Easton’s Primary Stroke Center Earns Gold Plus Status from American Stroke Association

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Stroke, a disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain, takes the lives of more than 130,000 Americans each year and is the leading cause of serious long-term disability in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When in need of prompt care for stroke, residents of the five-county region served by University of Maryland Shore Regional Health have access to a designated Primary Stroke Center at University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton.

A Primary Stroke Center designation is given by the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS) when standards are met to support better outcomes for stroke care. Certification standards include having a dedicated stroke-focused program, staffed by specially trained medical professionals – 24 hours a day, 7 days each week – who provide expedited diagnostic services and stroke care.

UM Shore Medical Center at Easton’s Stroke Center recently received the American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association’s (ASA) Get With The Guidelines®– Stroke Gold Plus Achievement Award with Target: StrokeSM Honor Roll Elite Plus. The award recognizes the hospital’s commitment to providing the most appropriate stroke treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

Photo: The Primary Stroke Center team, led by medical director, Dr. Terry Detrich, and neuroscience specialist and Stroke Center coordinator, Nicole Leonard, is a multidisciplinary team that includes physicians, nurses, Emergency Department staff, diagnostic services such as imaging and lab, and pharmacy. Pictured are (back row) Gary Bigelow, director, Imaging Services; Diane Walbridge, director of Acute Care and Emergency Services; neurologists, Dr. Walid Kamsheh and Dr. Detrich; certified registered nurse practitioner, Rahel Alemu; Mary Collins, nurse leader, 2 East Multi-Specialty Care Unit at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton; Ryan Foster, manager, Emergency Services at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton; (front) Jennifer Miles, nurse manager of Easton’s Multi-Specialty Care and Neuroscience Units; Nicole Leonard; and Ruth Ann Jones, senior vice president, Nursing Services, and chief nursing officer.

According to the ASA, hospitals earning the Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award have reached an aggressive goal of treating patients with 85 percent or higher adherence to all Get With The Guidelines-Stroke achievement indicators for two or more consecutive 12-month periods and have achieved 75 percent or higher compliance with five of eight Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Quality measures.

In conjunction with its Gold Plus status, Easton’s Primary Stroke Center also achieved the Target: Stroke Honor Roll Elite Plus, demonstrating success in meeting quality measures to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), Alteplase, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. If given in the first three hours after the onset of stroke symptoms, Alteplase has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability. Administered intravenously through the arm, Alteplase works by dissolving the obstructive clot and improving blood flow to the part of the brain being deprived of blood flow.

The quality measures established by the AHA/ASA are designed to help hospital teams follow the most up-to-date, evidence-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients.

“Members of the Primary Stroke Center team at Shore Medical Center at Easton are specially trained in diagnosing and treating all types of stroke,” comments Nicole Leonard, RN, BSN, neuroscience specialist and stroke coordinator.  Much like the objective of core quality measures set forth by the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association, our top priority is prompt, effective care and positive patient outcomes. We have been able to achieve these awards because of the collaborative effort of our entire Stroke Center team. ”

According to Leonard, the three types of stroke are ischemic stroke, caused by a clot obstructing the flow of blood to the brain; a hemorrhagic stroke, caused by a blood vessel rupturing and causing bleeding inside the brain; and a transient ischemic attack (TIA), which is a temporary interruption of blood flow to an area of the brain.

“Stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or ruptures,” she remarks. “When that happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood and oxygen it needs causing vital brain cells to die – 1.9 million neurons die each minute stroke treatment is delayed.”

“Our highly skilled medical providers and clinicians strive to make our organization the region’s leader in patient-centered care,” says Ken Kozel, president and CEO, UM Shore Regional Health. “The Stroke Center’s recent recognition from the American Stroke Association demonstrates our team’s commitment to delivering innovative stroke treatments to patients as quickly and safely as possible when care is needed at the most critical time.”

Expanding upon the magnitude the Gold Plus designation, Terry Detrich, MD, local neurologist and medical director of the Stroke Center, remarks, “This is a fantastic achievement for a small hospital to be able to make the great advancements we have in complying with national stroke care guidelines.”

He continues, “It is also an incredible achievement for everyone on the team – the physicians, nurses, x-ray and lab personnel, the pharmacy team and the entire Emergency Department team. We all continue to work harder to update our capabilities, working with our partners at University of Maryland Medical System, to further enhance the care that we provide to our community members.”

Detrich also feels strongly about the key role that local emergency medical services play in the Stroke Center’s ability to treat patients appropriately and timely. “We would not be successful in our efforts to provide high-quality stroke care without the collaboration of our local Emergency Services teams,” he says.

The Stroke Center team at UM Shore Medical Center at Easton lives by the principle that time lost is brain lost, and because of that, clinicians feel it is imperative for patients to seek treatment for stroke at the first sign or symptom. To recognize signs and symptoms of stroke, it is recommended that people remember the word “FAST” – Facial drooping; Arm weakness; Speech difficulty; and if any of these symptoms are present, it’s Time to call 9-1-1 as immediate medical attention is necessary.

Additional information about the Primary Stroke Center at University of Maryland Shore Medical Center at Easton can be found at UMShoreRegional.org/stroke.

As part of the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS), University of Maryland Shore Regional Health is the principal provider of comprehensive health care services for more than 170,000 residents of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. UM Shore Regional Health’s team of employees, medical staff, board members and volunteers works with various community partners to fulfill the organization’s mission of Creating Healthier Communities Together.

Shore Kids Camp for Children with Type 2 Diabetes

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Enrollment is now open for Shore Kids Camp, a four-day camp experience for children (ages 8-13) with diabetes that takes place July 17-21, 2017 at MEBA Engineering School on Route 33 (the Oxford Road) in Easton.

Provided by University of Maryland Shore Regional Health, Shore Kids Camp helps children with diabetes learn more about their disease and how to manage it in a safe and healthy environment while enjoying many activities, including bowling, boat rides, and visits to organic farms and area museums. The camp is managed by pediatric nurses with experience in diabetes who are assisted by high school and college students as volunteers. It also receives support from varied community groups, including local Lions Clubs, Rotary Clubs, and the Talbot County Public Schools field hockey teams.

“There is no other activity like this on the Eastern Shore,” says Wynne Aroom, patient education specialist, UM Shore Regional Health. “The diabetes camps across the Bay Bridge are overnight camps — many parents are reluctant to send their young children that far away while others find the cost of ‘sleep-away’ camp prohibitive.

The educational aspect of the camp experience includes guest speakers from the hospital and community such as dietitians, other diabetes educators, nurses with diabetes, podiatrists, dental hygienists and ophthalmologists. The children also play various learning games. Says Aroom, “These activities help boost the children’s confidence that they can survive without their parents. In many cases, they are the only child in their school class with diabetes, which is very challenging for them. At Shore Kids Camp, there is a lot of sharing and learning from each other, so they feel less alone in the challenges they face daily,” she adds.

Aroom also notes that Shore Kids Camp helps parents by providing needed respite from round-the-clock vigilance and the confidence that their child is having fun in a safe environment, as well as the opportunity to meet and talk with other families coping with Type 2 diabetes.

The camp fee is $75 per child and the registration deadline is July 7, 2017. For further details, contact Wynne Aroom, 410-822-1000, ext. 5286, or waroom@umm.edu.

As part of the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS), University of Maryland Shore Regional Health is the principal provider of comprehensive health care services for more than 170,000 residents of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. UM Shore Regional Health’s team of more than 2,500 employees, medical staff, board members, and volunteers works with various community partners to fulfill the organization’s mission of Creating Healthier Communities Together.

Quality Health Foundation Awards $380K in Grants throughout Maryland and the District of Columbia

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Quality Health Foundation (QHF) has announced this year’s grant awards totaling $380,000 in Maryland and Washington, D.C.that support local healthcare-related quality improvement efforts.

Of the 67 applications, 15 organizations received grants. “The Board received many diverse and deserving applications this year,” said Dr. Molly Burgoyne, QHF Board of Directors Chair. “It’s reassuring to know there are so many organizations with programs designed to improve the health of our most vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we chose a stellar group of programs covering a wide geographic area with diverse health concerns.  Dr. Catherine Smoot-Haselnus, Board chair of Quality Health Strategies, the parent company of QHF, added “The work these organizations do is outstanding and often go unnoticed.  We are proud to provide both funding and encouragement to the many volunteers and staff members who serve the community so well.”

The 2017-18 grantees are:
• Access Carroll
• Aspire Counseling
• Associated Black Charities
• Breast Care for Washington
• Channel Marker
• Community Ministries of Rockville
• Hearing and Speech Agency
• Help and Outreach Point of Entry
• La Clinica del Pueblo
• Lutheran Social Services of the National Capital Area
• Maryland Foundation of Dentistry for the Handicapped
• Miriam’s Kitchen
• Mission of Mercy
• Samaritan House
• University of Maryland Medical System Foundation-Breathmobile

For more information on the recipients and their grants, go to www.qualityhealthfoundation.org/

About Quality Health Foundation

Quality Health Foundation, the mission arm of Quality Health Strategies, is a national not-for-profit organization that provides grants to charitable organizations in Maryland and the District of Columbia. Since 2006, Quality Health Foundation has awarded grants totaling almost $4.5 million to provide support to underserved communities

For more information, visit www.qualityhealthfoundation.org/

Maryland Health Care Commission Public Hearing Notice

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The purpose of the public hearings is to gather input from residents about health and health care in their communities. The Rural Health Care Delivery Work Group will use community input from these hearings to develop an approach to improve health and well-being for the Mid-Shore and other rural communities in Maryland. Members of the Rural Health Work Group, staff of MHCC, and our research team will attend the hearings.

Public Hearing Structure

When speaking, please introduce yourself and limit your comments to no more than 3 minutes.

Agenda

Welcome – Hearing Officer

Summary of the Work Group charge and Study structure – MHCC Staff

Comments by community residents (100 minutes).

Please address the following issues in your comments:

Community health strengths
o What contributes to health and well-being in your community?
– Identify any programs or services that work well to support health and well-being
Health challenges faced by the community
o What are some of the challenges that your community faces in being healthy?
– E.g. access to care, workforce, transportation, insurance coverage, wellness programs, behavioral health, economic challenges, etc.
Identify what is important to you for community health
o If you had to pick one issue that would improve the health and well-being of your community, which issue would you address?
o What change/improvement would have the greatest impact in improving the health of your community?

Conclusion and wrap up (5 minutes) — Hearing Officer

Locations and Times

Public hearings will be held in each of the Mid-Shore counties at the following location, date and time:

Queen Anne’s County Tuesday, June 6th 6:00pm – 8:00pm Queen Anne’s County Complex Planning Commission Room 110 Vincit Street Centreville, MD 21617
Talbot County Monday, June 12th 6:30pm – 8:30pm Talbot County Community Center Wye Oak Room 10028 Ocean Gateway Easton, Maryland
Caroline County Tuesday, June 13th 6:30pm-8:30pm  

Denton Elementary School
300 Sharp Road
Denton, Maryland

There is no registration for these hearings. Residents seeking to speak at the hearings may contact MHCC. Residents can also provide written comments to MHCC staff by email or mail up to two weeks following the public hearings.

MHCC Contact Information
Maryland Health Care Commission
4160 Patterson Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21215
410.764.3284

Erin Dorrien, Chief, Government & Public Affairs, erin.dorrien@maryland.gov
Kathy Ruben, Center for Health Care Facilities Planning and Development, kathleen.ruben@maryland.gov

Resources
Additional information and resources are posted to the Maryland Health Care Commission
website (http://mhcc.maryland.gov/) under the MHCC quick links to “Workgroups”

New Ramp Vans at Delmarva Community Transit

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Delmarva Community Transit has made significant additions to its fleet, with the recent purchase of five vans. Each is equipped with a ramp, allowing easy access for riders using wheelchairs or other assistive devices. DCT operates public transportation in Dorchester, Talbot, Caroline and Kent counties, including fixed-route buses and door-to-door service with vans for qualifying riders. DCT is the transit division of Delmarva Community Services, Inc., a private, non-profit corporation. For information on travel options, call 410-221-7600.

Doris Allen Tate Earns CRNP to Become Advanced Care Practitioner

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Doris Allen Tate, formerly lead diabetes educator for the UM Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology, recently became a certified registered nurse practitioner (CRNP) and has joined forces with Faustino Macuha, Jr., MD and nurse practitioners Anna Antwi and Bobbi Atkinson as an advanced care provider for diabetes and endocrinology patients.

Tate joined the Center in 2013 and in 2014, completed her BSN from Wilmington University. She was awarded her MSN, Adult Gerontology Nurse Practitioner in 2016. As lead diabetes educator, she has taught diabetes self-management classes and worked with patients one-on-one to help them avoid complications and manage their diabetes for optimal wellness. Tate, who resides in Easton,and her fellow diabetes educators — Karen Canter, Karen Hollis, Mary King, Chrissy Nelson and Renee Woodward — also host monthly diabetes support groups in Cambridge, Chestertown, Denton and Easton.

Prior to joining the Center for Diabetes & Endocrinology, Tate served Choptank Community Health System as a diabetes educator for six years. “I am thrilled to be able to provide advanced diabetes care in my new role in the Center,” she says.“In addition, I’m continuing to lead the Denton diabetes support group, which meets the first Wednesday evening of every month at St. Luke’s Church in Denton.”

For information regarding the services of the UM Center for Diabetes & Endocrinology, call 410-822-1000, ext. 5757.

As part of the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS), University of Maryland Shore Regional Health is the principal provider of comprehensive health care services for more than 170,000 residents of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. UM Shore Regional Health’s team of more than 2,500 employees, medical staff, board members, and volunteers works with various community partners to fulfill the organization’s mission of Creating Healthier Communities Together.

Nearly New Shop Father’s Day Raffle

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Beginning May 30, the Nearly New Shop will be selling tickets for their Father’s Day raffle. The raffle prize will include a dark gray, cashmere men’s sweater, with retail tags attached for $300, and a $25 gift certificate to Lemon Leaf Café.

Tickets are priced at $2.00 and may be purchased at the Chester River Hospital Center Auxiliary Gift Shop at UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown and the Nearly New Shop, located at 320 High Street in Chestertown. All proceeds from the raffle will benefit the UM Shore Medical Center in Chestertown.

The drawing for the sweater and gift card will be on June 30.For more information, call Molly Streit, manager, at 410-778-7668, ext. 2351 or Sue Edson, president, Chester River Hospital Center Auxiliary, 410-348-2159.  All sales conducted by the Chester River Hospital Auxiliary are for the benefit of programs, services, equipment and patient care at UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown.

About UM Shore Regional Health: As part of the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS), University of Maryland Shore Regional Health is the principal provider of comprehensive health care services for more than 170,000 residents of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. UM Shore Regional Health’s team of more than 2,600 employees, medical staff, board members and volunteers work with various community partners to fulfill the organization’s mission of Creating Healthier Communities Together.

Compass Regional Hospice Offers Drug Overdose Support Group

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Compass Regional Hospice is forming a new grief support group for adults who have experienced the death of loved one to a drug overdose.  RASP— Reconciling After A Substance Passing— will meet at the Compass Regional Hospice Hope & Healing Center, 255 Comet Drive in Centreville beginning Thursday, June 15 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  This group will meet the third Thursday of each month. 

RASP will be co-facilitated by Rhonda Knotts, MSCC, grief support coordinator and counselor; and Linda Turner, MS, grief counselor for Compass Regional Hospice. 

Grief counselors Rhonda Knotts, MSCC (left) and Linda Turner, MS (right) will co‐facilitate a new, ongoing grief support group for adults who have experienced the death of a loved one to a drug overdose.

This support group is open to anyone 18 and older. There is no cost to participate. Participants are welcome to drop in each month as they need support.

After the opioid crisis was declared a state of emergency in Maryland there has been an increase in enforcement, prevention, and treatment services, but those who are grieving the loss of a loved one to drug overdose may feel like they are forgotten about.

“Our own community has been tremendously affected by this epidemic and countless numbers of individuals now find themselves mourning the loss of a child, sibling, friend or loved one from a tragic overdose,” says Rhonda Knotts, grief support coordinator and counselor.

“Our team recognizes the effect that drug overdoses have had on our community and want to make sure that our community has the support and resources available to them,” says Knotts. “This support group is a safe place for individuals to come to reconcile with their loss, and find compassion and understanding from people experiencing similar grief challenges.”

For more information about the RASP support group, contact either of the facilitators Rhonda Knotts, rknotts@compassregionalhospice.org or Linda Turner, lturner@compassregionalhospice.org443-262-4100. Learn more about other grief support programs available through the Compass Regional Hospice Hope & Healing Center by visiting www.compassregionalhospice.org/hopeandhealing.

About the Compass Regional Hospice Hope & Healing Center

The creation of the Hope & Healing Center was the start of a strategic initiative to brand the grief support programs offered through Compass Regional Hospice. The Hope & Healing Center is recognized as a premier resource for restoring hope and healing to adults, teens and children who are coping with grief, loss and trauma in our community.  These grief support programs focus on the needs of family members whose loved ones have died under our hospice care, as well as members of the community who have experienced loss. Grief support services are not covered by Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance, so we depend on donations from our community in order to cover the cost of these vital services.

Much like a compass, the priorities of the Charting Our Course Together capital campaign points the way toward the future of Compass Regional Hospice. In order to meet the unmet and growing needs of our community, the existing Hope & Healing Center located at 255 Comet Drive in Centreville needs to be renovated so that we can continue to expand our grief support services. The planned renovations will create the additional space needed to accommodate new support services and healing modalities.

Every gift ensures that we continue to help your family, friends and neighbors find hope and healing as they chart their own course through grief. For more information about the Charting Our Course Together capital campaign or how you can donate, contact Kenda Leager, development officer, kleager@compassregionalhospice.org443-262-4106 or visit www.compassregionalhospice.org/otherwaystogive/campaign.html.

Nearly New Shop Father’s Day Raffle

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The Nearly New Shop is selling tickets for their Father’s Day raffle. The raffle prize will include a dark gray cashmere men’s sweater, with retail tags attached for $300, and a $25 gift certificate to Lemon Leaf Café.

Tickets are priced at $2.00 and may be purchased at the Chester River Hospital Center Auxiliary Gift Shop at UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown and the Nearly New Shop, located at 320 High Street in Chestertown. All proceeds from the raffle will benefit the UM Shore Medical Center in Chestertown.

The drawing for the sweater and gift card will be on June 30. For more information, call Molly Streit, manager, at 410-778-7668, ext. 2351 or Sue Edson, president, Chester River Hospital Center Auxiliary, 410-348-2159.  All sales conducted by the Chester River Hospital Auxiliary are for the benefit of programs, services, equipment and patient care at UM Shore Medical Center at Chestertown.