Kids Grieve Too: Talbot Kids Grief Camp with Becky DeMattia

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When Chestertown’s Becky DeMattia, Talbot Hospice’s bereavement coordinator, talks about providing support for children who grieve, it might seem odd at first to hear her talk about interjecting fun as part of that effort. But as you begin to understand that kids work through bereavement very differently from adults,  it becomes much more clear how important a camp environment might be for a child struggling with the loss of a parent or another loved one.

As Becky tells us in our Spy interview, this is the reason that Talbot Hospice has just started Talbot Kids Grief Camp. This special children’s bereavement camp is designed for any youth, ages 6-12, who have experienced that kind of loss. This two-day camp will be held May 18-19, 2019, at the Talbot County Agricultural Center, and there is space for 35 participants. Each child attends the camp at no cost, to learn how to cope with the complex feelings of grief.

The goal is to provide an opportunity for children to process their losses in a healthy, peer supported environment via a curriculum of activities and therapeutic practices designed to teach children about themselves, and the grief they are experiencing. Together campers will discover ways to cope, realize they are a valuable member of the group and work together to overcome challenges ahead. The camp will also provide grief education, support, and resources to parents and families and help strengthen the family unit as they process the loss together.

We spent some time with Becky at the Hospice office in Easton last week.

For more information about Talbot Kids Grief Camp please contact Becky DeMattia at 410-822-6681 or bdemattia@talbothospice.org.

 

A Film Teaser by Kurt Kolaja for Those Wild Horses of Chincoteague

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As readers of the Spy know, we have a special affection for the masterful short teaser films that encourage attendance to film festivals as well as other special screenings of independent film.  Sadly, these sometimes work of shear genius are rarely acknowledged enough.

One of the most recent came to the Spy’s attention by local filmmaker Kurt Kolaja to drum up viewership for the upcoming broadcast on MTV of his speciatalor documentary The Wild Ponies of Chincoteague for Chesapeake Bay Week on April 22.

For more information please go here.

After the First Decade: Piazza’s Emily Chandler Looks Back and Forward

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As the Spy celebrates its own tenth year of operation, it dawned on us that there were quite a number of businesses on the Mid-Shore that started at the same time the Spy began publishing.  Ranging from bakeries to contractors, dozens of small businesses opened their doors amid a significant economic recession, relying on instinct and self-confidence that their services would be sought after, no matter the current business climate.

With that in mind, the Spy has decided to interview many of these brave entrepreneurs over the next year for them to reflect on their experiences.

We start with Emily Chandler, the owner of the now extremely popular Piazza Italian Market, in Easton.

This video is approximately four minutes in length. For more information about Piazza please go here.

 

Publisher Notes: The Spy Welcomes Columnist Angela Rieck

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Adding to our roster of Spy columnists, we are pleased to welcome Angela Rieck as she begins her weekly column in both the Chestertown Spy and Talbot Spy today.

Dr. Rieck offers our Mid-Shore readers a unique perspective as a native of Caroline County and her professional life the led to her work at the prestigious Bell labs and other high tech companies after receiving her Ph.D. in Mathematical Psychology from the University of Maryland.

Now retired in St. Michaels (and periodically Key West), Angela has reconnected with her Eastern Shore roots as she combines her sense of place, a love of analysis, and an uncommon literary sensibility for a mathematician in her writing. All of which makes her point of view a perfect fit with the Spy’s ongoing quest for thoughtful commentary on our world on the Eastern Shore and beyond.

Angela’s column will be published every Thursday.

Senior Nation: Ask Irma on Leaving Independent Living Too Soon

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Senior Nation is committed to offering resources to help us deal with the challenges and opportunities of aging. To that end, we are launching a new monthly video blog called “Ask Irma” hosted by Irma Toce, C.E.O. of the Londonderry on the Tred Avon in Easton, where we will be exploring on all topics related to aging.

This month: Prematurely leaving independent living and the challenges of falling.

This video is approximately one minute in length. For information about Londonderry on the Tred Avon please go here

At the Academy: Dressed to Kill

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It will be a shock to most visitors to the Academy Art Museum current exhibition entitled “Dressed to Kill” which features Roman, Greek, and Hellenistic jewelry, helmets, vessels that are nearly 2000-year old, how remarkably contemporary much of it looks in 2019. With stunning examples of earrings, bracelets, and other fine jewelry, it is hard not to assume that these same objects might feel right at home at the AAM’s annual craft fair rather that centuries-old artifacts.

But, of course, that’s what the Academy’s director Ben Simons and curator Anke Van Wagenberg wanted the Museum’s guests to experience when they asked Guest Curator Sarah Cox to organize the exhibition.

The Spy talked to Ben and Anke a few weeks ago about the exhibition.

This video is approximately two minutes in length. For more information about the Academy Art Museum please go here

Mid-Shore Education: Ben Dize Reflects on 50 Years of Teaching

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While undoubtedly many teachers on the Mid-Shore have celebrated 50 years or more in educating our young people in the region, it is hard to imagine for more a diverse background than Ben Dize.

Ben has had the unique experience of teaching in the Kent County Public Schools system for 30 years,  and then immediately followed that up with now 20 years at the Gunston School outside of Centreville. All in the field of art education.

During those five decades, Ben has been a careful observer of the benefits and sometimes challenges that come with both public and private education, but even more so with the impact that art education has on young people.

The Spy drove over to Gunston a few weeks ago to spend a few moments with Ben to record his reflections on education and his love of teaching.

This video is approximately three minutes in length. For more information about the Gunston School please go here

ESLC’s Darius Johnson Would Like Your Attention on Bay Bridge Traffic Solutions

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While the Mid-Shore has been fixated on issues related to a third Chesapeake Bay bridge possibly landing in their backyard, The Eastern Shore Land Conservancy’s Darius Johnson would politely suggest that the region turn its focus on the problems that exist now with bridge traffic and the real consequences for our communities along Route 50.

As the recently hired project director with ESLC, Johnson has been tasked with managing one of the organization’s oldest traditions; its annual planning conference, now in its 19th year. And the one day program, suitably named “ReRouting,” will place most of the attention on “here and now” traffic and transportation challenges.  How appropriate it that it will be held at the base of Chesapeake Bay Bridge to the The Chesapeake Bay Beach Club.

The Spy caught up with Darius at the Eastern Shore Conservation Center last week to chat about the conference.

This video is approximately two minutes in length. For more information about the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy’s ReRouting Conference on April 18 please go here.

 

 

 

 

Mid-Shore Health: Compass Regional Hospice Adds Palliative Care

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Since 1985, Compass Regional Hospice has been serving the Mid-Shore of Maryland with perhaps one of the most challenging moments for human beings; the management of the end of one’s life.

Through their extensive coverage in Caroline, Kent, and Queen Anne’s Counties, Compass has developed a well-deserved reputation for exceptional in-patient care for those in need as well as an extensive commitment to in-home support for those with a life expectancy of six months or less.

But like any institution with a special mission, the board and staff of Compass knew that something important was missing from their long list of services. A few years ago, after an extensive strategic planning process, the organization concluded that to serve their communities, a palliative care program must also be added.

Palliative care is entirely different from hospice care. It is an interdisciplinary approach to care for people with life-limiting illnesses rather than a terminal condition. Those benefiting from this specialized approach are provided relief from the symptoms, pain, physical stress, and mental stress at any stage of a chronic illness with remarkable improvements in quality of life.

To understand more about the significant change at Compass, the Spy sat down with Compass’s executive director, Heather Guerieri and the organized newly appointed medical director, to understand what this means for the communities they serve.

This video is approximately eight minutes in length. For more information about Compass Regional Hospice please go here.

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