First Friday: Celebrate International Game Week at the Library

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In Celebration of International Games Week: Join Us for Game Night at the Library!

On First Friday, November 3rd, 5-7 pm, the Kent County Public Library and the Chestertown Recreation Commission are joining forces to celebrate International Games Week.

From familiar favorites to more modern games, there will be something for everyone! Try a round of “Bring Your Own Book” (don’t worry – we’ll have plenty of books on hand!), collaborate with a team of fearless adventures to see if you can survive the “Forbidden Island,” enjoy a familiar favorite family game, play life-sized chess, and more! 

If you’re curious about role-playing games, you’ll have the chance to learn about collaborative storytelling, character creation, and other elements that make narrative games engaging and fun to play.

Bring your friends, drop by, play games, and have fun!

For more information, visit the library’s website or call 410.778.3636.

First Friday, November 3  |  5-7 pm

Kent County Public Library  |  Chestertown Branch, 408 High St.

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Love Quilting! At Kent Center, Oct. 28-29

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Geese Among the Lilies is the Olde Kent Quilters Guild 2017 raffle quilt. Based on a pattern by Minick & Simpson, the quilt is a tribute to the beauty of the Chesapeake Bay region. Proceeds benefit the guild’s community outreach programs, Deborah’s Angels and Hands of Time. Tickets for the raffle will be on sale, six for $5 or $1 each, at the guild’s upcoming Shore Love Quilting! Show & Market at the Kent Center.

The Olde Kent Quilters Guild will present their bi-annual Shore Love Quilting! Show & Market on Saturday, October 28, and Sunday, October 29, at the Kent Center, 215 Scheeler Road, Chestertown. Show hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is $8, children 12 and under free.

The guild’s members have spent the last two years lovingly and skillfully creating more than 80 quilts that exemplify both the art and the craft of quilting through a variety of styles and techniques, including work by each of the guild’s four “bees” or special interest groups. “We’re really looking forward to having our show at the Kent Center for the first time,” guild president Gail Newman noted. “Its light-filled banquet hall should really show off our quilts beautifully. Plus, there’s plenty of parking!”

Sisters Jean Anthony and Barbara “Bobbi” Pippin are this year’s featured quilters. Among their showcased quilts are several they both worked on as gifts to celebrate various family members’ milestones.

Community outreach is an important part of the guild’s programs throughout the year. Visitors to the show can learn more about both Deborah’s Angels, which has donated more than 2500 small quilts to sick and needy children since its inception in 2004, and Hands of Time, a partnership with the Kent County Detention Center begun in 2016. These programs are supported in large part by the proceeds from the guild’s annual raffle quilt. This year’s quilt, Geese Among the Lilies, is the guild’s interpretation of the Coastal Lilies pattern by Minick & Simpson. Tickets for the raffle will be on sale at the show, six for $5 or $1 each. There are second and third prizes as well, so each ticket has three chances to win. The winners’ names will be drawn at the guild’s final meeting of the year on November 8.

The Market is the perfect opportunity for the show’s visitors to start their holiday shopping, offering unique handcrafted items ranging from lap, throw and baby quilts to zip pouches, purses, table runners, and other small items. Visiting quilters will also find a rich assortment of books, patterns, fabrics and tools for sale.

On Sunday, Bob’s Sharpening Service will be on-site in the parking lot to provide on-the-spot sharpening for scissors, knives and pruners. The Smoke, Rattle & Roll food truck will also be there, offering a variety of delicious barbeque meals.

The Olde Kent Quilters Guild, founded in 1995, meets monthly from January through November at the Presbyterian Church of Chestertown. The guild’s activities include monthly programs and workshops with local, regional and nationally known speakers, special interest bees, community outreach programs, an annual exhibit of smaller quilts and a bi-annual show, road trips and shop hops, and two annual retreats. Quilters of all skill levels, including beginners, are welcome. For more information, contact Gail Newman at 410.490.7102.

 

Hogwarts for a Day!

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The 4th Annual Chestertown HP Festival kicked off Friday evening, Oct. 6 with a dance party in the Garfield Center, attended by more than 250 festival-goers. Based on the popular Harry Potter fantasy novels by J.K. Rowling, the festival drew attendees of all ages from the entire middle Atlantic region.

For the festival, High Street was closed from Queen to Spring streets, with various vendors and exhibits along the way. In Fountain Park, a number of vendors offered Harry Potter-related items — such as Meckley Brooms of Lancaster County, Pa., which brought a selection of authentic-looking witches’ brooms. Vicky Meckley, whose husband is among the fourth generation of broom makers, said the 120-year-old company has been to a number of Potter festivals over the last year and frequently sells out its stock. The company also produces brooms for everyday use. She and the other family members at the booth took turns walking around town and enjoying the historic district.

The park was the site of a number of festival events, including a “Defense Against the Dark Arts” display where participants created giant bubbles to represent their “patronus” or magical protector.   The costume contest was also held in the park.  At other points around the downtown area, events included a “Magical Hall of Talking Portraits” at Kidspot, a Charms Class at the Sultana Education Center and a showing of “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” at Kent County Public Library. Everywhere you went, there were people in Harry Potter-related  costumes, both young and old, dressed as wizards, goblins, and dozens of Harrys and Hermiones, .

Goblins and Galleons, The Goblin Bank

At Olivander’s Wand Shop, AKA Bob Ortiz Furniture Studio, wizards could purchase a variety of wands from five different vendors. Michael and Ramona Liles of Philadelphia, selling at the Vele Cruce table, said they were attending their first festival.

A popular feature was the scavenger hunt, in which participants visit businesses all over the downtown area searching for clues. Those who found all the clues and returned their form to the booth in front of the Garfield received a prize. Each of the participating businesses was renamed after an equivalent locale in the books — so that the former Chestertown Bank building, now the headquarters of KRM Development, became Goblins and Galleons, with a clue hidden in the old bank vault, and Book Plate became Flourish and Blotts Bookseller.

This year, there were enough successful participants that the festival had given out all its prizes by 3 p.m. — an hour before the official end of the hunt!

Wilmer Park was the setting for the Quidditch tournament — a team sport with similarities to soccer and basketball. There were several competing teams, from as far away as Philadelphia and Washington. The sport differs from the version in the Harry Potter books in that none of the players are flying on broomsticks — although they are required to carry a symbolic broomstick between their legs during play. There were a good number of spectators picnicking in shady spots around the park — with food provided by several vendor trucks, many of them local.

The Quidditch Goals – Three Rings

Stretching Before the Game

Quidditch

Hogwarts faculty members Professor Dumbledore (Jim Landskroener), Nearly Headless Nick (David Ryan) and Professor Lupin (Zac Ryan)

The Garfield also offered “The Hogwarts Experience,” a chance for young festival-goers ages 8-12 to take part in a re-enactment of one of the key elements of the Harry Potter world, the famous school of wizardry. In two different sessions, 40 participants entered the theater where they were greeted by Headmaster Dumbledore and a panel of wizards. Each came to the stage to be sorted by the traditional “sorting hat” into one of the four Hogwarts houses — Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw or Slytherin. They were then sent to tables where faculty members instructed them in magical arts, from the use of wands to cast spells to the detection of hidden properties of objects — such as the taste of different colors of jelly beans. The actors playing the faculty wizards gave enthusiastic performances, and the young students clearly enjoyed the experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In these “magic classes,” students get to take out their wands and practice repelling a “boggart,” a magical being who takes the form of your worst fear.  With courage and heart – and just the right magical words –  students learn to vanquish their own personal boggart, a handy skill to have.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The close of the festival was marked by another dance, the “Azkaban Prison Break Party.” named after the key event in the third of the Harry Potter novels.

All in all, it was another successful Festival.  This year the festival was re-titled The HP Festival because the organization had received complaints from Warner Brothers’ legal department. But that didn’t throw a blanket over the fun – the magic was definitely there for this year’s festival.

 

Dumbledore, Professor & Headmaster of Hogwarts (portrayed by Jim Landskroener)

Nearly Headless Nick (David Ryan)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Faculty of Hogwarts – Left to right: Professor Sprout- Madeline McSherry, Professor Trelawny – Amelia Markosian, Professor Dumbledore – Jim Landskroener, Nearly Headless Nick – David Ryan, Professor Lupin – Zac Ryan

A Goblin works at His Desk in the Bank

Merkley Brooms 

4th Annual HP Festival

Diagon Alley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagon Alley is the Wizarding World’s Shopping District that is magically concealed from muggles’ eyes in London and  in Chestertown is located in the Old Mill alley just off Cross St near the old train station.

The Evergrain bakery and coffee shop became Wizardgrain for the day. A wonderful place for young witches and wizards to introduce their parents to butterbeer and everlasting gobstoppers.

Choosing a wand at Olivanders (Bob Ortiz Studio)

4th Annual HP Festival

Goblin

 

 

 

 

A Family Plan by Nancy Mugele

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My iPhone ringer has been on 24-7 on its loudest setting for nearly two months and I have no intention of turning it down anytime soon. I thought as an empty-nester I would not need to have my phone near me at all times of day and night but I have since changed my mind. Adult children living in places near and far, or travelling to places near and far, feel secure knowing that the red roof inn is monitoring their whereabouts.

On August 11, my youngest left on a trip out west on a quest to find the best trout fishing in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and now, British Columbia. You can read about his adventures with his black lab Boh on his blog at thefishwhistler.com. My temporarily jobless, homeless son, who says he has never been happier writing and fishing, has been communicating more than normal – which I love – but it is always in the midnight to 2 a.m. time frame when his day out west is winding down and I am in bed. He told me he has been “finding out how much you really need, versus what you think you need.” An idealist and a realist all in one.

Last week my oldest, who believes in the power of experiences, used some vacation time from her job at UnderArmour to travel to Paris for sightseeing, Munich for Oktoberfest and Iceland for a day at the Blue Lagoon. Texts started at 4 a.m. Chestertown time as she began each day’s new adventure. Don’t get me wrong, I loved receiving the photos and messages, but coupled with a few 7:45 a.m. Kent School meetings, I have been especially exhausted for the past two weeks. Luckily, my middle daughter in Nashville is only an hour behind us and since she works at a school like me, she cannot travel in September, although she did get back on Eastern Standard Time this summer for a trip to Florida and two friends’ weddings. But, seriously, I can’t keep track of all the time zones my children are in!

Turn off your phone, you may say, but raising children post-9/11 required a different set of parenting skills than pre-9/11. Communication became the name of the game. We bought our oldest, whose birthday is 9/11 (and who was celebrating her “golden” birthday, turning 11 on 9/11), a cell phone immediately. As parents of a 6th grader in 2001, my husband and I would not have even thought about giving her a cell phone until the day the world stopped and that changed everything for us as parents. Suddenly, I had this intense need to be able to be in communication with my children at all times – especially as they traveled to other schools, towns, playing fields and ice rinks for athletics, or social events.

Parents in constant communication with their children got a bad rap as helicopter parents but truly I think it was purely about the communication – not the control. Parents need to hear their children’s voices especially when they are away from home, and especially in the world we live in which, all too often, it seems, experiences tragedies like terrorist attacks, the Las Vegas shootings, and natural disasters like Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria and the earthquake in Mexico. My heart aches for all those affected by all of the worst in nature and humanity these past few months.

And, while I don’t think that we should stop living our lives for fear of an attack or natural disaster, I believe we need to be intentional about two things – vigilance and communication. Any of my children could have been at the Jason Aldean concert – and in fact we all just saw him in Nashville at CMAFest. A co-worker just told me she is going to tell her older children to wear comfortable shoes when travelling or gathering in large groups of people so “you can be ready to run.” I am going to say this to mine as well. How sad that this is the world we now live in.

It seems to me that communication, above all else, is critical to our mental state. We have a primal need to let our loved ones know we are safe and to learn that they, too, are safe.  Now as our children live their lives in other parts of the country from home base, I greatly appreciate the cellphones we all carry. I know we constantly say that people are obsessed with their devices and social media, and we urge our friends to put their phone away. But I believe that being on our devices for connection to family and friends is important today for building and maintaining human relationships.

Yes, we still have a family plan with our cell provider and two of our three pay us monthly. (The fisherman has only a few more months with free cell service!) As well, the five of us have a family group text and at least once a day someone makes me smile and LOL across the miles. I will not turn off my phone and miss any of it!

Nancy Mugele is the Head of School at Kent School in Chestertown and a member of the Board of Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s. 

St. Martin’s Ministries Art Dinner Features Lighthouse Models

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One of the six lighthouses created by Dick Swanson to be auctioned off at this year’s St. Martin’s Ministries event.

“America the Beautiful, From Sea to Shining Sea” is the theme for this year’s 12th annual St. Martin’s Ministries’ Arts Dinner and Auction to be held on Friday, October 13, 2017 in the Chesapeake Room at the Rock Hall Firehouse.  This year’s event will include silent and live auction items donated by local artists and businesses that represent various regions of the United States.

Master craftsman Dick Swanson’s  Wood Lighthouse Series will take center stage at this year’s event as featured live auction items.  Representative of the evening’s theme, Swanson has chosen six American lighthouses, which once functioned as nautical landmarks in six different regions of the United States.  All still proudly standing guard over American’s vast network of waterways and coastlines. These are not your standard lighthouses that feature a tall white column with a light on top; these historic beacons each have their own particular personality.  Swanson’s unique creations are beautifully wrought in a variety of native woods and are truly one-of-a-kind treasures.

Dick Swanson was raised in New York state, in a furniture making family and trained early on in furniture and cabinetry making, though he became an electrical engineer by profession.  However, for the past 40 years he has continued his interest in furniture history, design and construction. Dick currently resides in Chestertown with his wife Nancy.

Swanson’s Wood Lighthouse Series will be on display at the Finishing Touch in Chestertown prior to the event.  Stop by and check out these unique pieces of art.  If you are interested in bidding on one or all of them and/or attending this year’s event you can visit www.smmartsevent.wordpress.com .

All proceeds benefit St. Martin’s Ministries.  St. Martin’s Ministries helps low income mid-shore families meet basic needs of food, clothing and housing.  In its 32nd year in Ridgely, Md. the Ministries is a non-denominational, non-profit organization.  Saint Martin’s House, a 2 year residential program, helps women and their children transition from homelessness to stability.  Saint Martin’s receives support from United Way and United Fund.   Numerous women and children in Kent County have benefited from the work of St. Martin’s Ministries.  For more information about St. Martin’s Ministries and this year’s Arts Auction visit www.stmartinsministries.org.

Mid-Shore Community Foundation Donates Over $70,800 to Camp Fairlee

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The Mid-Shore Community Foundation, in Easton, MD, recently donated over $70,800 to Easterseals CAMPaignFairlee, a $4.5M capital campaign to modernize and expand Easterseals Camp Fairlee in Chestertown. Camp Fairlee serves hundreds of Maryland families each year by providing a typical camp experience for children and adults with disabilities, while also providing respite to their families.

“Easterseals is overwhelmed with the generosity of the members of the Mid-Shore Community Foundation that donated to Easterseals CAMPaign Fairlee,” Easterseals President/CEO, Kenan Sklenar, says. “Funds donated helped to expand and modernize Easterseals Camp Fairlee and allow us to provide decades of memories to today’s and future campers.”

The Mid-Shore Community Foundation facilitated grants from its Arthur H. Kudner, Jr. Fund, Ferree Fund, Margaret Herring Fund, Reade W. and Mary P. Corr Fund, and Reynolds/Cristiano Fund for the $70,800 total.

Fairlee Manor is the home of Easterseals Camp Fairlee and the historic Fairlee Manor house. Every building (except the historic Manor House) has recently been replaced or remodeled for your comfort.

“We’ve made small grants to Easterseals for Camp Fairlee camperships for many years,” Mid-Shore Community Foundation’s Chief Program Officer, Robbin Hill, says. “We visited Camp Fairlee last fall and were very impressed with the updates Easterseals chose to make to the campus. We are honored to support the capital campaign for improvements that will enhance the camp experience for children and adults with disabilities well into the future.”

The Easterseals CAMPaign Fairlee project included the construction of a new activity center, health center, four residential cabins, the expansion of the dining hall, and upgrades to the roads and paths of Camp Fairlee. The camp offers campers of all abilities the opportunity for a safe and accessible camping experience year-round. Meanwhile, families enjoy peace of mind, an opportunity to rest and focus on relationships with spouses or other children, and experience activities that are out of reach in their daily lives.

The Mid-Shore Community Foundation is a 501(c)(3) public charity that connects private resources with public needs in order to enhance the quality of life throughout the Mid-Shore Region of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot Counties.

Easterseals Delaware & Maryland’s Eastern Shore offers a range of services, including children’s therapies, assistive technology, recreational camping, day programs for adults with physical or intellectual disabilities, and respite services for caregivers. To learn more about how Easterseals helps children and adults with disabilities, call 1-800-677-3800 or visit the Easterseals website.

Camp Fairlee

• Sits on 250 rural acres in historic Kent County, MD for a tranquil setting
• Seven modern cabins can accommodate about 140 people
• Food service/commercial kitchen/dining seating for up to 150
• Activity center with gymnasium

Camp Fairlee Activity Center

Camp Fairlee Outdoor Pavillion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

• Spacious outdoor pavilion with fireplace
• Nature trails
• Fully accessible
• Affordable; rent all or part of the facility
• Rental revenues support Camp Fairlee programs to benefit people with disabilities

Call (410) 778-0566 to get pricing for your event.
Download the flyer here.

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Harmony on High Street – Legacy Day 2017

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1923 Model T was the oldest car in Legacy Day 2017 parade.

Now in its fourth year, Legacy Day in Chestertown has become one of the town’s signature events. Organized by the Historical Society of Kent County with numerous local sponsors, this year’s Legacy Day honored African-American teachers and celebrated Kent County’s African-American history and culture.

Soulfied Village provided the music.

Saturday night, August 19, the block of High Street facing Fountain Park was closed to traffic – and open to dancing to the sounds of Soulfied Village, a nine-member Centreville-based band, and to records spun by DJ Stansbury.

Across the street from the park, the Kent County Historical Society’s Bordley Center was open for visitors to view displays honoring the African-American teachers and educators in the county’s schools during the segregation era. The exhibit will remain open for several weeks.  The window display alone is worth stopping by for.  Some thirty of the teachers and family members featured in the exhibit were in attendance – some from as far away as Georgia.

Retired music teacher Mary Clark (in yellow) sways with the music.

Saturday’s events began with a genealogy workshop, led by Jeanette Sherbondy and Amanda Tuttle-Smith of the Historical Society, at Kent County Public Library. A  luncheon for the teachers took place at Janes United Methodist Church, followed by a public concert by the men’s choir of Janes Church.

The evening’s Legacy Day celebration began with a parade down High Street. Lauretta Freeman, the Legacy Day Grand Marshal, led the parade in a vintage Buick convertible. The remainder of the teachers, appropriately riding in a school bus, followed close behind. They dismounted to take their place of honor opposite the bandstand.

Rev. Ellsworth Tolliver greets Grand Marshal Lauretta Freeman. Alan Johnson driving.

Master of Ceremonies, the Reverand Ellsworth Tolliver

Tolliver, himself a former teacher, announced each teacher’s name and subject or grade taught.  And each name was received with applause and cheers from the audience, many of whom remembered these teachers from their own school days.

As the rest of the parade rolled by, Tolliver introduced the various entries – from classic cars to marching units to dancing groups – with wit and style. And then Soulfied Village took over and the evening’s festivities began in earnest.

A number of service organizations were on hand to provide food and drinks for the large crowd.  Offerings included barbecue ribs, fried fish, hot dogs and hamburgers. The Historical Society teamed up with the Garfield Center for beer and wine sales.The Garfield Center for the Arts and the Kent County Democrats each had a booth.

Other venders were set up in Fountain Park, interspersed with families picnicking and enjoying the seasonable weather. The Kent County Democrats had a voter registration booth, and artists Alan Johnson and Samuel Moore had a joint exhibit. Other venders offered toys, jewelry, clothing – even cupcakes.

As with previous Legacy Day celebrations, the atmosphere was congenial and celebratory, which, a week after Charlottesville, gives hope for the future.   There were no disturbances.  The crowd, estimated at over a thousand, was diverse in all aspects – all races, all ages – from infants to grandparents, from all walks of life, some in jeans and t-shirts, some dressed up, all having a good time, dancing, talking, eating, and just enjoying the evening.

The festivities continued till 10 p.m., when the band concluded its last set and packed up just before a brief shower moved in.

Legacy Day 2017 was sponsored by the Historical Society of Kent County, in partnership with the Hedgelawn Foundation, Garfield Center for the Arts, C. V. Starr Center, Kent County Arts Council, and Music in the Park, a program of the Town of Chestertown, along with a host of other contributors.  Now we look forward to Legacy Day 2018!

Photo Gallery below.  Photography by Peter Heck and Jane Jewell

The school bus arrives carrying the teacher honorees, representatives, and family members.

The Parade

Buffalo Soldiers

Legacy Day 2017 – In the Park and on the Street

 Music All Evening

The twins go for a stroll.

Artists Alan Johnson and Samuel Moore display their work.

Dancin’ with Mom!

 

 

Special sun hat for cooking outside

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looking sharp!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Legacy Day: Honoring Our History and Our Teachers

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From 1966 Tiger Yearbook – From L-R, Top Row (across the two pages) Miss R. Johnson (English), Mrs. B. Jones (Reading), Mr. L. Moore (Instrumental Music), Mrs. M. Niskey (Mathematics, English), Second Row Miss M. Jordan (Grade 3), Miss J. Macklin (Business Education), Mrs. C. Potts (Grade 1), Miss G. Powell (Physical Education, Health) Third Row Miss C. Malloy (French), Mrs. M. McNair ( Science), Mrs. F. Rideout (Special Education), Miss B. Robinson (Business Education, English)

August 18 and 19, the Historical Society of Kent County presents its fourth annual Legacy Day celebration of “Community, History and Culture.”

This year’s celebration recognizes the role of African American education and teachers in Kent County before the schools were integrated in 1967. As part of the celebration, members of the Historical Society contacted as many of the former teachers as they could, compiling a fascinating narrative of the history of Kent County Education more than 50 years ago. The results of their research were the foundation for the Historical Society’s “History Happy Hour” on August 4, and are summarized in an article by Bill Leary, available at the Historical Society’s Bordley Center at the corner of High and Cross streets in Chestertown.  Come by and pick one up during Legacy Day.

Eloise Johnson – Maryland State Teacher of the Year in 1974

The article goes well back into the early days of African American schools in the county, which were established in 1872, in response to a state law passed earlier that year. There were originally five schools for black children; however, as Leary notes, the black community had established a number of private schools before that date. By 1930, there were 22 schools for black students, many of them one- or two-room schools without plumbing or electricity. In 1916, the original Garnet Elementary School opened on College Avenue in Chestertown, across from Bethel A.M.E. Church. It became Garnet High School in 1923.  In 1950, a new building was constructed across the street,  next to Bethel Church, and was Kent County’s only African American high school until 1967, when all schools were integrated.  Garnet then became an integrated elementary school while both black and white students attended Chestertown High School.

Legendary Garnet principal Elmer T. Hawkins set the tone for education in the black community. Hawkins, a graduate of Morgan State College, served as Garnet’s principal for 41 of the 44 years that the building served as the high school for Kent County’s African-American students.  After integration in 1967, he served as the principal of the integrated Chestertown Middle School until his death in 1973.

Leary’s article drew on interviews from a number of retired teachers and their students and families to give a detailed picture of the place of the schools in the black community during the segregation era. Many of those teachers have agreed to return, several from as far away as Georgia, to take part in this year’s Legacy Day commemoration, which will include a reception honoring their contributions at Sumner Hall at 7 p.m. Friday, August 18.

Lauretta Freeman – 2017 Legacy Day Grand Marshall

The teachers will also ride in the Legacy Day parade at 5 p.m. Saturday, traveling a route from the Dixon Valve parking lot to Fountain Park, where the main celebration, including a concert and street dance, will take place. One of the teachers, Lauretta Freeman, grand marshal of the parade, is quoted widely in Leary’s article.

Master of Ceremonies for Legacy Day is Rev. Ellsworth Tolliver. Live music will be provided by Soulfied Village, with local band members Devone “Tweety” Comegys and Courtney McCloria Parson. Soulfied Village features songs of the Motown Era. T music begins at 6 p.m. and there will be a DJ during band breaks to ensure continuous music. Dancing in the streets is encouraged! Or bring a lawn chair and sit back and enjoy the festivities. High Street will be closed off between Cross and Spring Streets, and there will be vendors offering food and drinks, including a beer truck sponsored by the Historical Society.

There will be two additional Legacy Day activities earlier Saturday. A genealogy workshop at Kent County Public Library at 10 a.m. will give anyone interested in tracing family history the tools for doing their own research. The workshop will be conducted by Jeanette Sherbondy and Amanda Tuttle-Smith of the Historical Society. The workshop, like all Legacy Day activities, is free and open to all.

 

Elementary and high school teachers from 1953/54 school year. Garnet High School Principal Elmer T. Hawkins on right end of the first row

Saturday afternoon, at Janes United Methodist Church, on the corner of Cross and Cannon streets, there will be a concert by the Men’s Choir of Janes Church, honoring the African American teachers in song. The concert is from 1 to 3 p.m.

During the Legacy Day activities, the Bordley Center – on High Street at the intersection with Cross Street – will be open for visitors to view the displays created by the Historical Society. There will also be a silent auction with proceeds benefitting the Historical Society’s Legacy Day fund.

In just four years, Legacy Day has become one of Chestertown’s most popular events, attracting visitors – many of whom are returning home to honor their community’s history and culture – from the entire region. Add on the chance to dance away a summer night to live music, and you’ve got a sure-fire way to enjoy an evening.

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Friends & Family Camp this Weekend at Pecometh, July 28-30

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Have you ever wished that you could come to camp and have the same fun as the children? Have you longed to come to Camp Pecometh and experience the same fun you had as a child? Friends & Family Camp is the opportunity for everyone to experience the fun of camp in a weekend no matter how young or young-at-heart.  This year “Friends and Family Camp” will be held Friday to Sunday, July 28-30.

Enjoy time in the Chester River kayaking or splashing around on our Splashdown equipment.  Relax with a s’more by the campfire or work on that long awaited scrapbook. Choose to tent camp or stay in either our traditional cabins or hotel-style lodges. Experience the fun, fellowship, and festivities of a weekend at camp! (Parents are responsible for their own children at all times throughout the weekend)

Friends & Family Camp is run by the Camp Pecometh Staff Alumni Association.

Click here for photos from this year’s friends and family camp!

Rates
*All rates include two nights accommodation, all program activities, and meals from Friday dinner through Sunday lunch. 

Camp Site (Tent or RV Camping) 
Adults (each) $95
Children Ages 6-11 (per child for the 1st and 2nd child) $79
Additional Children Ages 6-11 (per child) $50
Children Under 5 Years Old FREE
Rustic Cabins
Adults (each) $109
Children Ages 6-11 (per child for the 1st and 2nd child) $95
Additional Children Ages 6-11 (per child) $50
Children Under 5 Years Old FREE
Hotel Style Rooms in the Riverview Retreat Center 
Adults (each) $199
Children Ages 6-11 (per child for the 1st and 2nd child) $99
Additional Children Ages 6-11 (per child) $50
Children Under 5 Years Old FREE