting area and its own kitchen.

The aerial photograph shows how the house is a short walk through the woods to the Upper Chester River. Great design, privacy in almost three wooded acres- it is no wonder the current owners made it a permanent home.

 

For more information about this property, contact Doug Ashley with Doug Ashley Realtors at 410-810-0010 (o), 410-708-0408 (c) or doug@dougashleyrealtors.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Rive Du Temps

Share

In my orientation class when I was a freshman in architecture at UT Knoxville, the instructor pointed out that most people do not hire architects. Thankfully many people in our area do. Beginning this month, I will add new houses or renovations/additions designed by an architect to the weekly mix of Houses of the Week. This house, christened “Rive Du Temp” by its owner, was designed by Peter Newlin, FAIA, of Chesapeake Architects.

In her preliminary programming discussions with Peter, the Owner asked for a “thoroughly interesting house” with “an intimate experience of the weather and nature”.  She also expressed a fondness for curved walls. Peter listened intently and their collaboration resulted in a site plan and house design that is tres’ magnifique!

The wooded site sits on the bank of the Chester River and the river curves and turns both upriver and downriver to provide broad long views from the house.  The vista across the site is a serene view of woods and off to the right the top part of a silo is the only building in sight. The wooded landscape on either side of the house gives it privacy from its nearest neighbors.

The approach to the house is via a sand colored gravel drive and suddenly you notice the garage and house quietly hidden in the woods by its bark-colored siding. The gravel drive is edged in red brick adjacent to large stone pavers that delineate the walk to the house. After meandering through the landscape you reach a short brick retaining wall with steps down to the clearing at the house and the path continues to the steps at the front door. A previous house had burned and this house was built on top of the original rectangular footprint to maintain the close proximity to the water. The detached garage and the hyphen from the main house to the “summerhouse” disguise the original house’s simple geometry.

The airy summerhouse is a delight with its screened walls and curved ceiling.  The roof decking is painted light cream to reflect the light from the clerestory windows at the rear and to accentuate the bark-brown roof joists.  I could easily imagine dozing in a hammock in this marvelous space through the summer.

In homage to historic Maryland houses, the center hall plan separates one sitting room from the kitchen, dining area and another sitting room.  A rhythm of two rows of beautifully detailed wood columns with headers float below the exposed ceiling joists. The vista ends at French doors to the deck overlooking the water. On either side of the center hall, bowed walls of windows capture the broad views of the river bends, opening the entire rear wall to the water views.  

Another curved wall of cabinetry becomes a boundary to the kitchen area and a soffit above echoes that curvature. Instead of walls, the dining area between the two sitting rooms is defined by millwork on each side and on one side upper cabinets with glass fronts continue the transparency. The cross-axis of the house leads on one side to the hyphen and summerhouse and on the other side are stairs to the second floor bedroom suites.

At the top of the stair is a quarter circle overlook with views through the skylights above the sitting area below that would be the perfect space to inspire creative work. The focal point of the master bedroom is the exquisite wooden carved headboard whose sinuous intertwined form is tucked under low windows that overlook the sitting room below and are opposite skylights for daylight or moonlight to filter within.

The Owner’s collections of Native American pottery and other artifacts from her travels, art, accessories and furnishings articulate this house’s unique personality.  The free-standing chimney that separates one sitting room from the passage to the hyphen and the summerhouse is also slightly curved and is inscribed with lines from a poem by Lamartine: ”Le temps n’a pas de rive, L’homme n’a pas de port “ (Time has no riverbank-Man has no port). A fitting coda for a visit to this remarkable house by a gifted architect and a client with a sophisticated vision. The jury for the Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the AIA agreed and awarded  “Rive du Temp” a Citation of Excellence in Architecture. The house was also featured on an episode of HGTV’s “Dream Builders , episode 1207.

Architecture by Peter Newlin of Chesapeake Architects,  410-778-4899, peter@chesarch.com, www.chesarch.comContractor: Patrick Jones, Allen/Jones Inc. Custom Lighting: Deep Landing Workshop, 410-778-4042, www.deeplandingworkshop.com and Woody Labat, Cabinetmaker Area Rug Designs: Marcy RamseyCustom Headboard:  Sculptor Don Carslon and Joshua Miller, Cabinetmaker  Photography: Tyler Campbell, 410-778-4938, tylercam@friend.ly.net

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

 

Spy House of the Week: Pining for Pine Acres

Share

“Green Acres” was a late sixties sitcom about a New York City attorney who pines for “farm living” and persuades his reluctant wife to give up their New York penthouse. If he had been a boater instead, I could imagine his pining for this “Pine Acres” property surrounded by 3-1/4 wooded acres and a dock on Lovely Cove which leads to the East Fork of Langford Creek. This cottage style house very close to the water make this property a tranquil weekend retreat. Outbuildings include a garage, workshop, storage and potting sheds for non-nautical weekend pursuits.

The house is perpendicular to the water to give panoramic views of the water from most rooms in the house. The symmetrical middle wing with two pairs of triple windows and two dormer windows above has two wings on either side. One wing has a bay window to the master bedroom and the other wing is a sunroom with wrap-around windows broken by the chimney. The color palette of pale yellow siding, light green metal roof, white windows and the massing is a very pleasing combination.  

The contemporary kitchen has corner windows above the sink and a table for informal meals.  The main sitting room is open to the sunroom for views of the water beyond to expand the living space. The interior design contains Oriental accents in the Shojii screen doors in the bath, the master bedroom headboard and other details.  The loft contains another bedroom with a window in the gable end and a dormer windows facing the water.

A serene waterfront setting and charming cottage architectural style-an appealing  weekend retreat. Now, if I can just get that “Green Acres” jingle out of my head…

For more information about this property ,contact Dick Barker with Coldwell Banker Real Estate Company at 410-778-0330 (o), 410-708-7594 (c),  “Equal Housing Opportunity.”

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

×
We're glad you're enjoying The Chestertown Spy.

Sign up for the the free email blast to see what's new in the Spy. It's delivered right to your inbox at 3PM sharp.

Sign up here.