Washington College to Offer New Program WC Adventures

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Come explore with Washington College! One of the greatest things about WC is the out-of-the-classroom learning experiences. But why should the students have all of the fun? Washington College has started a new program offering experiential learning and travel experiences for the community. Sessions for 2019 include trips to Cuba and Germany/Austria and a mini local session that includes sailing on the Sultana and experiencing the Eastern Shore Food Lab. Programming for 2020 is in the works with trips to Costa Rica and Northern Ireland already confirmed.

WC Adventures programs are open to the entire Washington College community (alumni, parents, friends, staff/faculty, spouses, kids, neighbors, community members…but maybe not your pet turtle).

Find an upcoming program that sparks your interest and join WC on an adventure!

Click here for more information about WC Adventures.

Delaware Supreme Court Chief Justice at WC Commencement

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Delaware Supreme Court Chief Justice Leo E. Strine, Jr.

Delaware Supreme Court Chief Justice Leo E. Strine, Jr., whom Business Insider has called “one of the most influential behind-the-scenes figures in American business,” will be the speaker at Washington College’s 286th Commencement on May 19th. Strine, who became chief justice of Delaware’s highest court in 2014, will receive the honorary degree Doctor of Laws.

Known for his forthright outspokenness and rapier wit, Strine is “about the closest thing to a celebrity in the buttoned-up world of corporate law,” according to The Wall Street Journal. His opinions “are considered among the most influential rulings in corporate law,” says The New York Times.

Before becoming the eighth chief justice of Delaware’s Supreme Court, Strine, at 34 years old, was one of the youngest judges ever to sit on the Delaware Court of Chancery, becoming Vice Chancellor since 1998. In each of these positions, he has issued some of the most influential decisions affecting corporate law in the nation, because more than half of publicly traded U.S. companies—among them 66.8 percent of the Fortune 500—are incorporated in Delaware.

As chief justice, Strine has emphasized the need to address persistent racial inequality and to provide more equitable access to justice for all Delawareans, regardless of wealth. Among his many decisions as chief justice, Strine authored the decision striking down Delaware’s death penalty statute because it denied defendants the right to have their fate determined by a jury.

Strine holds long-standing teaching positions at Harvard and University of Pennsylvania, where he teaches classes in corporate law addressing, among other topics, mergers and acquisitions, the role of independent directors, valuation, and corporate law theories. He also serves as a Senior Fellow of the Harvard Program on Corporate Governance, as well as acting as an advisor to Penn’s Institute for Law & Economics.

He speaks and writes frequently on the subject of corporate law, and his articles have been published in The University of Chicago Law ReviewColumbia Law ReviewHarvard Law Review, and Stanford Law Review, among others. Before joining the court, Strine served as counsel and policy director to former Delaware Governor Thomas R. Carper, who awarded him the Order of the First State in 2000. In 2006, he was selected as a Henry Crown Fellow at the Aspen Institute.

Washington College’s 286th Commencement will be held on Sunday, May 19, 2019, at 10:30 a.m. on the campus green, weather permitting. If outdoors, it is free and open to the public. If inclement weather drives the ceremony into the Johnson Fitness Center Field House, admittance is by ticket only. Each graduate is given nine tickets to distribute to family and friends.

Barry Glassman ’84, County Executive of Harford County, Maryland, and Carolyn Choate-Turnbull ’80 P’15, a retired television producer and breast cancer survivor, activist, and advocate, will receive Alumni Citations for Excellence in their fields during Commencement ceremonies.

The event will also be livestreamed here: https://www.washcoll.edu/offices/digital-media-services/live/

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

WC to Host Meet and Greet Event Featuring Justice Leo Strine, Jr.

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Washington College is hosting a meet and greet event featuring Justice Leo Strine, Jr. on Saturday, April 27th at 4pm in Hynson Lounge. It truly is a once in a lifetime opportunity to meet the Chief Justice of the Delaware Supreme court. He will be making some remarks and there will be a networking opportunity afterwards.

There will also be 25 special law affiliated alumni, faculty members and Board members scheduled to attend including Joe Getty, who is a judge on the Maryland Court of Appeals. Getty was appointed to that court in 2016, by Governor Larry Hogan. He is a former state senator and delegate, where he represented Maryland’s 5th district.

Here is the event invitation on the WC site:

https://www.washcoll.edu/live/events/21584-meet-and-greet-the-honorable-leo-strine-jr

And more information about Leo Strine:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_E._Strine_Jr.

This event is free and open to the public. We hope you can join us!

Washington Rarities on Display at Miller Library

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Physician’s scales used by Washington’s personal doctor

Washington College’s Miller Library is hosting a special exhibit of items related to George Washington this weekend. The exhibit, in the Sophie Kerr rare books room on the library’s second floor, is a special feature for Admitted Students day, Saturday, April 13. However, the general public may get a special preview of the exhibit on Thursday, April 11, 1 to 3 p.m. and Friday, April 12, from 11 a.m. 1 p.m.

The exhibit has drawn rare books and other items from the college’s archives to give a historic portrait of the college’s long relationship with its benefactor and namesake. Anyone interested in Colonial history, and its resonance through the two centuries since Washington’s death, should make it a point to visit this exhibit.

Jennifer Nesbitt, the administrative assistant at Miller Library, gave your Spy reporter a tour of the exhibits, pointing out items of particular interest. While many of the objects are special, perhaps the prize of the collection is a set of physician’s scales used by Dr. Elisha Cullen Dick, who attended Washington on his deathbed. They were donated to the college by Dick’s great-grandson, James Alfred Pearce Crisfield.

Another unique item is Alexander Hamilton’s personal copy of Washington’s A Message from the President of the United States to Congress, with Hamilton’s handwritten signature on the title page.

Alexander Hamilton’s copy of a published address by Washington

But these items just scratch the surface of the exhibit, which includes not only rare and historic books, but a Victorian needlework portrait of Washington, copied from the Gilbert Stuart portrait, and a bust of Washington made from Confederate paper money after the Civil War. And there is a commemorative linen handkerchief from 1806, with quotations from Washington’s farewell speech. Commemorative handkerchiefs were popular after American Independence, on account of British colonial policies that forbade colonists from manufacturing cloth items. This policy was designed to support British manufacturers at the expense of the colonies, so after the American Revolution, locally produced cloth became an important industry and symbol of political and economic independence. Handkerchiefs like this one were made and sold as souvenirs and keepsakes.

A Victorian needlework copy of the Gilbert Stuart portrait of Washington

Nesbitt said the college plans to bring out other items from its special collections for public viewing on a regular basis. It’s a good reminder just how special the college’s collections are, and what a great resource they are for the Chestertown community.

A commemorative handkerchief from 1806 with quotes from Washingtons Farewell Address

All photos from George Washington Exhibit, unless otherwise noted, are by Peter Heck.

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Cristina Jiménez Headlines New “Crossing Cultures” Series on April 16 at WC

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Photo credit: John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Cristina Jiménez—immigration reform advocate, MacArthur Foundation “genius award” Fellow, and founder and CEO of the nation’s largest immigrant youth-led organization—will speak at Washington College on Tuesday, April 16. She will share the powerful story of her own journey, from arriving in the US at age 13 as an undocumented immigrant from Ecuador, to her current role in the forefront of the global conversation on immigration. In 2018, Time magazine named Jiménez one of the “100 most influential people” in the world.

The program begins at 5:30 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall.  Hosted by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the event is free and open to the public. This event is the inaugural program in the Starr Center’s series “Crossing Cultures,” an initiative that seeks to foster informed dialogue on immigration, migration, intercultural exchange, and their impact on American life.

“At a moment when discussions of immigration and migration are dominated by soundbites, half-truths, and social-media hits, it’s more essential than ever to seek informed perspectives and engage in thoughtful civic conversation,” said Adam Goodheart, the Starr Center’s Hodson Trust-Griswold Director. “We’re excited to welcome Cristina Jiménez as the first of a diverse array of guests in the timely new Crossing Cultures series.”

Cristina Jiménez is the co-founder and executive director of the United We Dream (UWD). She has organized immigrant youth and workers for the passage of pro-immigrant policies at the local and national levels for over a decade. As undocumented immigrants, she and her family experienced poverty, abuse by police, wage theft from employers, and fear of deportation.

Her story is similar to those of United We Dream members across the country who struggle every day to overcome the forces of racism, xenophobia, and misogyny, and who ultimately learn to thrive. Jiménez will discuss how those closest to the pain are closest to the solution and how immigrant youth have transformed politics to create an empowered generation.

From a young age, Jiménez made a decision to fight back against unjust practices that plagued people of color and the immigrant community. As an adult, she was instrumental in organizing the successful national campaign that led to the creation and implementation of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival Program (DACA). Under Jiménez’s leadership, United We Dream has grown to a powerful network of 48 affiliates in 26 states and over 400,000 members.

Jiménez has received several high-profile awards and honors, including Forbes’s “30 under 30 in Law and Policy;” and “40 under 40 Young Leaders Who are Solving Problems of Today and Tomorrow” by the Chronicle of Philanthropy. Prior to her work at UWD, Jiménez co-founded the New York State Youth Leadership Council, and the Dream Mentorship Program at Queens College. She holds a master’s degree in Public Administration and Public Policy from the School of Public of Affairs at Baruch College, CUNY.

Established in 2000, Washington College’s Starr Center explores the American experience in all its diversity and complexity, seeks creative approaches to illuminating the past, and inspires thoughtful conversation informed by history. Jiménez’s talk is cosponsored by the Department of History, Program in American Studies, Department of Modern Languages, Hispanic Studies, Black Studies, Department of Education, Cleopatra’s Sisters, Día de Futbol, the Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology, and the Office of Intercultural Affairs.

 

About Washington College
Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Gene Demby to Speak at Washington College on April 17

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American journalist and blogger Gene Demby will speak on Wednesday, April 17, at the Rose O’Neill Literary House. The event, which is part of the annual Sophie Kerr Lecture Series, will start at 4:30 p.m., and is free and open to the public.

Demby is the lead blogger for NPR’s Code Switch team where he covers issues on race, ethnicity, and culture. He is also cohost of the weekly Code Switch podcast. Before coming to NPR, he served as the managing editor for Huffington Post’s BlackVoices following its launch. He later covered politics.

Prior to that role he spent six years in various positions at The New York Times. While working for the Times in 2007, he started a blog about race, culture, politics, and media called “PostBourgie,” which won the 2009 Black Weblog Award for Best News/Politics Site.

For more information on this and other English Department and Sophie Kerr events, visit the website at www.washcoll.edu/departments/english/events.php, or view our annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/8293-2018-19-literary-events-brochure.

 

About Washington College
Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

WC-ALL April Learn at Lunch with Dr. Bill Schindler

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Washington College Professor Bill Schindler will present WC-ALL’s final spring term Learn at Lunch on Thursday, April 18. The catered buffet luncheon begins at 12 noon in Hynson Lounge of Hodson Hall on the Washington College campus. Following lunch, Dr. Schindler will present “Food Evolution Revolution: The Cutting Edge Fusion of Archaeology, Anthropology, and the Modern Kitchen.”

According to Schindler, understanding the role that technology played in our 3.4 million-year-old dietary past is essential in learning to rethink food and diet. Biologically speaking, humans and human nutritional needs remain relatively unchanged over the centuries; yet our cultural needs have seismically shifted and our expectations of taste, smell, texture, and presentation have significantly changed the way we think about food. By fusing lessons from our dietary past with modern culinary techniques, Schindler believes we can create a food system that is meaningful, accessible, relevant, and delectable.

Schindler is not a traditional anthropologist. Specializing in primitive technology and experimental archaeology at Washington College, he uses a teaching approach that he calls “soul authorship” to immerse students in experiences that teach them first-hand about primitive technologies and ways of life practiced by our prehistoric ancestors. Today he applies prehistoric-focused approaches in experimental archaeology to address a major issue facing humans right now: diet. By reconnecting with the food of our ancient ancestors,Schindler believes that we can find solutions to building a more sustainable, healthful food system. In this quest, Schindler, who holds a Ph.D. from Temple University, completed a year-long research endeavor called the Food Evolutions Project. He traveled the world working with indigenous groups, traditional societies, and Michelin star chefs. Most recently he launched the Eastern Shore Food Lab at Washington College, a center dedicated to empowering the public to reconnect with their food, take control of what they eat, and learn to eat like humans again!

Reservations for April’s Learn at Lunch are due by Friday, April 12. The cost is $20 for WC-ALL members and $25 for others. Please send a check to WC-ALL at 300 Washington Ave., Chestertown, MD 21620 with name, phone, and email for those attending. Payment must accompany the reservation and no phone or email reservations are accepted. For more information, call 410-778-7221.

Award-Winning Author Diana Butler Bass at Washington College April 10

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Theologian and author Diana Butler Bass, whose book Grateful: The Transformative Power of Giving Thanks was recognized this year as the top non-fiction book in national secular media by the esteemed 70-year-old Wilbur Awards, will speak at Washington College on “Politics of Gratitude: The Subversive Vision of the New Testament in the Age of Trump.”

Sponsored by the College’s Institute of Religion Politics and Culture and Political Science Department, the talk on April 10 in Hynson Lounge begins at 5 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

Bass is an author, speaker, and independent scholar specializing in American religion and culture. She holds a Ph.D. in religious studies from Duke University and is the award-winning author of ten books, including Grounded: Finding God in the World —A Spiritual Revolution (HarperOne, 2015), Christianity After Religion: The End of Church and the Birth of a New Spiritual Awakening (HarperOne, 2012) and Christianity for the Rest of Us: How the Neighborhood Church is Transforming the Faith (HarperOne, 2006).

Her latest book, Grateful: The Transformative Power of Giving Thanks (HarperOne, 2018), won the 2019 Religion Communicators Council’s Wilbur Award for the best book in non-fiction secular media (the fiction award was won by Mitch Albom for The Next Person You Meet in Heaven). Conferred since 1949, the Wilbur Awards honor excellence in secular media—print and online journalism, book publishing, broadcasting, and motion pictures—for communicating religious issues, values, and themes. Previous winners include Oprah Winfrey, Morgan Freeman, and films like “Chocolat” and “Hidden Figures.”

Along with her books, Bass’s bylines include The Washington PostThe New York Times Syndicate, and The Huffington Post. She has commented widely on religion, politics, and culture in the media including USA TODAYTimeNewsweek, CBS, CNN, FOX, PBS, NPR, Sirius XM, and CBC. In addition to the Wilbur, she has won other numerous grants and awards including the Nautilus Gold Medal, the Book of the Year from Religion News Service, and the Frank S. and Elizabeth D. Brewer Prize of the American Society of Church History.

About Washington College Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Revolutionary War Scholar Patrick Spero at Washington College April 4

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Historian Patrick Spero, whose study of the 18th-century frontier is bringing a new perspective to the roots of the American Revolution, will give a talk on April 4 about the forgotten story of a band of rebels, known as the Black Boys, whose protests helped ignite the battle for American independence.

Spero, librarian and director of the American Philosophical Society Library in Philadelphia, will discuss his new book, Frontier Rebels: The Fight for Independence in the American West, 1765 -1776, at the Toll Science Center’s Litrenta Hall. The program begins at 5:30 p.m. and will be followed by a book signing. Sponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, the event is free and open to the public.

Publishers’ Weekly starred review praises Frontier Rebels: “[Spero delves] deeply into previously underutilized sources. .  . Spero’s thoughtful work is an important contribution to ongoing reassessments of the nature and meaning of the American founding.”

While the familiar narrative of the origins of the American Revolution focuses on taxation and the colonies along the eastern seaboard, in the west frontiersmen clashed with the British Empire over Indian relations. When Britain launched an expedition into the American interior to open trade with the Indian warrior Pontiac, the Black Boys led an uprising to stop it. Spero asserts that suspicion and distrust of both Natives and imperial aims fueled the flames of rebellion on the frontier years before the Declaration of Independence.

As a scholar of early American history, Spero has published books, essays and reviews on the American Revolution, including Frontier Country: The Politics of War in Early Pennsylvania (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), and the edited anthology The American Revolution Reborn: New Perspectives for the Twenty-First Century (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016). Prior to his appointment at the American Philosophical Society, Spero served on the faculty at Williams College.

Spero has been involved in a number of public history initiatives throughout his career, including serving as historian at the David Library of the American Revolution, leading teacher workshops for the Gilder-Lehrman Institute and National Endowment for the Humanities, lecturing about political leadership to business professionals and special groups, consulting on exhibits and other projects, and serving on various boards.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 39 states and territories and 25 nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

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