Aztecs to Zentangle ™ – WC-ALL Covers it All in 26 Courses

Share

Here they are!  The Washington College -Academy of Lifelong Learning Fall 2017 Courses.  The registration deadline is Tuesday, August 22.  There are two sessions.  Session 1 runs from Sept 5 to October 13.  Session 2 starts on October 22 and runs through December 8.

Session 1 (September 5 – October 13*)

  • “Hidden Treasures” Movies, Part I – Nancy Hartman (Sunday)
  • Virginia Woolf’s “To the Lighthouse”: A Close Reading – Jim Block (Monday)
  • Spies, Codebreakers & Deception Artists – Mike Roberts (Monday)
  • Counter Parts – Jane Hukill/Dick Hawkins (Tuesday)
  • Aztecs & Incas: Their Cultures & the Spanish ConquestJ. Sherbondy/G. Shivers (Tuesday)
  • They Also Ran: 19th Century Presidential Losers – Conway Gregory (Wednesday)
  • When Poetry & Music Meet – Jay & Sierra Stearns (Wednesday)
  • Current Topics in BusinessWashington College Dept. of Business Mgmt Faculty (Wednesday)
  • Darwin & Darwinism – John Ames/Don Munson (Thursday)
  • iPhone Photography-A Gentle Introduction – Dick Lance (Thursday)
  • Bond and Beyond – John Wieczoreck (Thursday)
  • The Magic of the Opera XIV – AIDA – Judie Oberholtzer (Friday)
  • Gun Control & the Second Amendment – James Astrachan (Friday)

Session 2 (October 22 – December 8*)

  • “Hidden Treasures” Movies, Part II – Nancy Hartman (Sunday)
  • Zentangle ™ Drawing – Charlotte Hawes (Monday)
  • Middle East Outlook: 2017 & Beyond – “Great” Again?! – Pat Patterson (Monday)
  • Stories of Knightly Combat & Courtly Love – Jim Campbell (Tuesday)
  • Talking About Islam – Sue Kenyon (Tuesday)
  • Why We Do What We DO – Ralph Surette (Tuesday)
  • Ancient Middle East & Egypt Through Their Art – Beverly Hall Smith (Wednesday)
  • Notable & Notorious American Men – Lucia Rather (Wednesday)
  • Learn to Edit Your Photos to Create Your Own “Masterpiece” – Steve Kane (Wednesday)
  • Windows 10-A Gentle Introduction – Dick Lance (Thursday)
  • Climate Change: A Primer on an Unfolding Disaster – Ben Orrick (Thursday)
  • The Music of James Bond – John Wieczoreck (Thursday)
  • The Supreme Court: Top Hits of the 2016 Term – John Christie (Friday)

The full catalog and registration information are available on the WC-ALL website.or call 410-778-7221.

Showcase is Thursday, August 17 at 4:00 pm at the Hotchkiss Recital Hall on the Washington College Campus. Learn about each course and meet instructors.  Refreshments will be served; all are welcome. Registration by web or mail-in begins on August 1 and closes on August 22, and may also be done at Showcase.

*No classes held Labor Day weekend or the week of Thanksgiving.

WC-All Registration Deadline Tuesday, August 22

Kent County Public Library Board of Trustees Seeks New Members

Share

The Board of Trustees of the Kent County Public Library is seeking potential nominees to replace two trustees whose terms will be ending on December 31, 2017.

By Maryland Law, the Board of Trustees consists of seven members appointed by the county governing body (the Kent County Commissioners) from nominees submitted by the Board of Trustees. Members are chosen on the basis of character, ability, and a demonstrated interest in library matters. Members of the board must be representative of the area the library serves and residents of Kent County. Trustees are appointed for an initial term of five years.

Interest forms are now being accepted by the Kent County Public Library Board of Trustees from citizens who wish to serve as a member of the board. The form is available on the library’s website or at any Kent County Public Library location.

Completed forms can be sent to kcpltrusteesearch@kent.lib.md.us or mailed to:

Kent County Public Library Board of Trustees, 408 High St., Chestertown, MD 21620

Interest forms must be submitted by September 15, 2017.  All submissions will be considered by the Trustees.

Kent County Public Library front entrance – Chestertown Branch

Special KCPS Board of Education Meeting Aug. 17

Share

Notice: The Kent County Public Schools Strategic Planning Committee is holding a special meeting for the purpose of discussing long term facilities planning.  The meeting will be held on Thursday, August 17, 2017, at 4:30 PM.  The meeting will be held at the H.H. Garnet Elementary School, 320 Calvert Street, Chestertown, MD 21620.

Board of Education members are Trish McGee (President), A. Bryan Williams (Vice President), Jeff Reed, Dr. Wendy Costa, and Joseph Goetz.

Washington College Academy of Life-Long Learning Invites Community to Fall Showcase

Share

Fall semester courses and upcoming special events for Washington College’s Academy of Lifelong Learning will be showcased at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 17 at the Hotchkiss Recital Hall on the college campus. The program is free and open to the public, and no reservations are required.

Showcase is an opportunity for WC-ALL current and potential members to learn about fall semester classes from the instructors themselves as each presents a brief overview of his or her course. At a reception afterwards, there will be an opportunity to meet instructors personally, ask questions, discuss classes in more depth, and enjoy refreshments and conversation with fellow learners.

Twenty-six courses will be offered over two six-week sessions, running September 5 – October 13 and October 22 – December 8, with no classes Labor Day weekend or the week of Thanksgiving. Courses range from history to music, the environment to photography, foreign policy, literature, movies, and more. Click here for fall catalog and registration information or call 410-778-7221. Registration and course selection begins on August 1 and closes on August 22, and may also be done at Showcase.

Founded in 1992 and now in its 25th year, WC-ALL was created for adults who seek intellectual stimulation without requirements for educational credit. There are neither age nor academic restrictions to membership. Each semester approximately 400 members register for as many classes as they wish for one inclusive fee.

Come and Learn – WC-ALL Offers 26 Fall Semester Courses

Share

 

The Washington College Academy of Lifelong Learning, a continuing education program for adult learners, has announced its schedule of 26 courses for the fall semester, which runs from September 5 to December 8.

Each semester, approximately 400 people join WC-ALL and register for as many classes as they wish for one inclusive membership fee. Courses are taught by community members with interesting life experiences and expertise in a wide variety of fields. There are no educational requirements for membership and no papers or exams!

New Curriculum Chair Ed Minch and wife Shelley chat with a member.

Ed Minch, WC-ALL’s new curriculum chair, has put together an outstanding team of new and returning instructors and stimulating topics for both 6-week sessions. With a few exceptions, classes begin at 4:15 p.m. and are held on the Washington College campus.

Highlights of Session One, which begins September 5, include Judie Oberholtzer’s popular “Magic of the Opera” with a trip to the Kennedy Center for a performance of “Aida”. Movies will be featured in “Hidden Treasure Movies, Part 1” by Nancy Hartman and “Bond and Beyond” by John Wieczoreck. “Current Topics in Business” will be taught by members of the Washington College Department of Business Management and will explore a different topic each week, ranging from finance to strategy to information systems and their impact on local and global communities as well as our personal lives. You can also learn about 19th Century presidential losers, poetry and music, Virginia Woolf’s “To the Lighthouse”, the culture of Aztecs and Incas, and much more.

Session Two runs from October 22 to December 8, and offers learners the opportunity to explore the politics, religion, and art of the Middle East with “Middle East Outlook: 2017 & Beyond – Great Again?!” taught by Pat Patterson, “Ancient Middle East and Egypt Through Their Art” by Beverly Hall Smith, and “Talking About Islam” by Sue Kenyon. A perennial favorite, “The Supreme Court: Top Hits” taught by John Chrisite, returns with an examination of several key cases heard during the 2016 term. There will also be classes in digital photo editing, Windows 10, knightly combat and courtly love, and climate change, among many others.

In addition to sponsoring fall and spring classes, WC-ALL hosts a series of Learn at Lunch lectures open to the community, as well as special-event trips. To learn more, visit WC-ALL’s table at the Chestertown Farmers’ Market on August 5 and 12, and plan to attend the Fall Showcase on Thursday, August 17 at 4:00 p.m. in Hotchkiss Recital Hall on the Washington College campus. Click here for the full course catalog and registration information or call 410-778-7221 for more information. Registration for both fall sessions runs from August 1 until August 22.

WC-ALL is always seeking community members who have a special interest to share and would like to explore teaching a class in future sessions. Proposals for spring 2018 can be submitted between September 1 and October 15. Check out the WC-ALL website or call the WC-ALL office at 410-778-7221 for more information.

Horizons Students Celebrate Summer Success

Share

Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s—a summer academic and enrichment program for promising students with limited economic means—held the 2017 Closing Day Awards Ceremony and Student Presentations today at Radcliffe Creek School, its Kent County summer campus. At the ceremony, board members, staff, and families honored students’ summer success with awards, while students presented their summer projects—demonstrating the measurable value of Horizons’ evidence-based learning methodology. Through this coveted summer opportunity, Horizons students gain not only academic achievements, but return to school with confidence, preparedness, and a desire to learn.

“Over the summer, disadvantaged children tread water at best or even fall behind,” said executive director Bob Parks. “Known as the ‘Summer Slide,’ it is often a predictor of truancy, high school drop-out rates, eventual unemployment—and worse. Today, we recognize and honor these students’ accomplishments this summer. They will return to school this Fall armed with confidence and preparedness that will allow them to achieve academic success during the school year and beyond.”

Since 1995, the Horizons summer learning program has served hundreds of Kent and Queen Anne’s County children at or below the poverty level, as part of a national initiative to reduce the summer slide. The six-week program headquartered at The Gunston School, Radcliffe Creek School, and Washington College, serves 180 promising local students from Pre-K through eighth grade.

Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s is one of 51 affiliates of the Horizons National summer learning program that focuses on reading, writing, and math. Students improve academically, learn to swim, and participate in activities that foster creativity, confidence, and good health.

For more information, visit the Horizons web site .

Exploring We Will Go! Horizons Visits Smith Island

Share

 

Island Visit Creates “Memories of a Lifetime” for Kids Who Rarely Travel Beyond Kent County

Chestertown, MD (July 20, 2017)—Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s—a summer academic and enrichment program for promising students with limited economic means—sent its entire middle school class on the program’s first-ever three-day learning excursion to Smith Island, Maryland. This life-altering trip provided Horizons students—who seldom have the means or opportunity to leave Kent County—with a rare view into a much different island world. Students got a firsthand glimpse into Smith Island’s unique maritime culture, including crabbing, traditional watercraft, wildlife, and island life past and present. Students also planned and helped prepared all their meals. The trip was made possible thanks to a generous grant from the John Ben Snow Foundation.

“This trip enabled our middle schoolers to experience the beauty and importance of island life in Maryland,” explains Horizons Executive Director, Bob Parks. “Many of our students have never traveled anywhere overnight, so a three-day trip to this historic island creates memories for these kids that will last a lifetime. It was life-changing for them. ”

 Located in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay, this tiny three-by-five mile island chain boasts three villages and a total population of 350 year-round residents. Almost everything and everyone that comes to Smith Island arrives by boat—including locals, visitors, and supplies. Captain John Smith first charted the archipelago in 1608, but seasonal occupation by Native Americans goes back more than 12,000 years.

About Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s

Since 1995, the Horizons summer learning program has served hundreds of Kent and Queen Anne’s County children at or below the poverty level, as part of a national initiative to reduce the summer slide. The six-week program headquartered at The Gunston School, Radcliffe Creek School, and Washington College, serves 180 promising local students from Pre-K through eighth grade.

 Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s is one of 51 affiliates of the Horizons National summer learning program that focuses on reading, writing, and math. Students improve academically, learn to swim, and participate in activities that foster creativity, confidence, and good health.

For the latest Horizons news, please visit Horizon’s web site

LIKE US on Facebook, and FOLLOW US on Twitter.

###

Kent County Board of Ed to Hold Special Meeting Aug 3

Share

The Kent County School Board of Education is holding a special meeting for the purpose of approving personnel and a QZAB bid.  The meeting will be held on Thursday, August 3, 2017, at 4:00 pm.  The meeting will be held at the Kent County Board of Education Administration Building, 5608 Boundary Avenue, Rock Hall, MD  21661.

AGENDA

ACTION A.  Approval of Agenda

ACTION B.  Move to Closed Session in accordance with SGA 10-

      508(a)(1)(ii) to discuss personnel matters

                    C.  Report on Closed Session

ACTION        D.  Personnel Actions

ACTION E.  QZAB Bids

ACTION F.  Adjourn

Washington College Gets $1 Million Gift for Classical Studies

Share

Andrea Trisciuzzi, vice president for college advancement, accepts two checks totaling over $1 million from William Creager, executor of the estate of a couple who made the gift anonymously to Washington College.

A couple who visited Chestertown regularly for over 30 years has bequeathed more than $1 million to Washington College as an endowment for the study of the Classical world. The couple, who chose to remain anonymous for their gift, were not college alumni, although they were members of The 1782 Society, the college’s leadership giving society, and often attended events on campus.

“They enjoyed Chestertown and the influence the College had on the quality of life here,” says a local resident, also choosing anonymity, who was friends with the pair for some 50 years. “They particularly enjoyed the Washington College Concert Series every year.”

The donors intend for the bequest to encourage development of new academic opportunities and to sustain the work of faculty members already involved in areas of study related to the Classical world. The funds could support the hiring of instructors; library materials; new and existing courses in the literature, history, art, philosophy, or religion (including the study of mythology) of the Classical world; faculty research; and honoraria and expenses for visiting lecturers.

“The study of the Classical world has always been a key component of a liberal arts education,” said Patrice DiQuinzio, Provost and Dean of the college, “and we are thrilled to have this fund to support the work of Washington College faculty who teach courses related to that era.”

“This is truly a remarkable and generous gift,” said college President Kurt M. Landgraf. “It’s clear that Washington College connects with people in sometimes unexpected ways that remind us why we do what we do. The relationship between the college and the town of Chestertown is strong, with powerful potential. This couple saw a local opportunity to affect generations to come, in a meaningful way, and we are deeply grateful.”