Kent School Student Named National Geographic State Bee Semifinalist

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Flynn Bowman, and eighth grade student at Kent School, has been notified by the National Geographic Society that he is one of the semifinalists eligible to compete in the 2018 Maryland National Geographic State Bee. The contest will be held at Maryland Public Television Studios in Owings Mills on Friday, April 6, 2018.

Kent School’s school level bee was held on January 12 with 16 participants from grades 4-8. After several rounds of questions on national and international geography, Flynn emerged the winner. School geography bee coordinator and seventh grade geography teacher, Michelle Cerino said, “We are so proud of Flynn. Flynn works hard and is always prepared for the task at hand. It is gratifying to see his hard work rewarded on larger stage.” Nancy Mugele, Head of Kent School said, “Flynn always represents Kent School at a very high level. I have no doubt he will make us proud as he competes on April 6.” Mugele continued, “Kent School has a solid track record of students who qualify to compete in the Maryland State Geo Bee. This affirms our mission to offer our students a global curriculum starting with our youngest students that includes geography, art, music, foreign language and social studies.”

For more information about Kent School visit www.kentschool.org, email tcammerzell@kentschool.org or call 410-778-4100 ext. 110. Kent School, located in historic Chestertown, MD is an independent day school serving boys and girls from Preschool through Grade 8. The School’s mission is to guide our students in realizing their potential for academic, artistic, athletic, and moral excellence. Our school’s family-oriented, supportive, student-centered environment fosters the growth of honorable, responsible citizens for our country and our diverse world.

This is the second level of the National Geographic Bee competition, which is now in its 30th year. School Bees were held in schools with fourth- through eighth-grade students throughout the state to determine each school champion. School champions then took a qualifying test, which they submitted to the National Geographic Society. The National Geographic Society has invited up to 100 of the top-scoring students in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Department of Defense Dependents Schools and U.S. territories to compete in the State Bees.

To celebrate the 30th annual National Geographic Bee, the cash prize for the top three students in each state has doubled. Each state champion will receive $200, the National Geographic Visual Atlas of the World, 2nd Edition and a trip to Washington, D.C., to represent their state in the National Geographic Bee Championship to be held at National Geographic Society headquarters, May 20-23, 2018. Students that come in second place will receive $150 and those that come in third will receive $100. The first-place national champion will receive a $50,000 college scholarship, a lifetime membership in the Society, including a subscription to National Geographic magazine, and an all-expenses-paid Lindblad expedition to the Galápagos Islands aboard the new National Geographic Endeavour ll. Travel for the trip is provided by Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic. Second- and third-place finishers will receive $25,000 and $10,000 college scholarships, respectively. Visit www.natgeobee.org for more information on the National Geographic Bee.

National Geographic will stream the final round of the National Geographic Bee Championship starting May 24, 2018, at www.natgeobee.org.

How would you fare as a National Geographic Bee contestant? At the school Bees this year, students had to answer questions like these:

1. The Appalachian Mountains run through which state—Georgia or Mississippi?
A. Georgia

2. The North Platte and South Platte Rivers meet in which state—New Mexico or Nebraska?
A. Nebraska

3. Which state straddles the Tropic of Cancer—Hawaii or Alaska?
A. Hawaii

4. Which form of mass production was used by Henry Ford to produce automobiles in large quantities in Detroit, Michigan—threshing machine or assembly line?
A. assembly line

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