Ken and Brad Kolodner Quartet at The Mainstay May 18

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The dynamic father-son duo Ken & Brad Kolodner are joined by Rachel Eddy on fiddle, guitar and vocals and Alex Laquement on bass. They weave together a mesmerizing soundscape on hammered dulcimer, banjo and fiddles and push the boundaries of the Old-Time tradition into uncharted territory. Regarded as one of the most influential hammered dulcimer players and Old-Time fiddlers in North America, Baltimore’s Ken Kolodner has joined forces with his son Brad Kolodner, a rising star in the clawhammer banjo world. Together, they infuse their own brand of driving, innovative, tasteful and unique interpretations of traditional and original fiddle tunes and songs. They perform tight and musical arrangements of original and traditional old-time music with a “creative curiosity that lets all listeners know that a passion for traditional music yet thrives in every generation.” At this concert, they add bassist Alex Lacquementwho locks everything together with his commanding approach and multi-instrumentalist Rachel Eddy (fiddle, banjo, guitar and vocals), a former member of the Old-Time supergroup Uncle Earl.

The Mainstay (Home of Musical Magic) is the friendly informal storefront performing arts center on Rock Hall’s old time Main Street. It is a 501(c)(3), nonprofit dedicated to the arts, serving Rock Hall, MD and the surrounding region and is committed to presenting local, regional and national level talent, at a reasonable price, in an almost perfect acoustic setting. Information and advance ticket sales are available on the Mainstay’s website http://www.mainstayrockhall.org.

Upcoming Mainstay performances include:

May 14 – Joe Holt welcomes Tom Lagana
May 18 – Ken and Brad Kolodner Quartet
May 20 – Chester River Youth Choir
May 21 – Joe Holt welcomes Michael DeMaio
May 28 – Joe Holt welcomes Tom McHugh
June 2 – Uptown Vocal Jazz Quartet
June 22 – Barbara Parker with Joe Holt and Camillo Carrara
June 23 – Grand Ole Ditch
June 30 – Charlie Byrd Tribute with Chuck Redd All-Stars

“Sweeney Todd” at the Garfield — a Review by Peter Heck

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Anyone who enjoys the theater should make it a point to see Sweeney Todd – The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, by Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler, currently playing at the Garfield Center for the Arts.

Directed by Shelagh Grasso, with musical direction by Julie Lawrence, Sweeney Todd is an intense, sometimes overwhelming, story of murder, cannibalism, injustice – and love.  With a touch of humor. That’s a tall order and the Garfield production comes through.

Originally a 1973 play by Christopher Bond, Sweeney Todd takes its material from the Victorian “penny dreadfuls”– one of which introduced the murderous barber Todd in a serialized thriller, “The String of Pearls” in the late 1840s. It was so popular that it was turned into a play even before its final installment, and numerous spin-offs followed. Bond added a level of psychological sophistication to the Victorian original, and the London production of the play inspired Sondheim to adapt it as a musical in 1979.

The sailor Anthony rescued and befriended barber Sweeney Todd.      Photo by Carmen Grasso

The original Broadway production featured Len Cariou in the title role and Angela Lansbury as Mrs. Lovett, his partner in crime, with Hal Prince directing. It ran for 557 performances before going on a national tour. It won an astounding eight Tony Awards, and followed up with nine Drama Desk awards – including best musical, best male and female actors, best director, and best score. Not surprisingly, it has been revived numerous times, with a 2007 film adaptation starring Johnny Depp.

The plot revolves around a London barber banished to the penal colonies of Australia on trumped-up charges by a crooked judge who had designs on the barber’s wife. Now fifteen years later, the barber has returned to England, accompanied by a young sailor, Anthony Hope, who rescued him at sea. After telling Anthony a version of his tale, Todd goes to a meat pie shop on Fleet Street, where the proprietress, Mrs. Lovett complains about how hard it is to find meat. He asks her about her upstairs apartment, which he reveals that he himself used to rent under his former name before he was arrested. She tells him, in turn, that his wife committed suicide and that the crooked judge adopted his then-infant daughter Johanna.

Mrs. Lovett agrees to rent him the apartment and promises to keep his secret. She also gives him back his old set of razors which she has kept all these years, so he can go back into business as a barber again. But Todd has sworn revenge on the judge, and that decision shapes everything else that happens.

Meanwhile, Anthony has seen a beautiful young woman singing out of her window, and falls instantly in love with her. Her name, he learns, is Johanna – then the judge and his beadle chase him away, threatening bodily harm if he returns. Unwittingly, he has fallen in love with Todd’s daughter.

Back on Fleet Street. Todd wins a shaving contest against an Italian barber, Pirelli, allowing him to call himself the best barber in London. The judge’s beadle, impressed, makes an appointment to come back for a shave – which Todd sees as a chance for revenge on one of the men who framed him. When Anthony then appears and tells of his love for Johanna, Todd promises Anthony he can use his shop as a meeting place for their elopement.

But before that can happen, Pirelli and his assistant Tobias appear and Pirelli asks for a shave. Mrs. Lovett takes Tobias downstairs for a meat pie, and Pirelli reveals that he knows who Todd is and tries to blackmail him. So Todd slits his throat and Mrs. Lovett makes Tobias an assistant, pretending that Pirelli has been called away on business. And she sees the need to dispose of the body as an opportunity – after all, she still needs meat for her pie business!

From there, the plot moves inevitably toward its conclusion – a dark and bloody apocalypse in the great tradition of the “penny dreadful.” Needless to say, this is not a play for young children – perhaps not for anyone disturbed by the sight of stage blood, or who thought Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” was too gross. However, it’s important to note that while the plot has numerous on-stage murders, there is really not a lot of blatant on-stage gore. But there’s no excuse for anyone else to miss this production – one of the most powerful in the local theater in recent years.

Grasso has assembled a top-notch cast, with many who are making their first local appearance.

Christopher Wallace, who directed CHT’s recent production of Witness for the Prosecution, plays the title role. He does a nice job walking the fine line between Todd as a victim of injustice and as a monster – both aspects of which come to the fore at different times. A memorable performance in a difficult role.

Jane Copple, who has a long string of credits in Church Hill Theatre musicals, is a good fit for the role of Mrs. Lovett. Her voice is one of the best in the cast, and she conveys the comic aspects of the character well.

Max Hagan, who has a theater degree from Sewanee, gets to show off a nice voice as Anthony Hope. One of the most sympathetic characters in this generally dark play, he could be seen as the moral center of the play.

Thwarted lovers Anthony and Johanna in “Sweeney Todd” at Garfield Theatre        Photo by Carmen Grasso

Natalie Lane, who previously appeared in the Garfield production of My Fair Lady, plays Tobias, the young boy who becomes an apprentice to Mrs. Lovett in the pie shop. Her voice is excellent and she is convincing as a London street urchin.

Matt Folker is cast as Judge Terpin, the main villain of the piece, and Nic Carter plays Beadle Bamford, his unsavory henchman. Both do fine jobs of embodying the entrenched evil that ends up creating a serial murderer, the “demon barber of Fleet Street.”

Jane Copple as Mrs. Lovett, Christopher Wallace as Sweeney Todd, and Melissa McGlynn as the Beggar Woman/Lucy in “Sweeney Todd”, a 2018 production at Garfield Theatre.      Photo by Carmen Grasso

Melissa McGlynn plays a beggar woman who turns out to have a more significant role in the plot than first appears. A solid performance from one of our local theatrical stars.

Shannon Whitaker is well cast as Johanna, Sweeney’s daughter. She displays a beautiful singing voice in her featured number, “Green Finch and Linnet Bird.”

Zack Schagg, Howard Messick, Zac Ryan and Kendall Davis round out the list of characters with speaking parts, and all do good jobs. Likewise the chorus – which includes a large number of familiar on-stage faces – is an impressive presence, acting, as Grasso said after the opening night performance, almost as a Greek chorus, telling the story in operatic style. There is a wonderful “madhouse” scene in which Anthony goes to rescue Johanna from the lunatic asylum.  The lunatics–in particular, Marcia Gilliam–are delightfully mad. And then there is the “more pie” scene where the local townspeople wipe their lips and swing their mugs of ale while calling for “more pie”.  All in song!

The set, designed and built by Carmen Grasso, is astonishing in its own right. The main piece, sitting at center stage, swivels around to show two different fronts – one Mrs. Lovett’s pie shop, the other a generic street scene. On a second level, it shows Todd’s barbershop – including a chute down which he drops the victims of his butchery so the “meat” can be used for pies.  A very clever and useful feature!  And this is just the centerpiece – there are levels upon levels all around it, with chorus members lurking to observe and add their voices where the score calls for it. There’s even scaffolding out in the audience, behind the orchestra pit. Be sure to look all around you as the play goes on – there’s a lot happening!

“Sweeney Todd” performance at Garfield Theatre          Photo by Carmen Grasso

The costuming convincingly recreates the look of 1840s London working and middle class.  In the early scenes, both Lovett and Todd’s clothes are worn and not of the highest fashion.  But as the “pie” shop prospers, both characters sport a posher look, with Todd in a good-quality suit and Mrs. Lovett wearing a fashionable dress with a beautiful–and obviously expensive–embroidered shawl. Johanna, the barber’s daughter, looked lovely in a white gown and long flowing tresses.  A great wig!  Good job by costume designer Barbi Bedell and her crew.

In fact, despite the complexity of the choreography and blocking and the large number of characters onstage at any given time, the play feels very tight. Grasso has done an impressive job bringing everything together into a unified whole. This only adds to her already high ranking among directors in the local theater community.  A special mention should also go to choreographer and assistant director Greg Minahan.  Minahan comes to the Garfield with an impressive list of credits that include singing, dancing and choreography on Broadway in such productions as CATS and Peter Pan.  Locally, Minihan has acted and directed for both Shore Shakespeare and Church Hill Theatre.

A couple of quibbles. The dialogue was sometimes hard to understand – especially with characters singing in Cockney accents. Occasionally, lyrics were covered up by the orchestra – especially in some chorus pieces. This may improve as the cast settles in. And the lighting seemed dimmer in spots than it might have been.  There were also a few opening-night glitches such as when actors moved out of their spotlights.  But nothing that really detracted from the enjoyment of the production.

“Sweeney Todd” performance at Garfield Theatre      Photo by Carmen Grasso

Sondheim’s music is complex and challenging.  Some songs are gentle and sweet, expressing themes of love and loyalty, such as the duet “Not While I’m Around” between Mrs. Lovett and Tobias.  But Sondheim also uses dissonance–sometimes high-volume dissonance–to convey the more shocking emotional elements of the story.  This is, after all, a story of murder and mayhem! And the music reflects that.  Those who are more attuned to the musicals of Rodgers and Hammerstein or Lerner and Loewe may want to adjust their expectations accordingly.   I myself lean more toward Gershwin and Porter but found the music in  Sweeny Todd to be both powerful and dramatically effective.

There’s plenty of energy, and the orchestra seemed to be very tight. The quality of the singers’ voices is universally high. There were a couple of points where two singers in a duet appeared to be in different keys – but without having the score right there, it was hard to tell if this was intentional or not. Again it was not enough to detract from the overall excellence of the music.  Of course, given the theme of the show, it is consistent for the music–though quite lyrical at times–to also be uncomfortable at other points.  Kudos to Julie Lawrence who brought it all together.

Sweeney Todd, as noted above, is an intense, gripping theatrical experience, and Grasso’s production pulls no punches.  Note that it is a long show, running just under three hours.  The local theater community deserves high marks for bringing this show to the Garfield and bringing to it such an effective performance. Go see it.

Sweeney Todd runs at the Garfield through May 13, with performances at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sundays. For reservations, call 410-810-2960 or visit boxoffice@garfieldcenter.org.

The local beggar and mad woman confronts Anthony.  Sweeney Todd at the Garfield Theatre. Photo by Carmen Grasso

Another victim of the Demon Barber meets his fate in “Sweeney Todd” at Garfield Theatre.      Photo by Carmen Grasso

Mrs. Lovett and her assistant Tobias in “Sweeney Todd” at Garfield Theatre.     Photo by Carmen Grasso

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Mid-Shore AGO to Sponsor Festival with Mid-Shore Musicians

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On Sunday, May 6 at 4 pm, the Mid-Shore Maryland Chapter of the American Guild of Organists will present a Festival of Hymns for Brass, Organ, Timpani, Handbells, and a choir of around sixty voices.  The event will take place at Christ Church in Easton located at 111 S. Harrison Street.

This year’s festival is the third such event hosted by the nearly four-year old chapter.  Each year, the event draws both musicians and attendees from throughout the Delmarva region, and this year’s festival will feature the largest combination of musicians to date.  The choir will be comprised of singers from as far away as Odessa , Delaware, and will include many from Talbot County.  A professional brass quintet and timpanist will also add festival flare to this popular annual event, along with the region’s premier community handbell ensemble, Bells of the Bay.  Featured music will include hymns favorite and new using various combinations of the gathered musical forces as well as a solo organ piece presented on one of shore’s largest instruments.

The Mid-Shore Maryland AGO sponsors a full lineup of events throughout the year to promote both Organ and Sacred Music.  Each year, the guild sponsors clinicians and musicians at both the national and local level  who  lead in workshops and various programs designed to assist and enhance music in churches throughout the area.  For the second year, the Mid-Shore AGO has also underwritten Pipedreams, a nationally syndicated program of organ music which can be heard on WSCL 89.5 FM radio each Sunday evening.

This Sunday’s hymn festival is free and open to the public.  Doors will open at 3:30 pm, and a freewill offering will be received to support this and other events sponsored by the Mid-Shore MD AGO.

Master Organist Ken Cowan Returns to Chestertown for 23rd Year May 4

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Ken Cowan will make his 23rd consecutive appearance at Emmanuel Church on May 4th. This remarkably talented organist has played every year to enthusiastic followers since Emmanuel’s Harrison organ was installed. Besides displaying a huge variety of organ compositions at his recitals, all of the music is memorized.

Recent feature performances have included appearances at Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa California, Philadelphia’s Verizon Hall, Spivey Hall, and Walt Disney Concert Hall, as well as concerts in Germany and Korea. In addition, Mr. Cowan has been a featured artist in recent years at the national conventions of the American Guild of Organists held in Los Angeles and Minneapolis, has performed at many regional conventions of the AGO, and has been featured at several conventions of the Organ Historical Society and the Royal Canadian College of Organists.

Ken received the Master’s degree and Artist Diploma from the Yale School of Music/Institute of Sacred Music, studying organ with Thomas Murray. Prior to attending Yale, he graduated with a Bachelor of Music degree from the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia where he studied with John Weaver. His major teacher during high school years was James Bingham, Organist/Choirmaster at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, in Buffalo, NY, which is not far from his hometown Thorold, Ontario, Canada.

In 2012 Mr. Cowan joined the keyboard faculty of the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University as Associate Professor and head of the organ program.

For more information and ticket information please go here

Ben Price and Cliff City at The Mainstay April 28

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Local rising stars Ben Price and Cliff City bring their original tunes to The Mainstay! $10 online AND phone reservation/door.

Cliff City is a newly formed band of friends that practice locally in Kent County.  Their music is a mix of Indie Folk and Pop. Band members are Gabriel Warner on bass, Nick Basham on drums, Alex Spry on lead guitar and bandleader Ben Price on guitar and vocals. Please join us at The Mainstay for an evening of the freshest new sounds in Kent County!

Ben Price is a high school senior who has been playing guitar, singing and writing music for most of his life.  At an early age, Ben was taught by his father and has continued on to study classical Spanish guitar with Kent County’s esteemed strings teacher, Tom Anthony.  Ben has played locally for First Friday events in Chestertown, at the Downrigging Festival and other town events.  He will be attending Full Sail University in Winter Park, Florida next year and plans to major in music production.

Nick Basham, also a high school senior, has been playing drums for seven years.  He has studied with numerous master drummers and Nick’s previous band, Ricochet, has played at The Avalon (Easton, MD) and the Baltimore Soundstage.  Nick plans to major in business and music next year when he enters college.

Gabriel Warner is 17 and has been playing bass guitar since 6th grade.  He is a self-taught musician who has drawn most of his play style and influence from Punk and Pop Rock and has toured around Maryland with his previous band, The 47, playing multiple venues including The Baltimore Soundstage and The Fish Head Cantina.

Alex Spry has been playing guitar for 20 years.  You may have caught him at (the former) Andy’s Bar, the Garfield Center for the Arts or in many of the Music in the Park performances in Chestertown.

This concert is a production of The Mainstay’s Byrd’s Nest featuring student work.  Special thanks to The Peoples Bank for supporting young artists.The Mainstay (Home of Musical Magic) is the friendly informal storefront performing arts center on Rock Hall’s old time Main Street. It is a 501(c)(3), nonprofit dedicated to the arts, serving Rock Hall, MD and the surrounding region and is committed to presenting local, regional and national level talent, at a reasonable price, in an almost perfect acoustic setting. Information and advance ticket sales are available on the Mainstay’s website http://www.mainstayrockhall.org.

Upcoming Mainstay performances include:

April 30 Joe Holt welcomes Cody Leavel
May 4 John Thomas Quartet
May 6 Teodora Adzharova
May 7 Joe Holt welcomes Sam Guthridge
May 10 YacineBoulares and Ajoyo
May 14 Joe Holt welcomes Matt Brower
May 18 Ken and Brad Kolodner Quartet
May 20 Chester River Youth Choir
May 21 Joe Holt welcomes Michael DeMaio

Garfield Center to Present Sondheim’s Dark Musical Sweeney Todd

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On April 27th director Shelagh Grasso and musical director Julie Lawrence will be opening a new musical at the Garfield Center for the Arts; Stephen Sondheim & Hugh Wheeler’s Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. This will be the first musical that the Garfield Center has produced since Garfield Executive Director Tess Hogans directed My Fair Lady in 2016. This is a big year for musicals at the Garfield Center, with Jennifer Kafka Smith directing The Marx Bros. musical comedy, Animal Crackers in September.

The story of Sweeney Todd first appeared in the 1830s in England and was soon adapted for the London stage. When Stephen Sondheim, the celebrated producer of hit Broadway musicals, saw a version of the play in London in the mid 1970s, he asked Hugh Wheeler to collaborate with him on a musical adaptation. When the new Sweeney Todd opened on Broadway in 1979, it became an instant hit and later walked away with that year’s Tony award—Broadway’s highest honor.

The public was shocked but thoroughly entertained by the gruesome storyline of this musical thriller, which focuses on the murderous machinations of a vengeful English barber and his accommodating landlady. The play follows the barber, Sweeney Todd, as he plots his revenge against Judge Turpin, who sent him to prison on false charges—an act which causes the destruction of Sweeney’s family. As Sweeney’s revenge plot accidentally broadens to include other citizens of the corrupt society of Victorian London, his landlady, Mrs. Lovett, finds a way to cover up the barber’s crimes as well as her own. Through this darkly comic story, Wheeler explores the motivations for, and consequences of, revenge.

This new cast consists actors who frequent the Garfield stage, as well as a surprising number of new faces. The cast includes Christopher Wallace, Jane Copple, Melissa McGlynn, Matt Folker, Nic Carter, Shannon Whittaker, Max Hagan, Natalie Lane, Zack Schlag, Howard Messick, Zac Ryan, Kendall Davis, Nevin Dawson, Brian Whitaker, Doug Porter, Marcia Gilliam, Mallory Westlund, Kathy Jones, David Ryan, Brian Whitaker, Gil Rambach, Connor Christopher, Haley Melton, Robbie Spray and Troy Strootmam.

The show runs for three weekends, with performances on Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm and Sundays at 3pm, April 27-May 13. Come on opening night to sample some of Mrs. Lovett’s meat pies, for sale at the concession stand!

Sweeney Todd is sponsored in part by The Hedgelawn Foundation.

Tickets are $20 general admission, $15 for military/seniors 65+ and $10 for students. They are available online at www.garfieldcenter.org or by calling the Garfield Center box office at 410-810-2060. The Garfield Center for the Arts is located at 210 High Street in Chestertown.

Chester River Chorale’s Spring Concert April 12 and 13

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“Leaves of Bluegrass,” the Chester River Chorale’s 19th annual spring concert, salutes American poets like Walt Whitman and Langston Hughes and presents the Eastern Shore premier of Mortals and Angels, a cantata-length Te Deum written in bluegrass style and backed by the High and Wides string bluegrass band. The performances by the 95-voice chorus are at 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, April 12th and 13th, at the Chestertown Baptist Church on Morgnec Road. Save the dates!

“Poughkeepsie Playlist” at The Mainstay on March 25

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Fast and furious fiddlers’ delights, from Appalachia to Ireland and mountains to hollers, will be on the bill when Poughkeepsie Playlist comes to The Mainstay on Sunday, March 25.  What could be more fun on a Sunday afternoon than Whiskey Before Breakfast and Hangman’s Reel tossed out as ear candy by four terrific musicians?

Andrea Velasquez, Rachel Conklin, Michael Champagne and Stephen Minor are superb National Music Festival alums who’ll leave Bach at home when they pack up fiddles and guitars and head for Rock Hall.  This toe-tapping, hand-clapping gig will be an early spring change of pace for the NMF’s Resonance concert series, just two months before the two-week classical festival begins in June.

Poughkeepsie Playlist features (l-r) Stephen Minor, Michael Champagne, Andrea Velasquez and Rachel Conklin.

It’ll be one fiddler’s amuse bouche after another at The Mainstay, from reels to polkas and great old tunes that inevitably sound familiar.  NMF Music Director Richard Rosenberg describes the Poughkeepsie Playlist foursome is “an eccentric string band with a classical flair.”

The names of the pieces in their repertoire are almost as wonderful as the music itself:  Soldier’s Joy, Catharsis, Ashoken Farewell, Off She Goes, Black Velvet Walk and Crested Hens.

If you haven’t heard Limerock in a long time (or ever), you might listen to someone play it on YouTube now, then nab a ticket for the March 25th show.  When you hear the classically trained masters play it live at The Mainstay, it’ll be a performance you won’t soon forget.  Lots of folks in the audience will scoot to the edge of their chairs as the pitch rises and the tempo quickens, when it’s hard to believe those fingers and bows can fly any faster.

Fiddling like that is the best kind of contest, where the music is great and everyone’s rooting for a tie!  And in the end, as the last notes soar, the room will explode with crowd-pleasing joy.

Single tickets are $20 and can be purchased online or at the door; children and students are $5 at the door. For ticket information, go to http://nationalmusic.us/events-and-tickets/single-concert-tickets/.

Maxine Thevenot Organ Concert at Emmanuel Church March 16

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Organist Maxine Thévenot will be having an organ concert on Friday, March 16, 2018 at Emmanuel Church, Chestertown, 7:30 p.m.

Acclaimed for her “solid musicianship … technical security and poise” by The American Organist,  Maxine Thévenot is among the foremost artists of her generation, hailed across North America and Europe for her skillful, musical playing and inventive programming.

Dr. Thévenot has been a featured performer and lecturer at national and regional conventions of the American Guild of Organists and the Royal Canadian College of Organists.  Winner of the 2000 Canada Bach National Organ Competition, Maxine has also broadcast for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, National Public Radio and Pipedreams.

Ms. Thévenot’s recital career has taken her to many major European venues and to venues across North America including Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C.; and St. Thomas Fifth Avenue, New York. She recently performed the 50th anniversary concert on the Walter Sr. Holtkamp organ at the University of New Mexico’s Keller Hall.  She served as a traveling clinician for the Royal Canadian College of Organists and in June 2017 was a featured performer at the Dallas AGO Regional Convention.

Dr. Thévenot currently serves as Director of Cathedral Music and Organist at the Cathedral of St. John, Albuquerque where she oversees a program consisting of 4 choirs and an extensive community outreach ministry-Friends of Cathedral Music,  now in its 24th season.  Under her direction, the Cathedral Choir and Choristers has sung residencies at Washington National Cathedral (2016); week-long residencies at both Winchester Cathedral and Westminster Abbey (2014) having previously sung under her direction in 2010 at Southwark Cathedral, St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, and York Minster.

Maxine Thévenot is Founding and Artistic Director of Polyphony: Voices of New Mexico, the state’s first professional, resident vocal ensemble; a faculty member at the University of New Mexico, where she directs the state’s only collegiate all-women’s choir, Las Cantantes.  A member of the duo, Air & Hammers, she concertizes with her husband, acclaimed English baritone Edmund Connolly, specializing in programs which combine song repertoire from the 19th and 20th centuries with new works by living composers.

A native of Saskatchewan, Canada, Canon Dr. Thévenot received her Bachelor’s Degree in Music Education from the University of Saskatchewan (with Distinction), and her Master of Music and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees from Manhattan School of Music.  At Manhattan School she was twice-awarded the Bronson Ragan Award for “Most Outstanding Organist”. Maxine is an Associate of the Royal

Canadian College of Organists and the Royal Conservatory of Music, Toronto, and was made an Honorary Fellow of the National College of Music, London, UK in 2006 for her “services to music.”

Tickets $20 at the door ($5 for students). For more Info call Emmanuel Church, 101 N. Cross St. Tel:  410-778-3477