Lost History: Frederick Douglass in Cambridge on September 21

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In recognition of the lost Eastern Shore history of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass, a special historic announcement will be made on the evening of Friday, September 21 at 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm, at the Harriet Tubman Museum and Educational Center in Downtown Cambridge.

With the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial being celebrated and recognized throughout the country, and world, the local impact and significance of his consequential life can often be overlooked. Local historians in identifying new evidence of Douglass’ impact on communities of the Eastern Shore are forthrightly sharing it with communities in which the history belongs.

The subject of biographies and focus of manuscripts for generations, including Young Frederick Douglass: The Maryland Years by Eastern Shore historian Dickson J. Preston, the fuller and more complete story of Dr. Douglass on the Shore has yet to be told.

Join local historians and community leaders for an announcement and presentation detailing previously unknown high-profile visits Dr. Douglass made to Cambridge, Maryland while serving as Marshal of the District of Columbia.

Following the presentation will be an open community conversation.

Featured Presenters

William Jarmon is a native of Dorchester County and retired Principal in the Prince George’s County School System. Mr. Jarmon is a past president of the Dorchester County Historical Society and current docent with the Harriet Tubman Organization in Downtown Cambridge.

Linda Duyer is a local Eastern Shore historian and author of Round the Pond, the Georgetown Neighborhood of Salisbury, Maryland (2007) and Mob Law on Delmarva (2014). Duyer is responsible for several groundbreaking research projects and publications. She is a frequent contributor to local media.

John Muller is the author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C: The Lion of Anacostia (2012) and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent (2013) and is at work on Lost History: Frederick Douglass and Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Invited Elected Officials, Community Leaders and Organizations

Invitations have been extended to Cambridge Mayor Victoria Jackson-Stanley, members of the Cambridge City Council, faith leaders of Bethel AME Church and Waugh Chapel United Methodist Church, Dorchester County Historical Society, Maryland Commission on African-American History and Culture, Talbot County Department of Economic Development and Tourism, Chesapeake Kinfolk Genealogy and Enrichment Services, Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, Howard University’s Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, University of Maryland-College Park, Salisbury University’s Edward H. Nabb Research Center, Dean of the Frederick Douglass Library at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, Maryland Humanities Council,  National Museum of African-American History and Culture, Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, coaches, players, volunteers and parents of the Anacostia Steelers, representatives of Old Anacostia Douglassonians, members of the Douglass / Bailey Family and others.

Harriet Tubman Museum & Education Center

The Harriet Tubman Museum and Education Center was started in the 1980s. Today it is run by dedicated local volunteers who actively share Harriet Tubman’s story and preserve her legacy. The Harriet Tubman Museum offers exhibits and a short film about Tubman’s life, as well as a resource area with books and related materials.

Please call ahead to arrange a group tour. The museum can organize tours of the area where Tubman lived and toiled. The museum is usually open Tuesday – Friday 12:00 – 3:00 PM and Saturday 12:00 – 4:00 PM. Admission is free; donations are welcome.

RSVPs are encouraged but not necessary. Please RSVP to HarrietTubman@verizon.net

For more information call 410.228.0401 or visit:

https://visitdorchester.org/harriet-tubman-museum-educational-center/

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