Adkins Arboretum Announces Spring Open House, Native Plant Sale

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Adkins Arboretum, offering the Chesapeake gardener the largest selection of native plants for more than 20 years, announces its Spring Open House & Native Plant Sale weekendApril 27–29. The sale benefits the Arboretum’s education programs and affords the public an opportunity to learn about the Delmarva’s native plants and their connection to a healthy Chesapeake Bay.

Plants for sale include a large variety of native perennials, ferns, vines, grasses and flowering trees and shrubs for spring planting. Native flowers and trees provide food and habitat for wildlife and make colorful additions to home landscapes, whether in a perennial border, a woodland garden or a restoration project. Native honeysuckle entices hummingbirds, while tall spikes of purplish flowers grace blue wild indigo. Milkweed provides critical energy for Monarch butterflies on their winter migration to Mexico, and native azaleas present a veritable rainbow of colorful blooms.

Columbine adds color to the spring garden and attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Photo by Kellen McCluskey.

The Open House weekend kicks off on Fri., April 27 with shopping hours beginning at 10 a.m. Chris Pax, lead designer for the Arboretum’s Native Landscape Design Center, will offer Featured Native Plants, a free program to help identify ideal plants for specific spots in your landscape, at 3 p.m. The public is invited from 4 to 6 p.m. for light fare, music, a cash wine and beer bar, a silent auction and shopping in a fun and festive atmosphere.

Plant sales continue Sat., April 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sun., April 29 from noon to 4 p.m. Presale orders may be placed at adkinsarboretum.org through April 8. Simply place your order, and your plants will be ready for pick-up during the Open House weekend. Following the Open House, plants will be for sale at the Visitor’s Center throughout the growing season.

The Arboretum is a participating nursery in the Marylanders Plant Trees native tree discount program. For any native tree valued at $50 or more, shoppers will receive a $25 discount. Some of the special larger trees available for this discount include maple, birch, dogwood and holly.

The Arboretum gift shop will be open during the Open House weekend and will offer books and nature-inspired gifts for gardeners. Members, including those who join during the Open House, receive a 10% discount on plant, gift shop and book purchases. Members at the Contributor ($100) level and above receive a 20% discount on plants.

For more information, call 410-634-2847, extension 0 or visit adkinsarboretum.org.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

A Talk about “Garden Smart, Garden Easy” on March 23

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On Friday, March 23, Tracy Wootten will give a talk about “Garden Smart, Garden Easy – Making Gardening Accessible and Enjoyable for All.” During the many years that Tracy has been working with Master Gardeners, she has collected tips and tricks that can make gardening enjoyable for everyone – even those of us with time or physical limitations.  Not only will Tracy share these fantastic ideas during her talk, she will also bring many tools for demonstration. Attendees will have a change to try out the tools after the talk.

Tracy is the Horticulture Agent for University of Delaware Cooperative Extension in the Sussex County. Tracy has been with the University of Delaware Extension for 28 years. She received her B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Delaware. Tracy is responsible for homeowner and commercial horticulture education and helps coordinate the Sussex County Master Gardener program. In addition, Tracy serves as an advisor for the Delaware Nursery and Landscape Association, and provides business risk management programming for Women in Agriculture.

The program is organized by the University of Maryland Extension and will be held at 10:00am at the Kent County Public Library, 408 High Street, Chestertown, MD 21620. This event is free of charge. For more information, please contact Sabine Harvey, 410-778-1661 or sharvey1@umd.edu. For more information about the “Garden Smart, Garden Easy” program, please visit http://extension.udel.edu/lawngarden/garden-smart/

The University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs are open to all and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status, genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

Gathered and Styled presented by Garden Club of the Eastern Shore

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The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore is thrilled to announce that well-known floral designer Holly Heider Chapple will give a lecture and demonstration on flower arranging on April 3rd at the Oxford Community Center in Oxford.

From China to Russia and Mexico to London, Holly has a worldwide following and is recognized by Martha Stewart as a top-rated floral designer. She has a successful floral design business and flower farm, Hope Farm, based in Waterford Virginia. Holly’s “gathered and styled” arranging is known for an abundance of flower material, mostly seasonal, put together in a very loose, organic style.

“We are so lucky to have Holly come speak to us,” said Samantha McCall, co-chair of the fundraising event and past president of the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore. “She rarely does engagements this size. Holly has hit the big time and we have an awesome opportunity to soak up her passion and creativity in such a small setting. I guarantee she will not disappoint and everyone will leave inspired.”

Most recently, Holly has made headline news in the flower industry with the introduction of game-changing mechanics that she has coined a “pillow” and an “egg.” Instead of using floral foam or chicken wire, these re-usable plastic products help hold long stems in place and offer the designer greater range of direction and size.

You can spend the day or just the afternoon with Holly.

A day with Holly begins at 10 AM with a hands-on workshop in making a signature “Hollyish” bouquet using her recently developed new mechanics. It includes all materials, a boxed lunch, lecture and demonstration followed by afternoon tea. This workshop is limited to 50 participants only. The price is $150.To attend the demonstration and afternoon tea only, the cost is $50 and begins at 1:00 PM. Seating is limited.

Proceeds from the silent auction and event will benefit the college scholarship program of the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore. Each year, the Talbot County-based club awards a college scholarship to a deserving high school senior whose scholastic accomplishments, community work and chosen field of study are consistent with the club’s objectives.

Founded in 1963, the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore is committed to stimulating knowledge of horticulture, aiding in the protection of trees, shrubs, wildflowers and birds and encouraging all conservations practices.

To make reservations, send your check with contact information payable to Garden Club of the Eastern Shore, PO Box 1924, Easton MD 21601. For more information: call 202-487-8599.

Adkins Arboretum Awarded Funds by the Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust

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Adkins Arboretum was recently awarded funding for its Native Plant Propagation Initiative by the Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust (SSHT). Grant funds for improvements and maintenance to the Arboretum’s nursery growing facilities have been awarded in the amount of $11,500 for the calendar year 2018. This award follows a $10,000 grant from the SSHT that funded horticultural project activities during calendar year 2017.

Begun in 2015, the Native Plant Propagation Initiative at Adkins Arboretum is an effort to broaden the selection of native plant species available to the horticultural trade by focusing on under-represented species with ornamental worthiness and important ecological benefits. This is accomplished by scouting for local populations, also known as local ecotypes, of desired native plants and following prescribed protocols to collect seeds and cuttings to propagate stock plants. GPS is used to map those located on Adkins’ grounds, which in turn helps expand the Living Collections Database. Stock plants will be planted in demonstration gardens or seed plots at Adkins, serving as a focal point for educational programs and used to produce plants. The Arboretum is sponsoring a hands-on workshop series during 2018 in which participants will learn about propagation by divisions, seeds and cuttings, as well as sustainable seed harvest and processing, while helping to produce additional plant material for the project.

Adkins Arboretum Horticultural Advisor Leslie Hunter Cario (at right).

The plants under evaluation in the project have the potential to provide numerous ecosystem benefits. As species that are native to the region, they will not pose the threat of invasiveness that is often inherent with exotic species. Through increased production in the nursery trade, and eventually distribution throughout developed landscapes, these plants can provide increased pollen and nectar sources for pollinators, as well as food or shelter for additional species that play a vital role in the food web. By promoting plants that are more tolerant of regional climate, insect and disease pressures, there will consequently be fewer pesticides needed in production or landscape maintenance than some more widely used ornamental species. In response to pressures of climate change, the identification of new regionally appropriate ornamentals will fit closely with the Arboretum’s effort to help shape more resilient communities on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and throughout the Chesapeake Bay region.

Work with the Native Plant Propagation Initiative is undertaken by a core group of Adkins volunteers, along with Adkins Land Steward Kathy Thornton and Horticultural Advisor Leslie Hunter Cario. Volunteers are actively involved with plant scouting, seed collection and propagation activities, as well as researching propagation methods. Production of native plants from local ecotypes at Adkins Arboretum was presented by Cario at the American Public Garden Association’s Native Plants and Plant Conservation Symposium held in Boston in October 2017.

Originally founded as Maryland’s state arboretum in 1980, Adkins Arboretum has operated as a non-profit since 1992 and serves as a model for land management that strives to engage all people in conservation, appreciation and enjoyment of the Chesapeake region’s native landscapes through education, recreation, art and community events. Situated adjacent to Tuckahoe State Park, the Arboretum operates and maintains a visitor’s center, 400 acres of meadows, woods and wetlands, and five miles of paths under a 50-year lease with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Its diverse collection includes more than 600 trees, plants, grasses and wildflower species native to the Eastern Shore and the Mid-Atlantic coastal plain. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847.

The Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust is a private foundation that supports ornamental horticulture education and research projects. Funding has been primarily directed toward projects in North America, South America, Central America, the Caribbean and Australia, with $635,000 awarded to 44 organizations in 2017. To learn more, visit adminitrustllc.com/stanley-smith-horticultural-trust/.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

“Designing Habitats for Pollinators” Talk on March 16

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On Friday, March 16, Kerry Wixted will give a talk about “Destination Pollination: Designing Habitats for Pollinators”.

Pollinators around the world and in Maryland are on the decline. Not only does that pose a threat to the survival of certain insect species, but it would affect our food supply as well. A large number of plants depend on pollination to produce fruits. Without pollination we would not have apples, pears, peaches, plums, almonds, cherries, blueberries, strawberries, grapes, water melon, squash, zucchini, just to name a few.

When we think of pollination, we usually think about honey bees. However, native bees and other pollinators play a large role as well. There are more than 4000 native bee species in the USA. Maryland is home to more than 400 bee species and there are over 200 different species on the Eastern Shore alone. Bees are not the only pollinators around; beetles, wasps, butterflies, moths, flies and even hummingbirds and bats are pollinators as well. This Friday, learn how to create pollinator-friendly habitats in almost any backyard. This talk will focus on plants and habitat practices that help attract pollinators.

Kerry Wixted is an education and outreach specialist for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife and Heritage Service. Kerry runs several state-wide programs such as Project WILD for educators and Wild Acres for backyard wildlife habitat enthusiasts. Kerry holds a B.S. degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Management from Frostburg State University, and a M.S. degree in Biology from West Virginia University. 

The program will be held at 10:00am at the Kent County Public Library, 408 High Street, Chestertown, MD 21620. This event is free of charge. For more information, please contact Sabine Harvey, 410-778-1661 or sharvey1@umd.edu

The University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs are open to all and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status, genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

Support Adkins Arboretum’s Goat Herd at the Arbor Day Run

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Dust off your running shoes and start training to hustle for the herd! Runners, walkers, families and nature enthusiasts are invited to Adkins Arboretum’s 13th annual Arbor Day Run on Sat., April 7. Proceeds benefit the Arboretum’s goat herd, used for targeted grazing of invasive species.

Featuring 5K and 10K races, a free One-Mile Fun Run/Walk and a free Healthy Kids’ 100-yard Dash, the Arbor Day Run is a wonderful opportunity to enjoy an early-spring morning in nature. Participants will pass the Arboretum’s goat herd on the cross-country course plotted along a network of scenic, easily navigable trails.

Runners dash off the starting line at Adkins Arboretum’s 2017 Arbor Day Run. Photo by Kellen McCluskey.

Check-in and day-of registration begin at 8 a.m. The Healthy Kids’ Dash begins at 8:50 a.m., followed by the 10K Run at 9 a.m., the 5K Run at 9:05 a.m. and the One-Mile Fun Run/Walk at 9:10 a.m.

Awards will be presented to the overall male/female master winners and to the top two male/female winners in categories 15 and under through 70 and older in 10-year age groups. Bluepoint Race Management will provide chip timing for the 5K and 10K races. Post-race festivities include refreshments, an awards ceremony with one-of-a-kind tree ring medals and a native tree raffle

Registration is underway, with a discount and an Arbor Day Run T-shirt for those who register for the 5K and 10K by March 25. Fun Run and Healthy Kids’ Dash participants may order T-shirts for $10 each. For fee information or to register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410.634.2847, ext. 0. The Arbor Day Run is generously sponsored by Bay Imprint of Easton.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information about programs, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Dr. Mike Raupp to Speak at Horticulture Lecture March 9

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On Friday, March 9, Dr. Mike Raupp will give a talk about “The influence of Native and Exotic Plants on Insect Communities.” Dr. Raupp will focus on how we can create sustainable managed environments. In addition to talking about the influence of native and non-native plants on insect communities, Dr. Raupp will talk about invasive species such as emerald ash borer and the latest threat, the spotted lantern fly. Spotted Lantern Fly is a pretty, but very destructive insect which has become rampant in Southern Pennsylvania. Experts fear it will invade Maryland during the upcoming growing season

Mike Raupp is a professor of Entomology and an Extension Specialist. He has earned the nickname “The Bug Guy” from students and fans of his blog, BugoftheWeek.com, where he reports on all things bug and insect related. He frequently appears as an expert on Good Morning America, NPR and other news outlets. He has also appeared on BBC, CNN, National Geographic’s Explorer, The Dr. Oz Show, Tyra Banks and The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.

Dr. Raupp is an expert in Integrated Pest Management (IPM). IPM focuses on an environmentally sensitive approach to prevent insect pests and plant diseases. IPM programs try to manage pest damage with the least possible hazard to people, property and the environment. Therefore, IPM is a great practice for the home gardener. The idea is to monitor the landscape for any potential pests and determine when these pest may start to create a problem, i.e. a few stinkbugs won’t do a lot of damage, a few hundred will. The first course of action is to try to prevent the establishment of the pest by altering their habitat or disturbing their life cycle. The use of chemical is seen as a very last resort. And even then, IPM programs recommend using the least toxic chemicals.

The program will be held at 10:00am at the Kent County Public Library, 408 High Street, Chestertown, MD 21620. This event is free of charge. For more information, please contact Sabine Harvey, 410-778-1661 or sharvey1@umd.edu

The University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs are open to all and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status, genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

Garden Notes: 9th Horticulture Lecture Series Starts March 2

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The Kent County Extension Office and the Kent County Public Library are pleased to announce the start of the 19th annual Horticulture Lecture Series. The series is meant for anyone who likes to garden, both amateurs and professionals alike. The talks will focus on a wide array of gardening related topics. The purpose of the talks is to show the audience how to create beauty in your landscape while keeping the health of the environment and the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

The schedule is as follows:

March 2: “Natural Lands Project: Balancing Natural Lands on Working Farms (or how grassland restoration leads to the return of the Northern Bobwhite)”, Dan Small, Field Ecologist, Washington College

March 9: “Influence of Native and Exotic Plants on Insect Communities”, Paula Shrewsbury, Professor of Entomology, Univ. of Maryland

March 16: “Destination Pollination: Designing Habitats for Pollinators”, Kerry Wixted, Outreach Specialist, Department of Natural Resources

March 23: “Garden Smart, Garden Easy – Making Gardening Accessible and Enjoyable for All”, Tracy Wootten, Horticulture Extension Agent, University of Delaware. Ms. Wootten will bring tips and tools which will show how to garden without ruining our bodies.

The programs will be held at the Kent County Public Library, 408 High Street, Chestertown, MD 21620.  All sessions run from 10 a.m. to about 11:30 a.m. This event is free of charge. For more information, please contact Sabine Harvey, 410-778-1661 or sharvey1@umd.edu

 

Adkins Arboretum Offers Landscape Design Workshop March 3

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Register for Adkins Arboretum’s Landscape Design Workshop on Sat., March 3, and learn how to transform your property into an attractive landscape with year-round interest and beauty.

Offered again by popular demand, this all-day workshop will address typical challenges of homeowners in the Chesapeake Bay region. Five experienced landscape designers and avid gardeners will lead this intensive planning session. Come with your challenges and dreams, and leave with a landscape plan, ideas and confidence to transform your home landscape for your enjoyment and pride. Workshop leaders are Jennifer Connoley, Michael Jensen, Cindy Shuart, Meredith Watters and Stephanie Wooten.

The workshop begins at 8:30 a.m. and ends at 3:30 p.m. The fee is $105 for Arboretum members, $130 for non-members and $165 for member couples. Advance registration is required. For more information or to register, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum is the region’s resource for native plants and education programs about nature, ecology and wildlife conservation gardening. For more information about programs, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.