WHEE partnered with Kent County Schools

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Last Fall, WHEE partnered with Kent County Schools, community organizations, and individuals to create the Make a Movement Project, a performance art project about climate change and the effects of heat-trapping gases on our planet. Please check out the video that shows the community’s involvement in the project and events.

WHEE’s Make a Movement project is now creating a parachute with the First Day Friends Meeting of Washington, DC and facilitating leaders to create parachute projects at Salisbury University, in Stamford, Conn., Pomona, NY, Sunderland, Mass., Benga, Malawi, and El Menzel, Morocco.

Inspired by the AIDS quilt, first displayed in 1987 to raise awareness about the disease, the call for Parachutes For The Planet is for individuals and communities to create their own parachute to raise awareness of the effects of climate change and living sustainably. All parachutes will be gathered for an exhibition on the Mall in Washington DC and then toured around the US and internationally. Check out the website for details.

Director of WHEE, Hope Clark, is working with Allen Fawsett, the Chief at the Environmental Protection Agency, Climate Economic Branch who’s team wrote the Paris Agreement and created the archived EPA Student Guide to Global Warming used by the Make a Movement project in Kent County, MD.

Perhaps you know an environmental club or group in your neighborhood who would like to participate? For more information and support contact@wheelbarrowproductions.org

The Beauty of Making a Mosaic with KCHS Students

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There’s a lot of cutting glass this week at Kent County High School. That’s glass, with a “g.”

Throughout the week students have been cutting and gluing pieces of colored glass, mirror, and other material together to complete a complex glass mosaic with the hope of expressing a sense of place in their personal lives and the greater culture and beauty of the natural environment of Kent County.

The 6’ x 10’ mosaic, with a central tree motif with roots and branching limbs, is surrounded by clusters of images symbolizing elements that invigorate life on our part of the Eastern Shore. A blue crab, the white sails of Sultana, a winding river are just a few of the images that appear in the glinting formation.

“The roots of the tree represent our rich past, and the branches express our sense of all the possibilities life offers,” Spencer said.

The project idea was discussed two years ago by KCHS Fine Arts Department Chair and Visual Arts Teacher Stephanie Spencer and art advocate Tom McHugh during a period when the school system was enduring systemic changes in the county and looking for programs to underscore the positive. Never losing sight of wanting the project to happen, Spencer sought and received a state grant to cover half the cost. Along with fundraising help from Sultana’s “Evening With the Arts” and other school groups, the mosaic was finally greenlighted.

Sue Stockman and Stephanie Spencer and students

Spencer looked to practicing artist and arts advocate Sue Stockman to oversee the project. Stockman, an accomplished artist in her own right, has overseen over two-dozen mosaic projects throughout the state from Baltimore’s inner city to rural Talbot County and St. Michaels high schools, and to each, she brings a special sensibility of inclusion, equality, and respect of each other. She knows first-hand the therapeutic quality and joy of collaborative artistic endeavors having worked on mosaic projects in schools where students have suffered trauma from violence. The creative projects also give the students a space to come together and share in a mutual accomplishment far away from the white-noise of social media and anxiety of 24/7 news cycles.

“We start each session talking about our lives and the project. Everyone gets to speak as we try to create a culture of kindness so that we can begin to work together helping and encouraging each other along the way,” Stockman says. “I’m passionate about wanting to bring a sense of aesthetics into schools, to cut through some of the institutional coldness of them.”

As students circled the mosaic—another way of including everyone in the creative effort—they clipped and cut the jigsaw pieces of glass needed to follow Stockman’s underlying design. Each student was drawn to different aspects of the design, but all took part in the overall drive to complete it.

Well into its sixth day Thursday, the image was almost complete, but work was still needed to meet their 8 pm deadline and help, they hoped, would arrive from community members answering their invitation.

The mosaic will eventually be placed on the exterior of the building as a sparkling example of what can be accomplished by students unified by a common artistic goal. Hopefully, they will carry the spirit of collaboration with them.

The project was funded through the support of the Maryland State Arts Council and the Kent County Arts Council.

Spring Arts Celebration at Kent School

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The Visual and Performing Arts program at Kent School will be in the spotlight at the opening of the Spring Arts Celebration on April 25. The public is invited to attend a Chorus performance, hear selections from the upcoming Eighth Grade Musical, Shrek, Jr. and view the All School Art Show. The opening performance begins at 6:00 pm and admission is free. Following the performance, guests are invited to view art on display throughout the school. Light refreshments will be served.

Nancy Mugele, Head of Kent School said, “A rich and diverse visual and performing arts curriculum is essential to the fulfillment of our mission which is to guide children in reaching their potential for academic, artistic, athletic and moral excellence. Our Spring Arts Celebration is a testament to that commitment.” Music teacher, Kate Bennett has been working with students in every grade level at Kent School to prepare for the event. Lower School students will sing and third grade students will play recorders. Following those grade specific performances, the Kent School Chorus, an after-school program which is open to students from grades three through eight will perform. Following the Chorus performance, members for the Eighth Grade will perform a song from their upcoming musical, Shrek, Jr. Performance dates for Shrek, Jr, are May 11 and 12 at 7:30 pm. This performance is also free and the public is invited to attend.

Examples of student artwork from Preschool through Grade 8 will be on display throughout the halls of the school. Guests are invited to view the art following the musical performances. The Visual Arts curriculum at Kent School covers a wide array of media, themes, and subjects. Student work will include ceramics, mobiles, sculpture, painting, charcoal and more. Art class is frequently integrated with language arts, social studies, science or history classes. Pat Parkhurst, Art Teacher at Kent School said, “I really enjoy collaborating with my colleagues and I intentionally bring topics from history, science and literature into art. Students have a more meaningful understanding of what may inspire artists or styles of art. We know from our mind, brain and education science research, that this multi-modality teaching inspires deeper learning for all students.”

Mugele continued, “We are proud to highlight our students’ accomplishments in the arts. We truly believe that creative thought and creative problem solving are skills that must be cultivated for success as our students move into higher learning and future careers. Secondly, the connections made by students through our interdisciplinary approach to arts integration enhances learning.”

For more information about the Arts Celebration at Kent School, visit www.kentschool.org or call 410-778-4100 ext. 110. Kent School, located in historic Chestertown, MD is an independent day school serving children from Preschool through Grade 8. The School’s mission is to guide our students in realizing their potential for academic, artistic, athletic, and moral excellence. Our school’s family-oriented, supportive, student-centered environment fosters the growth of honorable, responsible citizens for our country and our diverse world.

Senior Capstone Exhibition 2018 at the Kohl Gallery

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Cityscape by Austin Maddux

The Kohl Gallery is pleased to announce the Senior Capstone Exhibition 2018, which features the work of graduating seniors in the Department of Art and Art History and opens with a reception on April 19.

“The Breadth Between” features the Senior Capstone Projects of seven seniors, whose art presents topics ranging from gender politics to cityscapes, and from visualizing inner emotions to investigating the absurd.

Seniors Morgan Bench, Annie Grosscup, Julie Lazer, Austin Maddux, Andrew Poe, Anna Watts, and Qinxuan Zhang, will be on hand from 4-6 p.m. on April 19 to welcome guests to the Kohl Gallery and to talk about their work. The public is welcome.

Breadth is often considered a range or area of knowledge or ability held by a person, but it may also be varied qualities spread between different individuals. This is certainly true for the diversity of gestures and objects made in this exhibition.The title for this exhibition was left unfinished as a gesture of inclusion toward viewers who are considered active participants, extending new meanings and interpretations of what each person has presented.

For more information, please contact Renee van der Stelt, interim director, Kohl Gallery, at rvanderstelt2@washcoll.edu.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

MOMA Curator Darby English to Present a Lecture April 18

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Darby English, professor of art history at the University of Chicago and adjunct curator of painting and sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, will present a lecture entitled “Differing, Drawn,” on the “Skin Set” drawings of contemporary African-American artist William Pope.L on April 18.

The lecture in Norman James Theatre, Smith Hall, begins at 4:30 p.m., is free and open to the public, and will be followed by a reception. “Differing, Drawn,” is sponsored by the Department of Art + Art History, together with the Starr Center, Black Studies Department, the Office of the Provost, and the William James Forum.

English, one of the most important scholars of African-American art working today,will speak on Pope.L, who is highly regarded as a performance artist, especially for his public interventionist pieces which explore racial dynamics in contemporary culture. Pope.L’s “Skin Set” drawings examine the absurdities of racialized language in American society with biting humor and barely concealed skepticism.

English is the Carl Darling Buck Professor of Art History and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of 1971: A Year in the Life of Color (University of Chicago Press, 2016), and How to See a Work of Art in Total Darkness (MIT Press, 2007), which has become a touchstone for discussions of African-American contemporary art. He is also the co-editor of Art History and Emergency (Yale UP, 2016) and Kara Walker: Narratives of a Negress(MIT Press, 2002 and Rizzoli, 2007). His new book, To Describe a Life: Essays at the Intersection of Art and Race Terror will be published by Yale University Press in 2018.

As a consulting curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, English assists in that museum’s efforts to strengthen its holdings in African-American Art. A gifted and popular lecturer, English in 2010 received the University of Chicago’s Quantrell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, the nation’s oldest such prize.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Introducing Chesapeake College’s Sixth President Cliff Coppersmith

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While Cliff Coppersmith has yet to move into his office in Wye Mills to begin his tenure as the sixth president of Chesapeake College, that didn’t stop the Spy from finding time with him for a quick chat on campus yesterday.

Dr. Coppersmith, who will officially assume his role in May, was in town briefly to meet with his future colleagues and pin down the logistics of moving from Montana, where he is currently serving as the dean and CEO of City College, the community college branch of Montana State University.

Coppersmith comes from a particularly unique background in community college teaching and administration, starting when he, himself, graduated as a young man from a community college in upper-state New York. Over the course of his career, he has spent nineteen years with the Pennsylvania College of Technology, a special mission affiliate of The Pennsylvania State University; and Utah State University – Eastern, formerly the College of Eastern Utah.

The Spy caught up with Dr. Coppersmith at Chesapeake College’s new Health Professions and Athletics Center to talk about his experiences in higher education, some of his priorities for Chesapeake College, and his excitement in returning to the East Coast to take on the vital task leading the Mid-Shore’s community college into a new decade of service.

This video is approximately five minutes in length. For more information about Chesapeake College, please go here

Kent County Teacher Awarded Educator of the Year

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The National Association of Private Special Education Centers (NAPSEC) recently announced Benedictine teacher Lorraine Slama as the recipient of this year’s Educator of the Year award.

As a national association, NAPSEC includes schools from across the country, all serving students and/or adults with special needs. This is the first time a Benedictine teacher has won this award.

Recognizing excellence and innovation in meeting the needs of children with special needs, the selection of the Educator of the Year award includes teachers and supervisors of a NAPSEC member program.

Slama has worked as a special educator at Benedictine for nearly 30 years, honing her skills as an educator through a life-long learning approach.  She is best known for sharing her varied talents and enthusiasm with students. Those talents range from juggling to photography and preforming arts; which she has developed into recreational programs at the school. She has also developed relaxation programs using Tai Chi and planned individualized sensory programs.She gives students real-world learning and work opportunities with the student and staff operated Healthy Way Café.

“She goes beyond her day to day lesson planning, “said Benedictine Education Director Julie Hickey. “While that’s not unusual at Benedictine – Lorraine has done it for 30 years, and done it successfully. She has benefited hundreds of students in and out of the classroom.”

Outside of the classroom, Slama organizes Benedictine Spirit Week activities, leads holiday parades and coordinates talent shows and is always a mentor to others.

“She has inspired countless coworkers leading so many to advance their careers in the world of special education,” said Hickey.” Her passion is contagious and her energy is never-ending.”

The award was presented to Lorraine Slama at the NAPSEC annual Leadership Conference held in San Antonio, where the Benedictine School also earned Accreditation from The National Commission for the Accreditation of Special Education Services (NCASES).

Providing opportunities to live meaningful, productive lives in communities of choice, Benedictine helps children and adults with developmental disabilities reach their greatest potential without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, or age.

Washington College Partners with Wake Forest University

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Adding another strategic collaboration to its growing list of post-graduate opportunities for students, Washington College is partnering with Wake Forest University’s School of Business for students who want to pursue a master’s degree in management. The agreement will streamline the application process for WC students and will provide scholarships based on their undergraduate efforts.

“This is a terrific opportunity for Washington College students who are not business management majors but are looking at a career in management,” says Patrice DiQuinzio, Provost and Dean. “Wake Forest is seeking students with a strong liberal arts background for this program, so it’s a natural fit for us.”

The Economist in 2017 ranked Wake Forest’s program fourth in the country, with 99 percent of its graduates landing jobs within six months of graduation. The ten-month program offers students a fast-paced introduction to business concepts related to finance, marketing, operations, business analytics, accounting, economics, organization behavior, ethics, career management, and information technology. The program also stresses teamwork skills with two “action learning projects.”

Business management majors are not eligible for this program, but WC students with a minor in business management may apply. Under the agreement, Wake Forest will waive the application fee and essay, and WC students with a GPA of 3.3 to 3.99 can receive a $5,000 scholarship, 3.4 to 3.599, $10,000, and those with GPAs of 3.6 or higher can receive $15,000. Wake Forest may also boost the scholarships based on a student’s demonstrated leadership ability, internships, extra-curricular activities, and other examples of potential academic and professional success.

“We are thrilled to work with our colleagues at Washington College, and to welcome their talented and purpose-driven students to our program,” says John White, Executive Director of Enrollment Management at the School of Business. “The Master’s in Management experience values the kind of leadership, courage, and social engagement Washington College students embody.”

The partnership was developed by Charlie Kehm, Chair and Professor of Physics, who worked closely John Montana, Senior Associate Director, MA Enrollment Management at Wake Forest. It joins other post-graduate partnerships between Washington College and other institutions. In January, the College announced a strategic partnership with Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., for WC graduates who want to pursue master’s programs offered through GU’s Biomedical Graduate Education. A partnership with the College of William & Mary’s School of Business enables WC students to earn a master of arts in accounting with the potential for a $10,000 scholarship, while a partnership with Loyola University offers fast-track admission after the undergraduate junior year to its Emerging Leaders MBA and masters in accounting programs.

Last fall, the College announced a new dual-degree program for environmental science and studies students at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment. Other dual-degree or 3:2 programs include including one in engineering with Columbia University’s Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, and programs in nursing and pharmacy with the University of Maryland School of Nursing and School of Pharmacy.

For more information about Wake Forest University’s School of Business Management program, see http://business.wfu.edu/masters-in-management/.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Washington College is Maryland’s First Bee Campus USA

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Washington College has become the first higher-education institution in Maryland and the 35th in the nation to be designated an affiliate of Bee Campus USA, a program designed to marshal the strengths of educational campuses for the benefit of pollinators.

“Imperiled pollinators are responsible for the reproduction of ninety percent of the world’s wild plant and tree species. Washington College is a stellar example of the influence educational institutions can have on their students and the broader community,” said Bee Campus USA Director Phyllis Stiles upon announcing WC’s affiliation. “Their talented faculty, staff, and students offer an invaluable resource for Eastern Shore residents in seeking ways to manage ornamental landscapes in more wildlife-friendly ways.”

Students celebrate the first honey harvest at the campus garden from the campus apiary’s bees.

“By studying and supporting pollinators, students are working to realign our culture with natural forces and enhance life on this planet,” said campus garden adviser Shane Brill ’03 M’11, who three years ago helped students install an apiary in the campus garden. “They can trace the path of a bee’s flight back to the energy of the sun and, in the course of that journey, reimagine our place in the world.”

Through a Beekeeping 101 course hosted each spring by the Department of Environmental Science and Studies, students examine bee anatomy, nutrition and colony behavior, and how to establish a hive. They become empowered in the role of “bee ambassadors” for the public, and they volunteer their apicultural skills in the community with the Upper Eastern Shore Beekeeping Association.

In the campus garden, students are hands-on learning not only the mechanics of beekeeping, but also the interconnected relationships between the campus bees and the plants and flowers that sustain them–and which they also sustain—in and near the garden. Last fall, for the first time, students harvested their own honey, collecting about two gallons. And, they’ve participated in pollinator workshops with local community members to further educate people about the vital roles that pollinators play in agriculture, permaculture, and plant and human health.

Beyond maintaining the campus apiary, students involved in the campus garden program implement conservation landscapes that ensure thriving populations of pollinators in a local, resilient food system. They share their research on the college website with a growing inventory of useful plants they cultivate on campus.

In its designation as a Bee Campus, Washington College has committed to minimizing hazards to pollinators by using no neonicotinoid pesticides, and almost no glyphosate herbicide or other potentially dangerous synthetic pesticides. According to Stiles, each certified campus must reapply each year and report on accomplishments from the previous year.

For more information about Washington College’s campus garden and for videos about beekeeping and honey harvest, visit https://www.washcoll.edu/about/campus/campus-garden/.

About Bee Campus USA and Bee City USA

The Bee Campus USA designation recognizes educational campuses that commit to a set of practices that support pollinators, including bees, butterflies, birds, and bats, among thousands of other species. For more information about the application process for becoming a Bee Campus USA affiliate, visit http://www.beecityusa.org/application-campus.html.

Bee City USA® urges local governments, individuals, organizations, corporations, and communities to promote and establish pollinator–friendly landscapes that are free of pesticides.  Since its inception in Asheville, North Carolina in 2012, many cities have been certified across the nation and many others are in the process of preparing applications. For more information about the application process for becoming a Bee City USA community, visit http://www.beecityusa.org/application-city.html.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.