Spy House of the Week: Mill Street Marvelous

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The 1730 plat of Chestertown showed a grid of streets that created 100 lots with Mill Street in the middle of the grid. The homes date from the mid 19th century including this Folk Victorian that has been lovingly maintained. The three bay front elevation with its light blue siding, yellow shutters, white trim and the Victorian details of brackets and fretwork gave it great curb appeal. The porch spanned across the front of the house and opened to the side to maximize the seating area.

As an architect, I also enjoy interior design and this house’s interiors were equally as appealing as the exterior. The focal point of the living room was the fireplace and chimney set slightly forward of the millwork on either side. In the center of each floor to ceiling millwork was an arched opening with shelving. The bright blue background of the arched openings complemented the colorful artwork over the fireplace and enhanced this room’s personality.

The dining room walls had a white wainscot below soft sage-green walls above.  A large multi-colored circular braided rug anchored the round table centered in the middle of the room opposite another fireplace. The dark wood of the table and chairs, the painted sideboard and the wood chest, lamps for accent lighting and the crystal chandelier above the table created a delightful eclectic look to enjoy as one lingered over dinner.

The wainscot and sage green walls continued into the adjacent kitchen. I loved how the kitchen kept period details during its upgrade. The mix of open shelving and closed upper cabinets, the period hardware, “subway” tile backsplash between the white craftsman styled cabinets, granite counter and the pot rack over the kitchen window made this cook want to find an apron and get to work. Opposite the “L” shaped work area was a wood free-standing piece of furniture with a deep top that became an island with room for three chairs.  The wall between the kitchen and dining room had another fireplace but the firebox opening was filled in with a mural. Instead of a mantel, a curlicued metal rack held colorful ceramic pieces. Next to the fireplace a pantry was partially hidden by doors with sheer fabric panels. A wonderful room!

The master suite with its warm light blue walls, white bed linens and antique armoire would be a restful retreat after a soak in the extra-long deep craw foot tub. Another bedroom had deeper sage green walls, and a wedding-ring quilt over the white bed linens.

Another porch spanned the rear of the house and was divided into an open area and a screened area. The rear yard was a verdant oasis of shade trees, crape myrtle, and a hardscaped area laid in brick with a table and chairs for al-fresco dining. Plantings were carefully planned and selected for low-maintenance that would bloom through spring, summer and fall.  There was also a firepit for cool fall evenings.  A charming shed was at the rear of the lot for storage or studio use.

A historic home whose details were carefully restored like the refinished heart pine flooring, moldings, built-ins, charming interior design and an urban garden in the middle of Town-who could resist?

 

For more information about this property, contact Liddy Campbell with Cross Street Realtors at410-778-3779 (o), 410-708-5433 (c) or liddy@screaltors.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

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