Literary House: Two-Day “Poetry Extravaganza” Celebrates Poets Gwendolyn Brooks and Terrence Hayes

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Gwendolyn Brooks, 1917-2000 – America’s first African American poet laureate

CHESTERTOWN, MD—Washington College will present a two-day Poetry Extravanganza celebrating African-American poets Terrance Hayes and Gwendolyn Brooks on Wednesday and Thursday, Nov. 1-2 at the Rose O’Neill Literary House

Gwendolyn Brooks was America’s first African American poet laureate, as well as the first African American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize. Terrance Hayes has won the National Book Award and a MacArthur Foundation Genius Award, among other acclamations for his poetry. Both will be celebrated on Nov. 1-2 at the Rose O’Neill Literary House, in a two-day event to honor the past and the present of poetry in America.

Hayes will read from his work on Nov. 1 at 4 p.m. at the Lit House. The event celebrating Brooks, 100 years after her birth in 1917, will be held Nov. 2 at 4:30, also at the Lit House. Both events are free and open to the public. At the second event, Hayes will also discuss the influence Brooks’ work and legacy has had on his own poetry.

Terrance Hayes, poet and a MacArthur Foundation Genius Award

One of the most compelling voices in American poetry, Terrance Hayes is the author of five books of poetry: How to Be Drawn (Penguin Books, 2015), longlisted for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry; Lighthead (Penguin Books, 2010), winner of the 2010 National Book Award in Poetry; Wind in a Box (Penguin Books, 2006), winner of a Pushcart Prize; Hip Logic (Penguin Books, 2002), winner of the National Poetry Series, a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award, and runner-up for the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets; and Muscular Music (Carnegie Mellon, 2006), winner of both the Whiting Writers Award and the Kate Tufts Discovery Award. He has been a recipient of many other honors and awards, including a 2014 MacArthur Foundation Genius Award, two Pushcart selections, eight Best American Poetry selections, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation. His poems have appeared in literary journals and magazines including The New Yorker, The American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, Fence, The Kenyon Review, Jubilat, Harvard Review, and Poetry. His poetry has also been featured on PBS NewsHour with Jim Lehrer.

Gwendolyn Brooks was born in 1917. In this, the 100th year since her birth, we celebrate the former poet laureate and the first African American woman to win the Pulitzer Prize, for Annie Allen, her second book of poems. She wrote 20 books of poetry, publishing her first, A Street in Bronzeville (Harper & Brothers) in 1945. She also authored a novel, two autobiographies, and books for children. Her musicality, mastery of tone, gift with received forms like sonnets, and insistence on writing about marginalized people make Brooks one of our most important and relevant poets.

Participants are welcome to bring and read a poem inspired by Brooks, or to read one of their favorites of hers. Hayes will also attend and talk about the influence Brooks had on his work as well as how he developed the form “the golden shovel” based on her work.

For more information on this and other English Department and Sophie Kerr events, visit the the English department’s website or view our annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here. For more information, visit the Literary House website.

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Chocolate for Food Day!

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Hugo Chavez Ayala

October 24 is nationally designated as Food Day—a day to examine how to improve our diets, our foods, and food policies—and Washington College this year is taking on a sweet subject: Chocolate. Hugo Chavez Ayala, co-founder of Agrofloresta Mesoamerica, will discuss cacao cultivation and how the choices we make as consumers of chocolate can affect the people, landscape, and cultures of the countries that grow cacao.

The event at 6:30 p.m. in Hynson Lounge is free and open to the public and will be followed by a chocolate tasting.

Ayala will explain the logistics of cacao cultivation and how the agroforestry system where it grows can have positive social and environmental impacts. He will also discuss the difference between mainstream versus artisanal chocolate, and how the consumer choices can make a difference in the producing countries.

Ayala is an agronomist with a master’s degree in sustainable rural development. After working in academia for several years, he launched Agrofloresta to prove the thesis that it was possible to have a sustainable cacao business in Southern Mexico. Currently, Agrofloresta is working on its second cacao season, exporting fine flavor cacao to the U.S. and Europe, and is exploring the sustainable trade of other products, while benefiting more than 200 farmers with better prices and capacity building.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Environment & Society and the Student Environmental Alliance.

 

Talking About the Tax Man

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Vanessa Williamson

Vanessa Williamson, whose new book  Read My Lips: Why Americans Are Proud to Pay Taxes  argues that Americans view paying their taxes as a moral and civic responsibility, will visit Washington College on Oct. 30 to discuss her work.

The program at 5 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall, is the final installment in this semester’s Louis L. Goldstein Program in Public Affairs. It is free and open to the public.

A Fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings, Williamson studies the politics of redistribution, with a focus on attitudes about taxation. Her work challenges the conventional wisdom that Americans hate taxes, instead positing that Americans view taxpaying as a moral obligation, a sign that one is a contributing member of the community and the nation. Many worry that some people are shirking their tax responsibilities and that government uses their money to benefit the elite few rather than the public interest. Ironically, Williamson argues, the depth of the American civic commitment to taxpaying makes the failures of government, perceived and real, especially potent frustrations.

Williamson is also the author, with Harvard professor Theda Skocpol, of The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism, which examines how the Tea Party pushed the Republican Party farther to the right. The book was named one of the 10 best political books of the year in The New Yorker. Her other work includes examinations of the political origins of the state Earned Income Tax Credit, the electoral effects of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the conditions in which voters have supported state tax increases, and the factors predicting protests against police brutality.

Williamson has testified before Congress and appeared on CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS,” MSNBC’s “The Rachel Maddow Show,” and Al Jazeera America. She has written in a variety of outlets, including a recent op-ed on Donald Trump’s non-payment of taxes in the Sunday edition of The New York TimesTeen Vogue piece on the defense of democracy in America, as well as for The Atlantic, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and her hometown newspaper, The Sacramento Bee. Her work has also been cited by The Economist, the Associated Press, The Washington Post, and on National Public Radio, among other sources.

Williamson previously served as the Policy Director for Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America. She received her Ph.D. in Government and Social Policy from Harvard University. She has a master’s degree from NYU’s Institute of French Studies, and received her B.A. in French language and literature from NYU.

Established in 1990, the Louis L. Goldstein Program in Public Affairs sponsors lectures, symposia, and visiting fellows, student participation in models and conferences, and other projects that bring students and faculty together with leaders experienced in developing public policy. It has hosted journalists, political activists, foreign policy analysts, diplomats, military commanders, and government officials of both national and international stature. Christine Wade, professor of political science and international studies, is its current curator.

 

Mashups, Anansi Trio Headline College Concert Series

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The Mashups

The second half of Washington College’s Fall 2017 concert series begins Oct. 25 with the Mashups, closing out with Anansi Trio on Nov. 2.

Each performance will be in Hotchkiss Recital Hall at the Gibson Centre for the Arts and begins at 7:30. Tickets are $20 (adults), $15 (non-WC College Students/Seniors over age 65/WC faculty and staff), and $12 (1782 Member). WC students and youth 17 and under are free.

On October 25, The Mashups bring their passion for genre bending to the College with a concert that mixes Beyonce with Bizet and couples Porter with Puccini. They break all the rules while taking the audience on an adventure through opera to jazz to musicals to Motown and back again. The Mashups are a trio: Julia Chalfin, who loves opera and the big stage, has made a name for herself in Munich, Germany, as an opera-cabaret performer with original shows such as The Birth of a DivaA Taste of AmericaSopranos-more than just a pretty voice! and Ladies, who Brunch, which she wrote, produced and performed. Cory O’Niell Walker is a diverse performer, composer, and designer who performs in many genres including opera, musical theater, art song and dance. He has also been seen at the Philly Fringe Festival performing his own art-song-based theater works, and he is executive artistic director and co-founder of the Philadelphia-based Artsong Repertory Theater Company, and also performs regularly with The Opera Company of Philadelphia and The Mendelssohn Club Chorus. Matt Brower, a lecturer in piano at Washington College since 2015, is a Philadelphia-based pianist, coach, and educator who brings vision and sensitivity to a variety of genres, from classical piano, chamber music, opera, and art song to musical theatre and jazz.

Anansi Trio

On Nov 2, Washington College welcomes Anansi Trio, a group of like-minded musicians drawing from a wide range of musical influences. Taking their name from a West African trickster spirit associated with storytelling, the trio uses the language of jazz as their starting point. Adding elements of Afro-Cuban and Indian music as well as other global traditions, their sound is deep and diverse. Using percussion, saxophones, and acoustic bass they create a music that’s unique and experimental yet remains accessible. With a strong rhythmic approach and a focus on improvisation, Anansi Trio hopes to put their own stamp on the American legacy known as jazz. The Anansi Trio features Mark Merella (drums), Matt Beltzer (saxophone), and Larry Melton (bass).

Tickets can be purchased with a credit card at washcoll.edu/concert, or with cash or check at the door. Inquiries can be sent to Debbie Reed at concertseries@washcoll.edu or 410-778-7839.

Hopeful Take on Climate Change

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Peterson Toscano

On Friday, October 20, experience the artful, playful, outrageously funny, and deeply moving storytelling craft of Peterson Toscano in his comedic performance, Everything is Connected: A collection of stories, most weird, many true. Connecting issues and ideas to bizarre personal experiences, literature, science, and even the odd Bible story, Peterson transforms right before your eyes into a whole cast of comic characters who explore the serious worlds of gender, sexuality, privilege, religion and environmental justice.

This performance will take place in Decker Theatre at 7 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

As someone concerned with human rights, Toscano has taken on climate change as his primary focus as he considers LGBTQ, faith, and comic responses to the climate crisis. He does not dole out the typical gloom and doom, shame, and guilt global warming messages. Instead, he infuses his work with hope. He challenges audiences to pursue community building as he helps them connect climate change to everything from immigration to a cup of coffee. He curates the Climate Stew Website and is the host of Citizens’ Climate Radio To learn more about Peterson Toscano, visit his website.

For information about the event call Jamie Frees at 410-810-7162 or email  jfrees2@washcoll.edu. This event is sponsored by the Center for Environment & Society at Washington College, the Cater Society of Junior Fellows, Intercultural Ambassadors and Office of Intercultural Affairs, Student Government Association, Student Environmental Alliance, EROS, TaNGO, the Department of Sociology, the Department of Theatre and Dance and the Mid-Shore Maryland Chapter of PLFAG.

Wil Haygood, Patrick Henry Scholar, to Speak Oct. 18

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Patrick Henry Scholar Wil Haygood

In 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy were assassinated, American cities burned, protesters marched at the Democratic National Convention, and black athletes at the Mexico City Olympics brought world-wide attention to the struggle for racial justice. Amid this tumult, 27 young athletes at the segregated East High School in Columbus, Ohio, achieved triumph, winning state championships in basketball and baseball while also sending their debate team to the state finals.

This inspiring story of determination and pride, and the cultural history that surrounds it, is the basis of the upcoming book by author and journalist Wil Haygood, who will discuss Tigerland: The Miracle on East Broad Street on Wednesday, Oct 18 at 5:30 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall, on the Washington College campus. The program, sponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and the Rose O’Neill Literary House, is free and open to the public.

Haygood is the Starr Center’s 2017-18 Patrick Henry Writing Fellow. A cultural historian and award-winning author of seven nonfiction books, he has published biographies on Sammy Davis, Thurgood Marshall, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., and Sugar Ray Robinson. Perhaps most famously, Haygood is the author and co-producer behind the 2013 film The Butler, the story of Eugene Allen, an African American butler who served under eight U.S. presidents, from Truman to Reagan, and received—along with Mr. Haygood—a VIP invitation to President Barack Obama’s inauguration.

While researching his new book, Haygood interviewed most of the athletes, coaches, and students from East Columbus High who were grateful to share their stories. But beyond their individual stories is an epic story of life in a segregated northern city whose schools did not willingly integrate until mandated by a 1979 Supreme Court decision. Haygood relates how the student athletes were inspired by Martin Luther King’s visits to the city, and, in the aftermath of his murder, felt determined to prove that they could overcome racism and segregation through athletic and scholastic competition. Haygood, who grew up in Columbus, remembers watching the teams play, and how their accomplishments united the community.

“The story reached out to me from my past,” he says. “It keeps asking me to dig deeper and deeper into the fabric of our nation’s past. Although it’s about winning against stiff competition, it’s more than a sports book: it’s a cultural history of our country. Writing the book and bringing it across the finish line at the Starr Center means a lot to me. This story is part of the American experience that needs to be told.”

In addition to finishing his book, Haygood will teach a spring semester nonfiction writing workshop focused on memoir offered through Washington College’s English department. He will also host a viewing of The Butler, and lead a student field trip to Allen’s former D.C. row house in November.

Haygood is on sabbatical from Miami University in Ohio, where he serves as Broadway Visiting Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence in the Department of Media, Journalism and Film. He has received fellowships from John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Alicia Patterson Foundation. Before joining the Miami faculty, he was a Boston Globe correspondent and Washington Post reporter.

While in Chestertown, Haygood resides in the restored 1730s-era Patrick Henry House. Washington College acquired the Patrick Henry Fellows’ Residence in January 2007 through a generous gift from the Barksdale-Dabney-Patrick Henry Family Foundation, which was established by the Nuttle family of Talbot County, direct descendants of the patriot Patrick Henry.

Launched by the Starr Center in 2008, the Patrick Henry Fellowship aims to encourage reflection on the links between American history and contemporary culture, and to foster the literary art of historical writing. It is co-sponsored by the Rose O’Neill Literary House, Washington College’s center for literature and the literary arts. The Patrick Henry Writing Fellowship’s funding is permanently endowed by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, with further support provided by the Starr Foundation, the Hodson Trust, and other donors. For more information on the Center and the Patrick Henry Writing Fellowship, visit http://starrcenter.washcoll.edu.

 

 

Lit House Publishes New Chapbook

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Lia Purpura

Washington College’s Literary House Press will launch a new letterpress chapbook titled Scream (or never minding), a Pushcart Prize-winning lyric essay by Baltimore writer Lia Purpura. A celebratory event will be held on Thursday, October 19 at 4:30 p.m. at the Rose O’Neill Literary House, featuring a reading by the author. This event is free and open to the public.

In the LHP publication of Scream, Purpura’s essay is illustrated by Stuart Cawley, whose artistic renderings return both dimension and power to objects—exactly what Purpura enacts with her prose. Her essay explores the unsavory origins of our comfort and convenience—animals driven mad in industrial farms, art that had once been an intimate glimpse into a creator’s vision, objects mass-produced only to be thrown away. All of these are now a “gesture performed over and over, on coffee mugs, tote bags, key chains, and cards, it’s much reduced, quieted so as to be understood. Seeing the scream again and again, we agree not to.” Purpura forces the reader to breach the distance between the dignity of identity and the objectification inherent in a capitalist system, a cause that this publication embodies: every copy of Scream is handmade in the letterpress studio at the Rose O’Neill Literary House, where tools do indeed become “a hand’s extension.”

Purpura is the author of eight collections of essays, poems, and translations. She has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the NEA, and the Fulbright Foundation, in addition to four Pushcart Prizes, a grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, and multiple residencies at several artists’ colonies including MacDowell. Her work has been published and anthologized widely. She lives in Baltimore, where she is currently the Writer in Residence at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She also teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshop in Tacoma, WA.

Scream (or never minding) will be released in two unique editions. The deluxe letterpress edition ($185), which is letterpress-printed and hand-bound in hardcover, will be available at select independent bookstores and direct from the publisher. The standard paperback edition ($15), which is digitally-printed and perfect bound, will be available for purchase through Small Press Distribution, select independent bookstores, and direct from the publisher.

Please contact the Literary House Press (llusby2@washcoll.edu) if you are interested in a review copy.

“Major Barbara” – Professional Production at Washington College – This Weekend Only

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Cast and crew of Major Barbara production at Washington College, Oct6-8, 2017. Front row, left to right: Shannon Lawn, Brendon Fox, Jackie Dulaff, (Patricia Delorey on Skype), Conor Maloney, Rachel Treglia, Tim Maloney, Katie Peacock Back row, left to right: Lex Liang, Cole Capobianco, Lexy Ricketts, Dan Perelstein, Adam Ashcraft, Nate Krimmel, Kelly Young, Colin Higgins, Abby Wargo, John Leslie, Iz Clemens, Laura Eckelman, Kate Moncrief, Giselle Brown, Meghan McPherson, Erin Caine, Nic Job, Tedi Rollins, Victoria Gill, Patrick Salerno, Mark Christie

This weekend is your chance to see a professionally produced production of one of the classics of British theater.  Written in 1905 by George Bernard Shaw, “Major Barbara” has been in theaters almost continuously since then.

Now it’s at Washington College. Each semester there is one play directed by a senior member of the theater department.  This fall Assistant Professor of Theatre, Brendon Fox, is directing one of his personal favorites, and the WC Department of Theatre and Dance has brought in a professional production team to help design the set, sound, costumes, etc.   This gives the students a chance to work with theater professionals and learn professional techniques from the pros while making both friends and contacts. They even have a professional fight choreographer to give those fight scenes a realistic touch!

Professor of Drama Emeritus Timothy Maloney, Washington College, takes the role of rich munitions manufacturer, Andrew Undershaft

This is also a rare opportunity to see one of Chestertown’s finest actors.  Professor of Drama Emeritus, Timothy Maloney, has come out of retirement to play Andrew Undershaft,  the captain of industry and father of Major Barbara.  His wife, Lady Britomart Undershaft, is played by Professor of English Kate Moncrief.  Rachel Treglia, WC class of ’19, takes the title role as Major Barbara Undershaft.

Performances will be in Decker Theater in the Gibson Arts building on the Washington College campus on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings, Oct.5- 7 at 7:30 pm.  There is also a matinee at 2:00 pm on Sunday, Oct. 8. All performances are free.

Kathryn Moncrief, Professor of English and Department Chair, plays Lady Undershaft – photo by Tamzin B. Smith

“Major Barbara” was first staged at the London Royal Court Theatre in 1905. In the USA, it made its Broadway debut at the Playhouse Theatre in 1915, just as World War I was raging in Europe. A 1941 film adaptation starred Rex Harrison, Wendy Hiller and Robert Morley. This film version of Major Barbara was shot in London during the blitz bombing of London in 1940. With explosions going on around them, the cast and crew often had to drop everything and run for the bomb shelters. But producer-director, Pascal didn’t stop the production and, amazingly, the film was finished on schedule. The play was also released as a 4-LP Caedmon Records set in 1965 with Maggie Smith in the title role and Morley reprising his role as Andrew Undershaft. While the play was originally set in the early years of the 20th century, the Washington College production is set in the present day.

“Major Barbara” tells the story of an idealistic young woman, Barbara Undershaft. A Major in the Salvation Army in London, Barbara has devoted her life to helping the poor.  For years, Barbara and the rest of her family have been estranged from their father, Andrew Undershaft, a rich munitions maker.  Ironically, their father is a major supporter of the Salvation Army and has made substantial donations to the organization.  This offends Major Barbara, who objects to his “tainted” wealth. However, the father claims that he is doing more to help society by creating jobs and a steady income for people than the Salvation Army is by feeding them and praying for them. A social satire like many of Shaw’s works, the play uses humor to explore themes of morality, money, and power, often within the family structure.

Rachel Treglia, class of 2019, as Major Barbara – photo by Tamzin B. Smith

Brandon Fox, Assistant Professor of Theatre at Washington College, director for “Major Barbara”- photo by Heather Perry Weafer

Director Brendon Fox received his B.S., Performance Studies at Northwestern University, 1993 and his M.F.A., in Directing at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2009.  He teaches classes on acting, directing, and theater history, among other subjects. His research interests are in Restoration comedy and the adaptation of literature to the stage. In July 2014, Fox directed Two Gentlemen of Verona, for the Houston Shakespeare Festival. In 2016, he adapted the popular, best-selling British novel The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde for a staged reading at Washington College.  This was a world stage-premiere for The Eyre Affair. Author Jasper Fforde came to the college for the premiere and worked with the students in several workshop sessions.

All performances are free.  But reservations are strongly encouraged. Reservations may be made online here up to two hours before each performance. If online reservations are already closed, come to the theater at least 30 minutes early for a ticket, if available, or to have your name placed on the waiting list. The doors open one-half hour before curtain time.  Those with reservations will be allowed to enter first. At five minutes before curtain, house managers will begin admitting patrons from the waiting list. For more information, email theatre_tickets@washcoll.edu and a student worker will respond.

The cast features Professor of Drama Emeritus Timothy Maloney playing Andrew Undershaft and Professor of English Kate Moncrief as Lady Britomart Undershaft, as well as:

 Adam Ashcraft ’19 (Peter Shirley)

Giselle Brown, ’20 (Rummy Mitchens)

Iz Clemens, ’19 (Jenny Hill)

Colin Higgins, ’19 (Charles Lomax)

Nate Krimmel, ’18 (Snobby Price)

John Leslie, ’19 (Stephen Undershaft)

Meghan McPherson, ’19 (Billie Walker)

Conor Maloney, ’19 (Adolphus Cusins)

Lexy Ricketts, ’20  (Sarah Undershaft)

Rachel Treglia, ’19 (Major Barbara Undershaft)

Abby Wargo, ’19 (Mrs. Baines) 

Kelly Young, ’20 (Morrison/Bilton) 

The production and design team includes:

Erin Caine (’19): Dramaturg

Patricia Delorey: Dialect Coach, (Professional-Florida) 

 Lex Liang: Costume & Scenic Designer, (Professional-New York)

Laura Eckelman: Lighting Designer

Dan Perelstein: Co-Sound Designer, (Professional-Philadelphia) 

Mark Christie (’18): Co-Sound Designer 

Claudia Adjou-Moumouni (’18): Music Director 

Cliff Williams III: Fight Choreographer, (Professional-DC) 

Cole Capobianco (’16): Associate Costume Designer, (Alumni &Professional-NJ)

Kaitlyn Peacock (’19): Assistant Scenic Designer & Props Master 

Shannon Lawn (’18): Stage Manager

Jackie Dulaff (’20): Assistant Stage Manager

Nic Job (’21): Assistant Stage Manager 

Victoria Gill (’21) – light board operator

Patrick Salerno (’21) – soundboard operator

Gillian Kelahan (’21) – wardrobe crew

Tedi Rollins (’21) – stage/wardrobe crew

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WC-ALL to Visit Harriet Tubman Country

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On Thursday, Nov. 9, the community is invited to join the Washington College Academy of Lifelong Learning for a day-long excursion to see the results of a 17-year effort to preserve the sights and landscapes associated with Harriet Tubman’s Eastern Shore.

The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park, located 10 miles south of Cambridge in Church Creek, is the destination of the first WC-ALL- sponsored trip of the academic year. The ADA compliant bus will leave Redner’s parking lot in Chestertown at 7:30 a.m. A personal tour guide will board the bus in Dorchester as the group travels on to the new Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center.  Along the way, the guide will point out places and describe events that shaped Harriet Tubman’s life as an enslaved child, young woman, and freedom seeker in the open landscape of the Eastern Shore.

Upon arrival at the Visitor Center, which houses exhibits, a film, a museum store, and a research center, the group will be met by a Park Ranger who will lead a tour of the center and grounds. After lunch on your own at Old Salty’s Restaurant, the driving tour of the Underground Railroad Byway will continue, enroute to the Bucktown Village Store. There young Harriet carried out her first public act of defiance and received a serious blow to the head as she attempted to assist a fellow enslaved male. After a visit to the Harriet Tubman Museum and Education Center in Cambridge, the bus will head back to Chestertown, arriving at approximately 5 p.m.

The cost of the trip is $50. for both WC-ALL members and non-members, and includes transportation, guides, and tips The deadline for reserving a place on the trip is Wednesday, Oct. 25. Make checks payable to WC-ALL and send to WC-ALL, 300 Washington Ave., Chestertown, MD. 21620. Include telephone and email addresses for all who are signing up. For more information about the trip, please call WC-ALL at 410-778-7221.