Spy House of the Week: “On the Waterfront”

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On my trips to Chestertown I have noticed the newer townhome buildings on the waterfront so I thought it was time to feature an alternate choice to a detached home. This two-story unit with the amenities of a private beach, walking paths, outdoor pool with bath house that Chester River Landing offers might be the answer to a single detached house.

I liked how the one-car garage was set back from the front elevation so from one direction on the street you focused on the appealing gable front with its symmetrical arrangement of the front door and windows. There was an oval accent window in the stairwell and a front porch that spanned the full width of the house that completes the curb appeal.

The vista from the front door ended in views of windows at the sunroom wing at the rear which was my favorite room. Tall windows on two sides and a fireplace opposite one window wall would invite one to linger by the fire and watch the activity on the river. The open plan of the sunroom, dining area and kitchen with a deck for dining was the hub of the house. I liked how the third side of the kitchen had no upper cabinets and the sink was located here to visually connect the kitchen to the dining and sunroom areas.

The spacious master suite was located on the ground floor. The second floor bedrooms had the bonus room of the rear deck for an expansive “bird’s eye” view of the river.

For more information about this property, contact Liddy Campbell with Cross Street Realtors at 410-708-3779 (o), 410-708-5433 (c), or liddy@csrealtors.com

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Cabin Fever

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If spring ever comes this year to stay I would love to spend a day at this 27 acre nature paradise. I could take nature walks through the woods on winding paths with bridges that crossed over non-tidal ponds. I could stroll along the over 1000 LF of waterfront at the mouth of Cabin John Creek or launch a boat from the pier. Other more strenuous exercise options would be swimming, boating, playing tennis-the perfect summer camp for a day for kids of all ages. When all else fails there is always sunbathing on the sandy beach.

I liked how the low elongated form of the cabin-like house nestled under the canopy of trees and how the house’s stone-faced foundation and stained wood siding blended seamlessly into the landscape. The arched walkway to the front door spanned a natural ravine and the elevated boardwalk was as invasive as possible to the natural marshlands on either side. The boardwalk leads to a deck at the water’s edge and the dock.

The stone and wood materials were carried through to the interior with the stone-faced fireplace surround, stained wood doors, ceilings and wall accents. Of course my favorite rooms were the deck at the rear of the house for dining al fresco and the large screened porch for reading a favorite book while listening to the song birds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about this property, contact Ashton Kelley with Gunther McClary Real Estate at 410-275-2118 (o), 410-708-8144(c) or akelleyre@gmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Eagles Nest

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Throughout my adult life, I have always lived in houses on small lots so properties with large lots where building setbacks or Critical Area restrictions are not issues for development catch my eye. This 20 acre property that contained a new custom built home designed in the farmhouse style, guest house, detached three-car garage and a spacious pergola for “al fresco” picnics had great appeal. The main house has three stories with the third floor tucked under a steeply pitched roof.

I liked the form of the house’s base rectangle with wings projecting out from the sides. The rooms under the projecting wings were one and a half stories high so transoms were added above the windows and doors to create high pitched ceilings inside. A wrap-around porch linked both wings at the front and side of the house.

The kitchen, breakfast nook and the family room were connected to create an open plan. I liked the compact “L” shaped kitchen with the cooktop on a large polygonal island with bar stools. Windows wrapped around the corner of the ”L” for views from the kitchen sink to the landscape beyond. Behind the island was additional storage and a work space. The spacious breakfast nook with built-in seating on three sides surrounded a large table that would also be a great place for board games, especially my favorites, Clue and Scrabble.

The master suite at the rear of the house was another projecting wing so the bedroom had plenty of light from the windows and transoms and French doors led to its own deck. Guest bedrooms were located on all three floors and the second floor also had a TV room with a deck for expansive views of the property. The third floor bedroom tucked under the roof had the “bird’s eye” view of the property. Another option for guests was the charming detached guest cottage with its own front porch-perfect for Miss Scarlet…

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about this property, contact Peter Heller with Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate Company at 410-778-0330 (o), 410-708-3301 (c) or pheller@cbchesapeake.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Adkins Arboretum Announces Spring Open House, Native Plant Sale

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Adkins Arboretum, offering the Chesapeake gardener the largest selection of native plants for more than 20 years, announces its Spring Open House & Native Plant Sale weekendApril 27–29. The sale benefits the Arboretum’s education programs and affords the public an opportunity to learn about the Delmarva’s native plants and their connection to a healthy Chesapeake Bay.

Plants for sale include a large variety of native perennials, ferns, vines, grasses and flowering trees and shrubs for spring planting. Native flowers and trees provide food and habitat for wildlife and make colorful additions to home landscapes, whether in a perennial border, a woodland garden or a restoration project. Native honeysuckle entices hummingbirds, while tall spikes of purplish flowers grace blue wild indigo. Milkweed provides critical energy for Monarch butterflies on their winter migration to Mexico, and native azaleas present a veritable rainbow of colorful blooms.

Columbine adds color to the spring garden and attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Photo by Kellen McCluskey.

The Open House weekend kicks off on Fri., April 27 with shopping hours beginning at 10 a.m. Chris Pax, lead designer for the Arboretum’s Native Landscape Design Center, will offer Featured Native Plants, a free program to help identify ideal plants for specific spots in your landscape, at 3 p.m. The public is invited from 4 to 6 p.m. for light fare, music, a cash wine and beer bar, a silent auction and shopping in a fun and festive atmosphere.

Plant sales continue Sat., April 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sun., April 29 from noon to 4 p.m. Presale orders may be placed at adkinsarboretum.org through April 8. Simply place your order, and your plants will be ready for pick-up during the Open House weekend. Following the Open House, plants will be for sale at the Visitor’s Center throughout the growing season.

The Arboretum is a participating nursery in the Marylanders Plant Trees native tree discount program. For any native tree valued at $50 or more, shoppers will receive a $25 discount. Some of the special larger trees available for this discount include maple, birch, dogwood and holly.

The Arboretum gift shop will be open during the Open House weekend and will offer books and nature-inspired gifts for gardeners. Members, including those who join during the Open House, receive a 10% discount on plant, gift shop and book purchases. Members at the Contributor ($100) level and above receive a 20% discount on plants.

For more information, call 410-634-2847, extension 0 or visit adkinsarboretum.org.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

Spy House of the Week: Timberpeg on Bohemia

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One of my favorite childhood toys was a set of Lincoln logs (ironically invented by Frank Lloyd Wright’s son Lloyd). At the end of our street along a wooded ridge, there was a large log home that fascinated me. The logs had been painted black and the contrast with the white chinking was striking.

Fast forward to 1974 when Jesse Ware’s vision of homes built in the traditional manner of log home mortise and tenon joinery led to his founding of the company “Timberpeg”. As you approach this “Timberpeg” post and beam house, its exterior palette of brown and gray blends into its 8 acre serene wooded setting on the Bohemia River. I loved the rear elevation with its two wings, one with transoms above the three sets of sliding doors to a deck that spanned the length of the house for communing with nature and enjoying the river views beyond the trees. The smaller wing contained the master suite.

As you would expect, the woodwork is the star of the interiors, with a warm honey gold color in the beams, ceiling decking, door and window trim, baseboards, floors and built-ins. There is just enough drywall to balance the wood and to reflect the sunlight streaming in from the skylights. In contrast to the beautiful woodwork, the kitchen cabinets are off-white and the solid surface countertops are a light pattern with an accent stripe at the edge. I could easily imagine working at the kitchen sink and gazing out to the wooded landscape through the sliding doors to the deck.

I also loved the dining room with its high ceiling open to the second floor hall. The handrail was drywall banded with a wood beam below and a wood cap above. The gable ends of the house each had a dramatic window unit consisting of a double window whose sills rested on the baseboard with a half-moon window above. One room was an office but the views of the woods and the river would be too distracting for me until nightfall.

The other gable room was a guest bedroom with the bed flanked by two skylights in the sloped ceiling part of the room and the half-moon window unit on the end wall that created a cozy retreat for a lucky guest. The master suite wing on the ground floor had triple sliding doors to open the room to the river view from the bed. An unique and exquisite house for a nature lover who values peace and privacy-even Holmes couldn’t find any Scandal on this Bohemia…

For more information about this property contact Chris McClary with Gunther McClary Real Estate at 410-275-2118 (o), 410-708-2614 (c) or mcclary21@hotmail.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee.

Spy House of the Week: Victorian Vixen on Mill Street

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This house intrigued me for its blend of Victorian and Queen Anne historic styles. Both styles have front gabled roofs but the cross-gabled roof and the front gable with its bow shaped fascia and decorative spindlework are hallmarks of the Queen Anne style. The 2/2 windows and the full front porch are Victorian so this house is a unique hybrid. This vixen has plenty of make-up with her yellow siding, dark shutters, red trim and light gray metal roof.

I loved the front façade’s symmetry with the alignment of the windows and doors below the distinctive front gable and the simple arched trim work between the porch supports without the fretwork found in both styles. The side elevation facing the fenced garden also had architectural interest with its bay window, another porch, a pair of double windows on both the main and second floors and another entry door.

The double front door with its arched glass tops and transoms opens onto an entrance hall with a stair balustrade on the hall side. I was relieved to see that the period fireplace surround was intact, the period globe pendant lights and the beautiful hardwood floors and stained trim remained. The kitchen has been updated including a skylight for daylight and moonlight. The third floor space with its front window reminded me of my Pittsburgh house since I used my third floor as a TV room and home office area.

 

 

For more information about this property, contact Tracy Stone with Coldwell Banker Chesapeake at 410-778-0330 (o), 410-778-6500 (c) or tstone@cbchesapeake.com, “Equal Housing Opportunity”.

Spy House of the Week is an ongoing series that selects a different home each week. The Spy’s Habitat editor Jennifer Martella makes these selections based exclusively on her experience as a architect.

Jennifer Martella has pursued her dual careers in architecture and real estate since she moved to the Eastern Shore in 2004. Her award winning work has ranged from revitalization projects to a collaboration with the Maya Lin Studio for the Children’s Defense Fund’s corporate retreat in her home state of Tennessee. 

 

A Talk about “Garden Smart, Garden Easy” on March 23

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On Friday, March 23, Tracy Wootten will give a talk about “Garden Smart, Garden Easy – Making Gardening Accessible and Enjoyable for All.” During the many years that Tracy has been working with Master Gardeners, she has collected tips and tricks that can make gardening enjoyable for everyone – even those of us with time or physical limitations.  Not only will Tracy share these fantastic ideas during her talk, she will also bring many tools for demonstration. Attendees will have a change to try out the tools after the talk.

Tracy is the Horticulture Agent for University of Delaware Cooperative Extension in the Sussex County. Tracy has been with the University of Delaware Extension for 28 years. She received her B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Delaware. Tracy is responsible for homeowner and commercial horticulture education and helps coordinate the Sussex County Master Gardener program. In addition, Tracy serves as an advisor for the Delaware Nursery and Landscape Association, and provides business risk management programming for Women in Agriculture.

The program is organized by the University of Maryland Extension and will be held at 10:00am at the Kent County Public Library, 408 High Street, Chestertown, MD 21620. This event is free of charge. For more information, please contact Sabine Harvey, 410-778-1661 or sharvey1@umd.edu. For more information about the “Garden Smart, Garden Easy” program, please visit http://extension.udel.edu/lawngarden/garden-smart/

The University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources programs are open to all and will not discriminate against anyone because of race, age, sex, color, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, ancestry, or national origin, marital status, genetic information, or political affiliation, or gender identity and expression.

Gathered and Styled presented by Garden Club of the Eastern Shore

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The Garden Club of the Eastern Shore is thrilled to announce that well-known floral designer Holly Heider Chapple will give a lecture and demonstration on flower arranging on April 3rd at the Oxford Community Center in Oxford.

From China to Russia and Mexico to London, Holly has a worldwide following and is recognized by Martha Stewart as a top-rated floral designer. She has a successful floral design business and flower farm, Hope Farm, based in Waterford Virginia. Holly’s “gathered and styled” arranging is known for an abundance of flower material, mostly seasonal, put together in a very loose, organic style.

“We are so lucky to have Holly come speak to us,” said Samantha McCall, co-chair of the fundraising event and past president of the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore. “She rarely does engagements this size. Holly has hit the big time and we have an awesome opportunity to soak up her passion and creativity in such a small setting. I guarantee she will not disappoint and everyone will leave inspired.”

Most recently, Holly has made headline news in the flower industry with the introduction of game-changing mechanics that she has coined a “pillow” and an “egg.” Instead of using floral foam or chicken wire, these re-usable plastic products help hold long stems in place and offer the designer greater range of direction and size.

You can spend the day or just the afternoon with Holly.

A day with Holly begins at 10 AM with a hands-on workshop in making a signature “Hollyish” bouquet using her recently developed new mechanics. It includes all materials, a boxed lunch, lecture and demonstration followed by afternoon tea. This workshop is limited to 50 participants only. The price is $150.To attend the demonstration and afternoon tea only, the cost is $50 and begins at 1:00 PM. Seating is limited.

Proceeds from the silent auction and event will benefit the college scholarship program of the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore. Each year, the Talbot County-based club awards a college scholarship to a deserving high school senior whose scholastic accomplishments, community work and chosen field of study are consistent with the club’s objectives.

Founded in 1963, the Garden Club of the Eastern Shore is committed to stimulating knowledge of horticulture, aiding in the protection of trees, shrubs, wildflowers and birds and encouraging all conservations practices.

To make reservations, send your check with contact information payable to Garden Club of the Eastern Shore, PO Box 1924, Easton MD 21601. For more information: call 202-487-8599.

Adkins Arboretum Awarded Funds by the Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust

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Adkins Arboretum was recently awarded funding for its Native Plant Propagation Initiative by the Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust (SSHT). Grant funds for improvements and maintenance to the Arboretum’s nursery growing facilities have been awarded in the amount of $11,500 for the calendar year 2018. This award follows a $10,000 grant from the SSHT that funded horticultural project activities during calendar year 2017.

Begun in 2015, the Native Plant Propagation Initiative at Adkins Arboretum is an effort to broaden the selection of native plant species available to the horticultural trade by focusing on under-represented species with ornamental worthiness and important ecological benefits. This is accomplished by scouting for local populations, also known as local ecotypes, of desired native plants and following prescribed protocols to collect seeds and cuttings to propagate stock plants. GPS is used to map those located on Adkins’ grounds, which in turn helps expand the Living Collections Database. Stock plants will be planted in demonstration gardens or seed plots at Adkins, serving as a focal point for educational programs and used to produce plants. The Arboretum is sponsoring a hands-on workshop series during 2018 in which participants will learn about propagation by divisions, seeds and cuttings, as well as sustainable seed harvest and processing, while helping to produce additional plant material for the project.

Adkins Arboretum Horticultural Advisor Leslie Hunter Cario (at right).

The plants under evaluation in the project have the potential to provide numerous ecosystem benefits. As species that are native to the region, they will not pose the threat of invasiveness that is often inherent with exotic species. Through increased production in the nursery trade, and eventually distribution throughout developed landscapes, these plants can provide increased pollen and nectar sources for pollinators, as well as food or shelter for additional species that play a vital role in the food web. By promoting plants that are more tolerant of regional climate, insect and disease pressures, there will consequently be fewer pesticides needed in production or landscape maintenance than some more widely used ornamental species. In response to pressures of climate change, the identification of new regionally appropriate ornamentals will fit closely with the Arboretum’s effort to help shape more resilient communities on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and throughout the Chesapeake Bay region.

Work with the Native Plant Propagation Initiative is undertaken by a core group of Adkins volunteers, along with Adkins Land Steward Kathy Thornton and Horticultural Advisor Leslie Hunter Cario. Volunteers are actively involved with plant scouting, seed collection and propagation activities, as well as researching propagation methods. Production of native plants from local ecotypes at Adkins Arboretum was presented by Cario at the American Public Garden Association’s Native Plants and Plant Conservation Symposium held in Boston in October 2017.

Originally founded as Maryland’s state arboretum in 1980, Adkins Arboretum has operated as a non-profit since 1992 and serves as a model for land management that strives to engage all people in conservation, appreciation and enjoyment of the Chesapeake region’s native landscapes through education, recreation, art and community events. Situated adjacent to Tuckahoe State Park, the Arboretum operates and maintains a visitor’s center, 400 acres of meadows, woods and wetlands, and five miles of paths under a 50-year lease with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Its diverse collection includes more than 600 trees, plants, grasses and wildflower species native to the Eastern Shore and the Mid-Atlantic coastal plain. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847.

The Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust is a private foundation that supports ornamental horticulture education and research projects. Funding has been primarily directed toward projects in North America, South America, Central America, the Caribbean and Australia, with $635,000 awarded to 44 organizations in 2017. To learn more, visit adminitrustllc.com/stanley-smith-horticultural-trust/.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum offers educational programs for all ages about nature and gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.