Walter Shaub, Former Federal Ethics Chief, Speaks at WC April 5

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Walter Shaub, the no-holds-barred, outspoken former director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, will be the guest speaker on April 5 in Washington College’s Holstein Program in Ethics. Shaub, who says that the United States has almost overnight transformed from the international gold standard in ethics to a laughingstock, will speak on “Ethics in Crisis: The Threat to the Government Ethics Program and the Path Forward.”

The free, public event begins at 5 p.m. in Decker Theatre, Gibson Center for the Arts. A reception in the Underwood Lobby will follow the talk.

Shaub, an attorney who first joined the Office of Government Ethics in 2001 and in 2013 was appointed to a five-year term as director by then-President Barack Obama, resigned in protest last year over what he has described as an ethics crisis in the federal government. In an interview with PBS after his resignation, he said that the Trump administration has “set a tone from the top that ethics don’t matter.”

Since his resignation, he has joined the non-partisan Campaign Legal Center, a Washington, D.C., as senior director of ethics. He has also continued to call for tighter ethics rules and more transparency, unleashing his own storms on Twitter, where he calls out instances of dubious ethical behavior in government. In his talk at the College, Shaub will discuss the problem now facing the government’s ethics program, which he argues is the proverbial canary in the coalmine portending even bigger problems to come if left unaddressed. He will also offer his proposals for stemming the erosion of ethics in government.

About the Holstein Program in Ethics

The Holstein Program in Ethics was established in 2014 thanks to the $5 million legacy gift of Richard Holstein ’68, a pediatric dentist. In addition to bringing national leaders in ethics to speak with students and the community about current issues, the program supports and enhances the study of ethics throughout the curriculum and fosters interdisciplinary research on a broad range of ethical issues. Its goal is to spark an appreciation for the importance of moral courage as a foundation for leading a life of purpose and meaning. For more information about the Holstein Program in Ethics see https://www.washcoll.edu/departments/holstein-program/.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Gunston Students Debate World Issues in Washington D.C.

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Gunston’s Model United Nations Club recently returned from the 20th annual Washington Area Model United Nations Conference (WAMUNC) in Washington D.C. Gunston students Neel Patel ’18, Susie Fordi ’18, Dolan Carella ’19, Nick Lee ’19, Sam Umidi ’19, Drew Seaman ’19, Nick Kellogg ’20, Areopl Bai ’20 and Andrew Amygdalos ’20 were lead by faculty advisors Michael McFarland and Woody Granger.

Neel Patel, Susie Fordi, Nick Kellogg, Dolan Carella, Nick Lee, Sam Umidi represented Brazil in various committees.​

WAMUNC is an internationally-renowned Model United Nations conference sponsored by The George Washington University International Affairs Society. Over 1,300 high school students from across the country and around the world attended this four day exercise in diplomacy and international affairs held from March 1 through March 4.

At Model UN conferences, students participate in simulations of United Nations sessions, debating, negotiating, caucusing, drafting, and voting on resolutions that address world problems. Gunston students represented countries Brazil and Somalia in debates on major issues facing the world today, including international cybersecurity, terrorism, child soldiers, and the status of indigenous communities. In their committees, students worked to pass resolutions to address these issues in the same way the United Nations does today.

WC President Kurt Landgraf to Speak at Jones Seminar in American Business Lecture

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Washington College President Kurt Landgraf, whose deep experience in financial accountability, information technology, and integrated business strategies helped place him in the top echelons of corporate America, will give the J.C. Jones Seminar in American Business lecture on March 29.

Hosted by the Department of Business Management and the Sigma Beta Delta Business Honor Society, the free, public lecture begins at 4 p.m. in Decker Theatre, Gibson Center for the Arts, and will be followed by a reception in the Underwood Lobby.

Landgraf, a former senior executive who was named president of Washington College in May of 2017, discusses his “situational” approach to the diverse leadership positions that he’s held throughout his career. Whether driving sales at DuPont Merck or resuscitating the failing Educational Testing Service, Landgraf has adopted different leadership approaches to achieve the desired outcome while operating consistently within a framework of corporate or institutional social responsibility. Whatever environment he’s in, Landgraf abides by three core values: 1. On performance, no excuses; 2. Everybody deserves special treatment; and 3. businesses are social institutions. Distilled to its essence, it simply means doing the right thing.

Landgraf has a decades-long resume as a senior executive with DuPont, including serving as Chief Operating Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chairman of DuPont Europe Middle East and Africa, Chairman and CEO of DuPont Pharmaceutical Company and CEO of DuPont Merck Company. His 13-year tenure as President and CEO of Educational Testing Service (ETS), helped revive the world’s largest private educational testing and measurement organization and leader in educational research.

The James C. Jones, Jr. Seminar in American Business was endowed in 1978 by the George W. King Printing Company in memory of its former company president who was a graduate of Washington College and served on its Board of Visitors and Governors.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Michael Nettles to Speak at Community Meeting on March 28

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Washington College President Kurt Landgrafis pleased to announce that Michael Nettles, a national leader on educational assessment and equity, will take part in a Kent County community meeting on March 28 to talk about progress in Kent County schools. Nettles, the Senior Vice President and the Edmund W. Gordon Chair of Education Testing Service’s (ETS) Policy Evaluation & Research Center, will speak on “Signs of Pride and Prosperity: Sustaining Educational Progress in Kent County.”

The community meeting will be held at Kent County High School starting at 6:30 p.m. The following day, Nettles will offer his expertise during an exchange of ideas with Kent County’s school administrators, teachers, and staff.

“Our public schools are our community’s future economically, socially—really, in every way,” says Landgraf, who served as 13 years as CEO and president of ETS. “Everything that we can do to support our schools, the students, staff, and faculty, works toward making that future brighter for all of Kent County. I’m so pleased that Michael Nettles is coming here to offer his extensive insight and expertise, and that Kent County Schools administrators and faculty are excited to welcome him.”

Karen M. Couch, Superintendent of Kent County Schools, says she’s “thrilled to host Dr. Nettles for this event. The opportunity to have someone of his caliber speak to the educational investments and innovations that the Kent County Board of Education and County Commissioners have embraced will be a turning point in our community. Anyone interested in learning more about what the Kent County Public Schools is doing and how it will positively impact student achievement needs to attend.”

Nettles has a national reputation as a policy researcher on educational assessment, student performance and achievement, and educational equity. His publications reflect his broad interest in public policy, student and faculty access, opportunity, achievement, and assessment at the K–12 and postsecondary levels.

In August 2014 President Barack Obama appointed Nettles to the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans. He was appointed by two U.S. Secretaries of Education to serve on the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB), which oversees and develops policies for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He also served for eight years on both the College Board of Trustees and the GRE® Board.

A native of Nashville, Tenn., Nettles earned his bachelor’s degree in political science at the University of Tennessee. He went on to receive master’s degrees in political science and higher education, and a Ph.D. in education at Iowa State University.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

St. Anne’s Episcopal School Faculty Offer Camp for Children

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St. Anne’s Episcopal School is pleased to announce a summer camp program for children ages 3 to 13 led by St. Anne’s faculty in 2018.  Four themed weeks of day camp including Nature, Sea & Sky, Risky Business, and Anything Goes, will operate from 8:30am to 3:30pm for the weeks of June 18-22, June 25-29, July 9-13, and July 16-20 at a rate of $275 per week, with a $25 discount for complete registrations received before March 29.  Interested families may visit www.StAnnesDE.org/summer to learn more.

“We are thrilled to offer enriching summer opportunities that include outdoor exploration on St. Anne’s 125-acre campus, tinkering, crafts, cooking and even NASA-sponsored STEM sessions to the greater community for children as young as three years old,” said Summer Camp Co-Director Meghan Ferster, “Morning and afternoon sessions are led by our wonderful St. Anne’s faculty.  Missy Derabertis, Allison DeFino, Stacie Emerson, Kathy Hanna, Bethany Otwell, April Smallwood, and Kirsten Swift are leading multiple camp sessions.”

“I am excited to lead children in fun projects  like STEM structures that can withstand earthquake forces, a “Viking vs. Pirate” boat building contest, designing the ultimate treasure map, and constructing a catapult,” added Bethany Otwell, St.  Anne’s Middle School STEM teacher and Camp Co-Director. “Every week offers new adventures and opportunities for learning.”

At St. Anne’s Episcopal School, the goal is  to open the hearts and minds of each student — through academic excellence, spiritual development, and a small, family-oriented and diverse community. St. Anne’s is a co-ed independent day school for children in Preschool (age 3) through grade 8. Founded by visionary educators from St. Andrew’s School in 2002,  the academic program prepares students for honors course work in the finest area high schools through its commitment to intellectual, spiritual, physical, social, and artistic growth and character development.

Political Strategist Sean Rapelyea to Speak at WC March 26

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Sean Rapelyea ’08, who has worked for the campaigns of Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and now Illinois gubernatorial candidate J.B. Pritzker, will return to campus on March 26 as part of the Goldstein Program’s Young Alumni Series.

Rapelyea’s talk, which begins at 5 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, will encompass his burgeoning career in politics, having worked as a field organizer for the Obama and Clinton presidential campaigns, as well as an assistant to Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. As all eyes turn toward the 2018 midterm elections, he’ll share his insight into how campaigns and politics at the local level of government, whether in rural or urban areas, will shape the fortunes of Democratic candidates this fall.

The talk is free and open to the public.

Rapelyea is currently the political director for Illinois gubernatorial candidate J.B. Pritzker. He previously served as Illinois political director for the Hillary For America campaign during the general election, where she garnered a 17–point win margin. Rapelyea also served as deputy director of government affairs for the Office of the Mayor in Chicago after working as a regional field director and advisor to Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s 2011 and 2015 re-election campaigns. In 2010, he worked on Arkansas Senator Blanche Lincoln’s primary, runoff, and general election campaigns. He began his campaign work with then-Senator Barack Obama’s Campaign for Change, working in Missoula, Montana.

Rapelyea, who majored in English, says a minority politics class taught by Christine Wade, professor of political science and international studies, during his junior year “really opened my mind and sparked my interest in electoral politics.”

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Kent School Student Named National Geographic State Bee Semifinalist

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Flynn Bowman, and eighth grade student at Kent School, has been notified by the National Geographic Society that he is one of the semifinalists eligible to compete in the 2018 Maryland National Geographic State Bee. The contest will be held at Maryland Public Television Studios in Owings Mills on Friday, April 6, 2018.

Kent School’s school level bee was held on January 12 with 16 participants from grades 4-8. After several rounds of questions on national and international geography, Flynn emerged the winner. School geography bee coordinator and seventh grade geography teacher, Michelle Cerino said, “We are so proud of Flynn. Flynn works hard and is always prepared for the task at hand. It is gratifying to see his hard work rewarded on larger stage.” Nancy Mugele, Head of Kent School said, “Flynn always represents Kent School at a very high level. I have no doubt he will make us proud as he competes on April 6.” Mugele continued, “Kent School has a solid track record of students who qualify to compete in the Maryland State Geo Bee. This affirms our mission to offer our students a global curriculum starting with our youngest students that includes geography, art, music, foreign language and social studies.”

For more information about Kent School visit www.kentschool.org, email tcammerzell@kentschool.org or call 410-778-4100 ext. 110. Kent School, located in historic Chestertown, MD is an independent day school serving boys and girls from Preschool through Grade 8. The School’s mission is to guide our students in realizing their potential for academic, artistic, athletic, and moral excellence. Our school’s family-oriented, supportive, student-centered environment fosters the growth of honorable, responsible citizens for our country and our diverse world.

This is the second level of the National Geographic Bee competition, which is now in its 30th year. School Bees were held in schools with fourth- through eighth-grade students throughout the state to determine each school champion. School champions then took a qualifying test, which they submitted to the National Geographic Society. The National Geographic Society has invited up to 100 of the top-scoring students in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Department of Defense Dependents Schools and U.S. territories to compete in the State Bees.

To celebrate the 30th annual National Geographic Bee, the cash prize for the top three students in each state has doubled. Each state champion will receive $200, the National Geographic Visual Atlas of the World, 2nd Edition and a trip to Washington, D.C., to represent their state in the National Geographic Bee Championship to be held at National Geographic Society headquarters, May 20-23, 2018. Students that come in second place will receive $150 and those that come in third will receive $100. The first-place national champion will receive a $50,000 college scholarship, a lifetime membership in the Society, including a subscription to National Geographic magazine, and an all-expenses-paid Lindblad expedition to the Galápagos Islands aboard the new National Geographic Endeavour ll. Travel for the trip is provided by Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic. Second- and third-place finishers will receive $25,000 and $10,000 college scholarships, respectively. Visit www.natgeobee.org for more information on the National Geographic Bee.

National Geographic will stream the final round of the National Geographic Bee Championship starting May 24, 2018, at www.natgeobee.org.

How would you fare as a National Geographic Bee contestant? At the school Bees this year, students had to answer questions like these:

1. The Appalachian Mountains run through which state—Georgia or Mississippi?
A. Georgia

2. The North Platte and South Platte Rivers meet in which state—New Mexico or Nebraska?
A. Nebraska

3. Which state straddles the Tropic of Cancer—Hawaii or Alaska?
A. Hawaii

4. Which form of mass production was used by Henry Ford to produce automobiles in large quantities in Detroit, Michigan—threshing machine or assembly line?
A. assembly line

Acclaimed Author Jack Bohrer to Speak at WC March 20

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This year marks the 60th anniversary of the assassination of political icon Robert F. Kennedy. On Tuesday, March 20, John R. “Jack” Bohrer ’06, news producer at MSNBC and author of The Revolution of Robert Kennedy: From Power to Protest after JFK, will return to campus to discuss his acclaimed book. The recently published work examines three critical years in the life of Robert Kennedy, just after his brother John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

The event will begin at 5:30 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall, and will be followed by a book signing. Sponsored by the Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and the Department of Political Science, the program is free and open to the public.

Bohrer’s book grew out of his political science senior thesis at Washington College in 2006. He also worked on the project as one of the first student fellows at the Starr Center, writing at a desk in the Custom House. Speaking of his upcoming visit to Chestertown, Bohrer says: “Adam Goodheart and the Starr Center took me on my first archives trip and gave me hands-on experience with historical research, so this is a homecoming for me.”

The Revolution of Robert Kennedy argues that RFK—a less-than-charismatic attorney general and JFK’s reputed hatchet man—was transformed by the events of 1963 and their aftermath, and that he emerged from that crucible the champion of the dispossessed who captured Americans’ collective imagination.

Published by Bloomsbury last June, Bohrer’s first book has received rave reviews. Matt Bai, one of the country’s finest political pundits, declared The Revolution of Robert Kennedy “fast-paced and full of new detail” and said it “signals the arrival of an unusually gifted writer and historian.”  Kirkus Reviews described it as a “poignant sketch of a lost champion of social justice from an age when it could still be said that ‘politics is still the greatest and most honorable adventure.’”

“I couldn’t be more excited to welcome Jack back to campus,” says Goodheart, the Starr Center’s Hodson Trust-Griswold director. “Washington College can be proud of the contributions that this exceptional young alumnus is making in the fields of both journalism and history. And we can be especially proud that his important work on RFK began here in Chestertown.”

A reporter, historian, and television producer for MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” Bohrer has helped produce high-profile interviews, including with nearly every major 2016 presidential candidate. His research has been cited by the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Boston Globe, and his writing has appeared in New York magazine, The New Republic, Politico, and USA Today, among others. In addition to Washington College faculty, two of his mentors on the RFK project were former senator Birch Bayh and the late political journalist Richard Ben Cramer, both senior fellows of the College.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

St. Anne’s Episcopal School Announces $2.3 Million Capital Campaign

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St. Anne’s Episcopal School is pleased to announce that nearly $1.9 million have been raised in support of a $2.3 million Open Hearts, Open Minds capital campaign, the first since the school opened its doors in 2002.  At the Founders’ Circle Party celebrating donors and volunteers on February 23rd, Head of School Peter Thayer formally announced the campaign, which will be used to upgrade the St. Anne’s campus for the future, support and retain world class educators, and expand the school’s financial aid program by adding $1 million to the endowment.  Less than 18% of the campaign remains to be raised.

“In this next phase of the campaign we invite parents, alumni, and friends of the school to participate so that we can be our best over the next decade,” Mr. Thayer said.  “With this generous and transformational giving, teachers can become even better educators, our campus will have the best and most current spaces for students to create, explore, and innovate, and even more children can walk through our red doors.”

Members of the St. Anne’s Episcopal School Board of Trustees and Capital Campaign Committee

Thayer explained some of the changes that have already begun at St. Anne’s as a result of this campaign, including the introduction of the Singapore Math program, the Superkids Early Literacy Program, the creation of an Innovation Lab, the expansion of after school programs, and a significant investment in faculty professional development.  New construction of a Middle School music room will provide better acoustics as well as easy access to instruction in multiple instruments, rehearsal, and recording in the school’s instrumental program.

Foundations and donors that are already supporting the capital campaign include The Longwood Foundation, The Chichester duPont Foundation, the Crestlea Foundation, the Crystal Trust, the Welfare Foundation,and current and former faculty, staff, parents and grandparents at the school.  The St. Anne’s Board of Trustees and Capital Campaign Committee have contributed $800,000 to the campaign.

“We are honored to partner with our donors to accomplish the most lasting and important action we can take for the future: educating the next generation,” said St. Anne’s Board of Trustees President, Ana Ramirez. “Together, we are growing the heart, mind and spirit of each child here!”

Located in Middletown, DE, St. Anne’s Episcopal School (www.stannesde.org) is a Preschool (age 3) through Grade 8 co-ed independent day school that focuses on academic excellence and spiritual growth in a small, family-oriented and diverse community. Founded by visionary educators from St. Andrew’s School in 2002, the school’s academic program prepares students for honors course work in the finest area high schools through its commitment to intellectual, spiritual, physical, social, and artistic growth and character development.