Harmony on High Street – Legacy Day 2017

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1923 Model T was the oldest car in Legacy Day 2017 parade.

Now in its fourth year, Legacy Day in Chestertown has become one of the town’s signature events. Organized by the Historical Society of Kent County with numerous local sponsors, this year’s Legacy Day honored African-American teachers and celebrated Kent County’s African-American history and culture.

Soulfied Village provided the music.

Saturday night, August 19, the block of High Street facing Fountain Park was closed to traffic – and open to dancing to the sounds of Soulfied Village, a nine-member Centreville-based band, and to records spun by DJ Stansbury.

Across the street from the park, the Kent County Historical Society’s Bordley Center was open for visitors to view displays honoring the African-American teachers and educators in the county’s schools during the segregation era. The exhibit will remain open for several weeks.  The window display alone is worth stopping by for.  Some thirty of the teachers and family members featured in the exhibit were in attendance – some from as far away as Georgia.

Retired music teacher Mary Clark (in yellow) sways with the music.

Saturday’s events began with a genealogy workshop, led by Jeanette Sherbondy and Amanda Tuttle-Smith of the Historical Society, at Kent County Public Library. A  luncheon for the teachers took place at Janes United Methodist Church, followed by a public concert by the men’s choir of Janes Church.

The evening’s Legacy Day celebration began with a parade down High Street. Lauretta Freeman, the Legacy Day Grand Marshal, led the parade in a vintage Buick convertible. The remainder of the teachers, appropriately riding in a school bus, followed close behind. They dismounted to take their place of honor opposite the bandstand.

Rev. Ellsworth Tolliver greets Grand Marshal Lauretta Freeman. Alan Johnson driving.

Tolliver, himself a former teacher, announced each teacher’s name and subject or grade taught.  And each name was received with applause and cheers from the audience, many of whom remembered these teachers from their own school days.

As the rest of the parade rolled by, Tolliver introduced the various entries – from classic cars to marching units to dancing groups – with wit and style. And then Soulfied Village took over and the evening’s festivities began in earnest.

A number of service organizations were on hand to provide food and drinks for the large crowd.  Offerings included barbecue ribs, fried fish, hot dogs and hamburgers. The Historical Society teamed up with the Garfield Center for beer and wine sales.The Garfield Center for the Arts and the Kent County Democrats each had a booth.

Other venders were set up in Fountain Park, interspersed with families picnicking and enjoying the seasonable weather. The Kent County Democrats had a voter registration booth, and artists Alan Johnson and Samuel Moore had a joint exhibit. Other venders offered toys, jewelry, clothing – even cupcakes.

As with previous Legacy Day celebrations, the atmosphere was congenial and celebratory, which, a week after Charlottesville, gives hope for the future.   There were no disturbances.  The crowd, estimated at over a thousand, was diverse in all aspects – all races, all ages – from infants to grandparents, from all walks of life, some in jeans and t-shirts, some dressed up, all having a good time, dancing, talking, eating, and just enjoying the evening.

The festivities continued till 10 p.m., when the band concluded its last set and packed up just before a brief shower moved in.

Legacy Day 2017 was sponsored by the Historical Society of Kent County, in partnership with the Hedgelawn Foundation, Garfield Center for the Arts, C. V. Starr Center, Kent County Arts Council, and Music in the Park, a program of the Town of Chestertown, along with a host of other contributors.  Now we look forward to Legacy Day 2018!

Photo Gallery below.  Photography by Peter Heck and Jane Jewell

The school bus arrives carrying the teacher honorees, representatives, and family members.

The Parade

Buffalo Soldiers

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kent County Public Library Exhibit on Anniversary of ADA

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Kent County Public Library front entrance – Chestertown Branch

In celebration of the 27th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Maryland Department of Disabilities (MDOD) has been hosting a traveling disAbility History Tour throughout Maryland.  The tour wraps up with a final exhibit at Kent County Public Library’s Chestertown Branch August 22-26.

Advocacy: A History of People Speaking Up for Themselves is on loan from the Museum of disAbility History, which is dedicated to advancing the understanding, acceptance, and independence of people with disabilities. The Advocacy display traces the advocacy movement from early educational facilities to the development of organizations established for and by individuals with disabilities. In addition to the loaned panels, the MDOD will add a fifth display designed by the Maryland Association of Centers for Independent Living outlining disability history in Maryland.

On Wednesday, August 23, the public is invited to a reception and resource fair at Kent County Public Library where they can view the exhibit, learn about local organizations that support individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and enjoy light snacks, including cookies provided by Kent House Kitchen.  The reception begins at 5:30 pm and will be followed by a special film showing at 6:45 pm.

For more information about the event, visit the Kent County Library website or call 410-778-3636.

For more information about the exhibit or to view images of the panels, ASL translation, audio files, text only, text image descriptions, and large print versions of the displays, visit the Maryland Department of Disabilities website ADA 27 event page.

Blue Heron Cafe to Close

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The Blue Heron Cafe at 236 Cannon St. will be changing hands.

Owner Paul Hanley, in a FaceBook post Aug. 14, wrote:

Dear Friends and Family,

I want to bypass the rumor-mill so that you can hear it directly from me. After 20 years of building friendships and memories, Blue Heron Cafe will be closing in late October.

In late June, I received an offer to purchase my building and business – my beloved Blue Heron Café. It was the offer I had hoped would come one day. I had wished for it to happen five years from now, but it came this year and I accepted. The offer was a solid, generous one that I could not refuse.

To all my current and former staff: Thank you for making my life dream, of owning my own restaurant, come true. You are the best of the best.

To my kitchen staff and, especially Chef Eugene Bethel: I’d be nothing without your talent and pure dedication. You’re as close to my heart as family.

To our patrons, guests, friends, and neighbors: Thank you for allowing us into your lives. We’ve celebrated birthdays, anniversaries, engagements, weddings, business meetings, and so many other fun times and memories. I’ve watched your toddlers grow up and graduate. We’ve talked food, business, politics, cars, boats, airplanes, grandchildren, fishing and pets – all while enjoying the culinary art of casual fine dining. I am so grateful for your two decades of loyal support.

We will still be here for another few months. So come on over, say hi, and get a last round of our famous Sweetbreads, Oyster Fritters, Filet Mignon, Lamb Chops, Crab Cakes, Soft Shells, Double Duck, and all the rest.

 

 

Profiles in Spirituality: Unitarian Universalism with the Mid-Shore’s Reverend Sue Browning

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According to the Unitarian Universalist Association’s own data, the U.U. Church currently has just under 200,000 members in the entire United States, and about two hundred of them attend church in Kent County or Talbot County on any given Sunday.

In comparison, the Episcopal Church, another relatively small denomination, has about 3,500 active members in the same region, while the Catholic faith comes close to having 7,000 adherents.

These numbers may suggest that the Unitarians represent a tiny part of the religious fabric on the Delmarva, but those statistics do not account for the extremely high level of activism these small congregations — one in Kent and the other Talbot County — participate in during the year in their communities. In fact, when one factors in contributions that the U.U. Church make locally in such critical areas of concern for social justice, immigration, and the environment, one then can one see the full impact of the Unitarian Universalists on the Mid-Shore.

And one person who sees that impact on an almost daily basis is the Reverend Sue Browning, who is in the unique role of being the minister of both the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship at Easton as well as the Unitarian Universalists of the Chester River in Kent County.

The Spy sat down with Rev. Browning to talk a bit about Unitarian Universalism as a faith, which is liberal by nature and characterized by a “free and responsible search for truth and meaning.” In other words, Unitarian Universalist members do not accept a creed per se but are unified by a shared search for spiritual growth.

We also talked to Sue about the important role that faith, unconventional as it may be in the U.U. Church, plays in the life of its members, the spiritual dimensions of aging, and the need to exercise one’s compassion and gratitude like a muscle which will only gets stronger with time.

This video is approximately four minutes in length. For more information about the Mid-Shore Unitarian Universalist Churches, please go here for Chestertown and here for Easton

 

 

 

Legacy Day: Honoring Our History and Our Teachers

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From 1966 Tiger Yearbook – From L-R, Top Row (across the two pages) Miss R. Johnson (English), Mrs. B. Jones (Reading), Mr. L. Moore (Instrumental Music), Mrs. M. Niskey (Mathematics, English), Second Row Miss M. Jordan (Grade 3), Miss J. Macklin (Business Education), Mrs. C. Potts (Grade 1), Miss G. Powell (Physical Education, Health) Third Row Miss C. Malloy (French), Mrs. M. McNair ( Science), Mrs. F. Rideout (Special Education), Miss B. Robinson (Business Education, English)

August 18 and 19, the Historical Society of Kent County presents its fourth annual Legacy Day celebration of “Community, History and Culture.”

This year’s celebration recognizes the role of African American education and teachers in Kent County before the schools were integrated in 1967. As part of the celebration, members of the Historical Society contacted as many of the former teachers as they could, compiling a fascinating narrative of the history of Kent County Education more than 50 years ago. The results of their research were the foundation for the Historical Society’s “History Happy Hour” on August 4, and are summarized in an article by Bill Leary, available at the Historical Society’s Bordley Center at the corner of High and Cross streets in Chestertown.  Come by and pick one up during Legacy Day.

Eloise Johnson – Maryland State Teacher of the Year in 1974

The article goes well back into the early days of African American schools in the county, which were established in 1872, in response to a state law passed earlier that year. There were originally five schools for black children; however, as Leary notes, the black community had established a number of private schools before that date. By 1930, there were 22 schools for black students, many of them one- or two-room schools without plumbing or electricity. In 1916, the original Garnet Elementary School opened on College Avenue in Chestertown, across from Bethel A.M.E. Church. It became Garnet High School in 1923.  In 1950, a new building was constructed across the street,  next to Bethel Church, and was Kent County’s only African American high school until 1967, when all schools were integrated.  Garnet then became an integrated elementary school while both black and white students attended Chestertown High School.

Legendary Garnet principal Elmer T. Hawkins set the tone for education in the black community. Hawkins, a graduate of Morgan State College, served as Garnet’s principal for 41 of the 44 years that the building served as the high school for Kent County’s African-American students.  After integration in 1967, he served as the principal of the integrated Chestertown Middle School until his death in 1973.

Leary’s article drew on interviews from a number of retired teachers and their students and families to give a detailed picture of the place of the schools in the black community during the segregation era. Many of those teachers have agreed to return, several from as far away as Georgia, to take part in this year’s Legacy Day commemoration, which will include a reception honoring their contributions at Sumner Hall at 7 p.m. Friday, August 18.

Lauretta Freeman – 2017 Legacy Day Grand Marshall

The teachers will also ride in the Legacy Day parade at 5 p.m. Saturday, traveling a route from the Dixon Valve parking lot to Fountain Park, where the main celebration, including a concert and street dance, will take place. One of the teachers, Lauretta Freeman, grand marshal of the parade, is quoted widely in Leary’s article.

Master of Ceremonies for Legacy Day is Rev. Ellsworth Tolliver. Live music will be provided by Soulfied Village, with local band members Devone “Tweety” Comegys and Courtney McCloria Parson. Soulfied Village features songs of the Motown Era. T music begins at 6 p.m. and there will be a DJ during band breaks to ensure continuous music. Dancing in the streets is encouraged! Or bring a lawn chair and sit back and enjoy the festivities. High Street will be closed off between Cross and Spring Streets, and there will be vendors offering food and drinks, including a beer truck sponsored by the Historical Society.

There will be two additional Legacy Day activities earlier Saturday. A genealogy workshop at Kent County Public Library at 10 a.m. will give anyone interested in tracing family history the tools for doing their own research. The workshop will be conducted by Jeanette Sherbondy and Amanda Tuttle-Smith of the Historical Society. The workshop, like all Legacy Day activities, is free and open to all.

 

Elementary and high school teachers from 1953/54 school year. Garnet High School Principal Elmer T. Hawkins on right end of the first row

Saturday afternoon, at Janes United Methodist Church, on the corner of Cross and Cannon streets, there will be a concert by the Men’s Choir of Janes Church, honoring the African American teachers in song. The concert is from 1 to 3 p.m.

During the Legacy Day activities, the Bordley Center – on High Street at the intersection with Cross Street – will be open for visitors to view the displays created by the Historical Society. There will also be a silent auction with proceeds benefitting the Historical Society’s Legacy Day fund.

In just four years, Legacy Day has become one of Chestertown’s most popular events, attracting visitors – many of whom are returning home to honor their community’s history and culture – from the entire region. Add on the chance to dance away a summer night to live music, and you’ve got a sure-fire way to enjoy an evening.

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Shedding Light on the Great Total Solar Eclipse of 2017 by Greg Mort

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A total solar eclipse is an exotic event disrupting the normal routine of our celestial drama. This extraordinary event evokes the same kind of wonder as the appearance of a comet or a meteor shower. Throughout history, cosmic occurrences have ignited inspiration as well as consternation. Historically before eclipses were understood or predicted, ancient people were terrified.

Today we have the benefit of centuries of scientific knowledge to our diminish fears and enrich our experience. However, I would like to propose, to more fully enjoy the Great Total Eclipse of 2017 that you witness it as purely as possible by simply using all your five senses.

The morning of August 21st a total solar eclipse will race across the continental United States drawing an unprecedented amount of public attention. Our first truly transcontinental total solar eclipse in nearly 100 years and the first since the inception of the Internet we will have the ability to instantly communicate personal expression/interpretation and information. Even viewers clouded out or not in the direct path of totality will be able to share the event via live-feeds on many social media platforms.

As an artist and an astronomer who has logged as many hours at the telescope as at my easel, my suggestion is to view this once in a lifetime event free from our normal appendages of multi sensorial devices such as cameras and or communication devices.

While I compose these thoughts several weeks before the big day, many folks have made their travel plans, booked hotels, campsites, rented RV’s, imposed on relatives or strangers in the path of totality. A grand chorus of news coverage, endless but important safety warnings and equipment sales of all sizes and costs have already begun. In fact, if you are just now considering your battle plan, you are behind the curve by quite a bit. Still, don’t despair there is hope. Even if your hometown lies beyond the path of totality, a partial eclipse can be memorable if you take the time to enjoy the spectacle on multiple experiential levels.

Throughout a total solar eclipse and depending upon your location and good fortunate with the weather gods our sun will be partly or entirely blocked out by the moon passing directly in front of it. The moon’s close proximity to Earth allows it to appear to cover (eclipse) the solar disk even though it is hundreds of times smaller than

Greg Mort eclipse watching. Note solar discs projected on the ground.

our sun. As the moon’s shadow travels across the earth at over 1000 miles an hour (due to the moons orbital motion minus the Earth’s eastward), the viewer will witness the gentle lunar dance lasting about two hours from start to finish. The sky will slowly darken; temperatures will drop as the air under the shadow cools causing winds to dissipate transforming the landscape with an eerie stillness. One should not expect the sky to appear uniformly dark.

The area closest to the sun will be darkened, and as we gaze toward the earth’s horizon, it will appear lighter. The highlight, (total coverage of the sun) will only last a little over two minutes. During these tantalizing few moments, the jet-black disk of the moon is directly over the sun. A breathtaking sun-lite halo called the corona (Latin for crown) surrounding the disc. Then as the dance progresses light streaks through the valleys of the lunar mountains in a brief sparkling phenomenon known as “Baily’s Beads.”

Be open to all of the unique qualities a solar eclipse has to offer. There is a fascinating list of observations you can witness aside from following the disc of the moon as it crosses over the sun. For example, since the entire event spans about two hours make a note of how the quality, tone, color or transparency of light around you change. From my experience, wondrous and unusual lighting effects are parts of the drama of any total or partial solar eclipse. In general, the tone of what would normally be a sunny bright day gives way to an ever-changing palette of “silvery” light. Some observers have also reported a “green-ness” as the light diminishes.

Those viewers in the direct path of the moon’s shadow will also enjoy the brief appearance of several planets and bright stars. Starting at about thirty minutes before totality the planets Venus, Jupiter, Mars, and Mercury will gradually come into view. The brightest star in our sky, Sirius along with Arcturus, Capella and Regulus will add to the spectacle.

Please remember that no matter how much of the sun’s disc is covered it is always advised to use proper protective eye shielding at all times. Inexpensive Mylar solar filters and glasses are available from many sources.

To photograph or not to photograph is a very common and important question. I was confronted with the same choice during my first artistic commission as a NASA artist. The veteran members of the Shuttle Art team who had portrayed earlier missions wisely suggested not wasting valuable time snapping pictures. Rather they recommended focusing on a real-time emotional eyewitness record.

I failed to heed their warning and purchased a camera that could take continuous frames. Fortunately, as Sally Ride became the first American woman to orbit the Earth, I was able to take a number of images and watch at the carry any of the impact of the brilliant light, thundering sound, earthquake like vibration, smell of the rocket fuel or the sensation of the infrared heat hitting your face even at three miles from the launch pad! In the end the artwork that I produced for the NASA Art

The program came entirely from the overpowering emotional impact of witnessing this powerful event. Photographing was a total waste of time and a major distraction.

For photographs of this eclipse, I plan to depend upon the thousands of professional images taken by people well versed in recording such a rare event that will be instantaneously available to the public via the Internet, journals, and magazines. My first priority will be to savor each aspect of the spectacle, first-hand, record it via the mind’s eye, and use all five senses to totally absorb the atmosphere.

However, if it is just too hard to resist the temptation to capture the event electronically, here are a few simple tricks that should produce positive results. Use a tripod to hold your cell phone or camera for hands-free operation. Set up and test your equipment in advance and practice the steps you will follow to confirm smooth functioning. Making your technical process as “automatic “ as possible should allow you the freedom to enjoy the eclipse on a high tech as well as sensorial level.

Finally, I would also encourage watching the eclipse with others. The more perspectives and memories you rally together, the better your chances are to notice a discrete aspect or unique interpretation of the phenomenon. After the show has come and gone it is particularly wonderful to discuss and relive the event with your fellow eclipse companions.

Then, you can all start planning for the next eclipse adventure

Greg Mort is an internationally recognized contemporary artist who is represented by the Carla Massoni Gallery, a passionate amateur astronomer and member of the NASA Shuttle Art Team who serves on the board of the Lowell Observatory. He is traveling to Madras, Oregon to view the eclipse with family and friends.

Open Auditions for “Carrie the Musical” at Church Hill Theatre and Chesapeake College

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Calling all performers, no experience necessary! Carrie the Musical, a musical based on the unforgettable Stephen King novel with book by Lawrence D. Cohen, music by Michael Gore, and lyrics by Dean Pitchford, will be coming to the Church Hill Theatre and Chesapeake College’s Cadby Theatre stages. This collaborative production will be directed by Dr. Robert Thompson, instructor of theatre at Chesapeake College, and will run October 27th through November 12th, 2017—just in time for Halloween! Performances will play opening weekend at the Cadby Theatre at Chesapeake College, then travel to the CHT stage for the remaining two weekends.

This chilling musical tells the story of outcast Carrie White and the bullying she faces not only with her high school peers, but also from her unstable mother. Catchy and sometimes haunting music and an unsettling story make Carrie the Musical a Halloween treat. When a young woman confronted with social pressures discovers hidden powers fueled by her emotions, her senior prom is bound to be “A Night We’ll Never Forget!”

Open auditions for Carrie the Musical will be held at Church Hill Theatre on Saturday, August 19th at 12:30 p.m. and at Cadby Theatre at Chesapeake College on Wednesday, August 23rd at 6:00 p.m.

Casting needs will include 2 female leads, 4 supporting roles (2F/2M), 2 male feature roles, along with at least 3 male and 3 female parts in the ensemble. Please note that the script does involve mature themes and some language, and parents should consult with the director prior to auditions to discern if their child should audition.

Please come with sixteen bars of a prepared song and sheet music if possible (two copies). Sides from the script will be available for cold readings—no audition monologue required. Technicians for the production are also needed and should attend auditions to submit their interest.

Carrie the Musical will play weekends from Friday October 27th through Sunday November 12th, 2017. For more information, email the director Rob Thompson at rthompson@chesapeake.edu. For more information on auditions, performances, and membership opportunities, please contact the Church Hill Theatre office at 410-556-6003, via e-mail at office@churchhilltheatre.org, or visit the  Church Hill Theatre Facebook Page.

It Happened on Queen Street

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David and Anne Singer of Chestertown were out of town for a few days at the beginning of July.  When they returned, they noticed a puddle in the driveway but thought nothing of it.  Maybe it had rained.  But the next day, the puddle was still there.  Was it a little larger?  Long story short, a pipe under the driveway from the house had sprung a leak.  They turned off the water to the house and called their plumber.  However, it was now in the middle of the July 4th holiday.  Their plumber was out on a job and not available.  They called several other plumbers but each was either busy or didn’t have the large equipment necessary to dig down to the pipes. The Singers had now been over 24 hours with no water in their house.  Finally, they found Doug Nicholson, Sr, plumber and electrician, who had the equipment and was willing to come in over a holiday for an emergency job.  After excavating the full length of the driveway to a depth of about five, Nicholson unearthed something the Singers had never seen before – “tar-paper” pipes.

The Singers’ house is one of those wonderful old brick homes on Queen Street. Built around 1790, number 109 N. Queen Street is listed as “The Chambers House” in Michael Bourne’s Historic Houses of Kent County (p 350). According to Bourne, it was probably built at the same time (1788-90) as the Nicholson House, next door, with which it shares several architectural features including a molded Doric cornice, one of the earliest documented in Kent County.

The plumber-to-the-rescue, Doug Nicholson, Sr., is not related to the next-door Nicholson House family from the 1790s, – as far as we know. But then again, it’s Kent County, so who knows!

The Chambers house is not known to be listed in any official records until 1811 when it appeared on a deed. The land was acquired in 1786 by Benjamin Chambers, a prominent attorney in the town who served as Clerk of the Court and later as a general of the militia at the Battle of Caulk’s Field. His prominence can be measured by the fact that in 1810 he moved to Widehall. At that point, he transferred the house to his son Ezekial Chambers, a prominent attorney in his own right and later a judge. The younger Chambers moved to Widehall in 1822, and the North Queen Street house became a rental property until 1865, when Chambers sold it to a local contractor, John Greenwood.

Then Greenwood sold the property just a year later to the Vestry of Chester Parish, who converted it into a residence for the rectors of Emmanuel Church. It remained in the hands of the parish until 1910. During that time, the house was expanded to add a pantry and dining room on the first floor and two bedrooms upstairs. Thereafter it had several owners until 1994, when the Singers bought it and began restoring it.

The tar-paper pipes were a surprise to the Singers but not to Nicholson who said that he had seen them often in the older parts of town. They looked like hollowed out logs.  Not at all like today’s plastic pipes. The tar-paper pipe is made of wood pulp and pitch. It represents a less expensive alternative to classic clay piping which has been used throughout history, in ancient Rome, through Chinese dynasties, and into modern times, and is usually referred to as terra cotta.

In addition to tar-paper pipes being used as sewer pipes, they were frequently used as conduits for electrical wiring – notably in the Empire State Building and other skyscrapers. Tar-paper pipes were also adopted by the oil industry to pump salt wastewater out of drilling sites. Its use as sewer pipe was very common during World War II and into the 1950s, which fits Nicholson’s estimate that the pipe at 109 N. Queen St. was “about 70 years old.”  The pipes are commonly called Orangeburg pipes from the name of the upstate New York town where they were manufactured by the Fiber Conduit Company, which later changed its name to the Orangeburg Manufacturing Company. Orangeburg pipes were widely used from 1860 until 1970, when plastic pipe such as PCV came into common use.

Bob Sipes, Utilities Manager for the town of Chestertown, said the sewer system on Queen Street was installed in the first decade of the 20th century, so it’s conceivable that the Orangeburg pipe, which is a lateral line leading from the town sewer mains to the house, dates back to that period. However, that would be unusually long for that sort of pipe to last.  The town’s water and sewer systems were not built using Orangeburg.

Orangeburg pipe’s main liability is its tendency to flatten under pressure. The layers of rolled-up tar paper can also begin to separate, creating “bubbles” or humps.  While its normal life expectancy was listed at 50 years and some can last considerably longer, Orangeburg was often known to fail within 10 years, usually due to the pressure of the soil in which it was buried. So this one, at 70 years old, did pretty well.

While we were there taking pictures and talking to the Singers and several neighbors who came by to see the progress, we noticed a steady stream of cars come slowly up the one-way street, carefully negotiating the speed bump and the construction.  David Singer sighed and said that for some reason many GPS systems give this narrow, one-lane, one-way, residential street as the preferred route to downtown Chestertown rather than the wider Cross or Spring streets.  At least, he noted, the drivers first view of Chestertown is the beautiful, historic homes of Queen Street.

Well, now the pipes are all replaced with modern longer-lasting pipes.  The water is turned back on. The Singers can heave a sigh of relief. Until the next time.  That’s the joys of owning an historical home – you never know what’s in the attic, under the stairs or the paint or even the driveway.  But you learn a lot of fascinating history along the way.

(This article, “It Happened on Queen Street,” is the first in an irregular Spy series on the homes and history of Chestertown and Kent County.  Please contact us if you have an idea for a future subject in the series, either below in the comments or by email to Editor@ChestertownSpy.com.)

All done! But then it’s never all done with an old house, is it?

Soroptimists Host “Meet and Greet” Saturday, August 5 

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The Soroptimists International of Kent and Queen Anne’s Counties is having a “Meet and Greet” at Nana’s Niche, Saturday, August 5 from 10 am to 2 pm. It is part of the First Saturday in Galena.  

If you would like to volunteer and make a difference in the lives of women and girls, we hope you will become a part of our organization.  Also, if you have been collecting “Redner’s Save A Tape” receipts, you can drop them off at Nana’s Niche.  For more information, contact Connie at 410-708-5352 .  Also, please visit our Facebook page.

The Soroptimists International is a worldwide volunteer organization that focuses on improving the lives of women and girls through programs leading to social and economic empowerment.  According to the official website “Soroptimist means ‘best for women’ and that’s what we strive to be—an organization of women at their best helping other women to be their best. As a volunteer organization of business and professional women, we feel uniquely qualified to help women and girls live their dreams.  It’s true that both men and women live in poverty, face discrimination and must overcome obstacles. But throughout history—in every country in the world—women and girls face additional obstacles and discrimination solely because of their gender.”  The Soroptimists sponsor programs such as the “Live Your Dream” education and training awards for women. For more information, visit the official Soroptimist website.