Judy Crow New Maryland Wineries President

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Judy Crow

The Maryland Wineries Association announced May 1 that Judy Crow, owner and operator of Crow Vineyards, is the new President of the Board of Directors. Crow will preside over all Maryland Wineries Association meetings, assist with membership initiatives and guide major policy discussions at this critical time of industry growth.

“Judy has been an industry leader since the winery’s inception and we look forward to her dedication in the role of president of the association,” said Kevin Atticks, Executive Director of the Maryland Wineries Association.

Crow was raised on a dairy farm and spent almost thirty years teaching college and creating early childhood programs in Maryland and Delaware before she met Roy Crow, her husband. In 2008, Judy and Roy married and began the transformation of Crow Farm, a third generation family farm located in Kennedyville on the Eastern Shore. Together Roy and Judy focused on diversifying the farm from the traditional farm of corn and soy beans to include a farmstay B&B, a vineyard, and a winery along with an impressive herd of grass fed Angus cattle. Committed to creating the best products in the region, Judy, her son Brandon, and Roy continue to be very hands-on with the management of winemaking, the tasting room and wholesale distribution.

“In the short time I have been in the wine business, I have seen growth in the Maryland industry and believe that, with a strong winery association, the opportunities are endless. I believe that Maryland’s diverse wine growing regions allow consumers and tourist alike to experience a full portfolio of interesting wines,” said Judy Crow.

Maryland Wineries Association, a non-profit, member based, trade association, represents more than 80 wineries across the state. MWA’s mission is to cultivate a sustainable wine-growing community by expanding agricultural products and by increasing awareness through special events, industry education, advocacy, promotions and tourism. MWA is represented by the management group, Grow & Fortify. For more information, please visit the MWA website

Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate Earns the Premier Office Bronze Award

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The Chestertown Real Estate Varsity Team

This year, the prestigious 2016 Premier Office Bronze Award goes to the Chestertown Office of Coldwell Banker Chesapeake Real Estate. This is the second year this office has received this distinguished award. The Bronze level Coldwell Banker® Premier Office is the highest honor Coldwell Banker offices can earn.  The Chestertown office is located at 114 B Cross Street, Chestertown, MD.  It can be reached at 410-778–0330.  Chesapeake Real Estate has been an affiliate of the Coldwell Banker® system for 7 years.

 

J.R.’s Expanding to Smyrna

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The Lemon Leaf and J.R.’s Past Time Pup will soon be entertaining customers in Smyrna, Del. J.R. Alfree, who owns and operates the popular Chestertown restaurant and bar will be expanding his operation to the Inn at Duck Creek in Smyrna, according to a story in Delaware Online today.

CBMM’s Draketail Project Wrapping Up, Summer Splash Anticipated

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Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum Boatyard Program Manager Jenn Kuhn reports work continues in CBMM’s boatshop on the construction of the 25’ draketail Pintail. Construction began mid-January 2016 through CBMM’s Apprentice for a Day public boatbuilding program, with an early summer splash now anticipated.

Participants in the CBMM’s Apprentice for a Day recently set the two-cylinder Yanmar diesel engine in Pintail.

Pintail’s white oak duck walk, sapele coaming, sassafras oiled floorboards, marine plywood battery box, and mahogany seats have been constructed and installed by AFAD and Family Boatshop participants. Her two-cylinder Yanmar diesel engine has been set in place, awaiting the construction of the engine box, electronics panel, steering gear, and systems hook up. She has multiple coats of Z-spar Captains varnish on the rails and Marshalls Cove white semi-gloss oil based paint on the top sides and decks.

Pintail is available for purchase, with proceeds supporting the education, restoration, and exhibition programs of the non-profit museum. For more information about programs and the purchase of Pintail, contact Jenn Kuhn at 410-745-4980 or jkuhn@cbmm.org. See more photos of the project at bit.ly/CBMMPintail.

Chesapeake Bank and Trust Announces New Branch Manager

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Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company is pleased to announce its new Branch Manager, Karyn Dustin, who is replacing retiring Manager Mary Clark.

Karyn Dustin brings fourteen years of retail banking experience to Chesapeake Bank and Trust. Most recently Karyn was a Branch Manager in Easton, MD. Prior to that she was a Branch Administration Manager in Chestertown. Along with an impressive background in banking, Karyn has proven herself to be of the highest caliber when it comes to providing customer service.

“Karen is an experienced community banker who is glad to be back in Chestertown as part of our team.” – Glenn L. Wilson, President & CEO

A graduate of Boston University, Dustin lives in Centreville with her husband Steve. Dustin has also successfully graduated from the Maryland School of Banking which is a highly impressive achievement.

Founded in 1986, Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company, Chestertown’s Truly Local Banking Experience, has roots in Kent County dating back more than 100 years. Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company is a well-known pillar in the community, helping residents and businesses with their banking and investments needs. For more information please visit www.chesapeaketrust.com or call (410) 778-1600.

The 22nd Spring Career & Job Expo April 11

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Save the Date for the 22nd Spring Career & Job Expo on April 11, 2017, 2 – 5 p.m., at Chesapeake College, HPAC.

It has been 22 years since we began coordinating the largest job match opportunity for job seekers and employers in the Upper Shore region!  We are again celebrating the best prospect for facilitating this event for meeting one another with our upcoming, five-county 22nd Annual Spring Career & Job Expo!  This free event represents the best place to meet the most employers in one single afternoon in our five-county area – employers who are interested in what you can do!  Competition will be fierce again this year as more and more job seekers flood the employment market.  You will need to articulate your skills, knowledge, talents, experience and abilities with your best effort for this local area network of employers who are all in recruitment and hiring mode!

This is your homework assignment:  prepare yourself to meet with employers by practicing with one of our local American Job Center staff to update your resume, practice your introduction and research the businesses in our area.  Dress for success and bring several copies of your resume with you.  Keep an eye out for the list of employers who are coming so you can look them up and understand their product and the jobs for which they recruit – everyone has a website!  Have you applied on-line recently for any jobs?  The local American Job Center can help you!  Do you have a short script ready to talk about your skills and experience?  Practice!  What about job applications?  How about that handshake?  Eye contact?  You’re going to shine!

Practice makes perfect – come to the American Job Center and let us assist you.  Follow us on facebook to get the most current job listings in our area.

Looking for work is a hard job…let us help! www.uswib.org

Sponsored by Chesapeake College, the Upper Shore WIOA & American Job Center Network, including Adult Ed, DORS, DWDAL & DSS Organizations

WC Lecture Re-Examines Famous Indian Captivity Narrative from the 17th Century

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One of the most famous, the most studied, the most reprinted, and the most anthologized of all early American texts is Mary Rowlandson’s story. Her narrative is the earliest surviving account of Indian captivity written by a European colonist in the British Colonies of North America.

DeProspoRichard De Prospo, professor of English and American Studies at Washington College, questions whether this well-known account is really a narrative at all. Indeed, have we been overselling Mary Rowlandson’s seventeenth-century account of Indian captivity to our 21st-century undergraduates?

De Prospo’s presentation,sponsored by the C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, starts at 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 21 in the Sophie Kerr Room, Miller Library, Washington College. The event is free and open to the public and will be followed by a light reception.

A highly successful author, De Prospo’s books include The Latest Early American Literature (2015), The Stowe DebateRhetorical Strategies in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, with Mason Lowance and Ellen Westbrook (1994), and Theism in the Discourse of Jonathan Edwards (1985). He has published numerous articles that can be found on his Washington College profile. De Prospo began teaching at Washington College in 1975; he has also been visiting professor of literary theory at the University of New Hampshire and of early American literature at the University of London.

Chesapeake Bank and Trust Hires New Lender

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Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company has announced its newest Lender, Justin Varga to the bank.

Screen Shot 2017-03-07 at 10.39.01 AM“Given our success in helping clients and growing market share, we’re glad to add a great local guy like Justin to our team,” said Glenn L. Wilson, President & CEO.

Justin Varga brings nine years of professional financial experience from J.P. Morgan Chase Private Bank to us. Beginning as an account officer, Justin progressed assuming roles as Portfolio Manager, before becoming a Senior Account Officer in 2013.

A graduate of University of Delaware, with a B.S. in Finance, Varga is a Kent County resident residing in Galena, MD. With a true passion for helping the community, Varga’s experience with relationship management and financial strategy, will further complement Chesapeake Bank and Trust’s exceptional lending department.

“Justin’s relationship banking experience will help us assist those in our community who have borrowing needs, particularly those in northern Kent County and Southern Cecil County'” said Rob Thompson, Senior Lender at the Bank.

Founded in 1986, Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company, Chestertown’s Truly Local Banking Experience, has roots in Kent County dating back more than 100 years. Chesapeake Bank and Trust Company is a well-known pillar in the community, helping residents and businesses with their banking and investments needs. For more information please visit www.chesapeaketrust.com or call (410) 778-1600.

Annapolis: Maryland Annual Corporate Filing Fee would be Raised Based on Company Assets

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Maryland businesses have come out strongly against a proposed change in the annual corporate filing fee that would go from a flat fee structure to a progressive tax based on a company’s assets.

The annual corporate filing fee is currently a flat fee of $300 in order to maintain the legal entity’s existence in the state; the progressive tax could climb as high as $4,000 based on a company’s fixed assets.

Sponsors of the bill say they’ve received massive support from constituents with small businesses.

“This bill is about fairness,” said the bill’s sponsor, Del. Vanessa Atterbeary, D-Howard County. “And it attempts to put businesses on a graduated scale based on their taxable assets.”

Fees would drop for 250,000 firms

Under the measure, HB691, 233,000 entities in Maryland would see the annual fee drop to $150 and another 19,000 would see a decrease to $200.  Around 11,000 businesses would continue to pay $300, according to the fiscal note.

In 2003, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich raised the fee from $100 to $300.

“Essentially what we would like to do is not make Ben Kramer Save the Puppies LLC to have to pay the same amount as Under Armour,” Atterbeary said, using the name of a committee member.

But once fixed assets pass $50,000, the fee more than doubles to $750 and climbs north to $4,000 for companies with fixed assets above $200,000.

“Why should any small business pay the same exact $300 fee…as a Northrop Grumman,” said one of the bill’s cosponsors, Del. Dan Morhaim, D-Baltimore County, in testimony before the House Economic Matters Committee on Wednesday. He said he had received many complaints in recent years about the regressive nature of the tax.

“This does represent a tax break for entities we often say we want to support,” he said.

Del. Chris Adams, R-Dorchester, said the fee under the bill appears to be more of a tax increase than a fee increase.

“We’re getting away from the idea that there’s a fee that we pay for the privilege of doing business in the state of Maryland and moving [it towards a tax], Adams said. He challenged Morhaim’s testimony referring to the fee as a “tax.” Morhaim quickly apologized for the characterization.

Adams said many CPAs in his district complained more about the proposal than the current sick leave bill moving through legislature.

“I got more phone calls on this bill than I did the sick pay bill,” he said. “I got a lot of opposition from the business community on this one.”

Champe McCulloch of Maryland Associated General Contractors said the progressive tax would punish businesses that investment in Maryland.

“Do you as the General Assembly want to hold business that make substantial capital investments in Maryland in disdain and [assess] a higher fee because they are committed to Maryland and committed to investing in Maryland,” McCulloch asked the committee.

Assets don’t correlate with income

Many who testified against the bill said using fixed assets could raise the fee for companies with higher fixed assets, like trucks and tools, than a small firm with very little fixed assets that makes considerably more from services, like a law firm.

Mike O’Halloran, Maryland director of the National Federation of Independent Business, told the committee that the small businesses the bill aims to help can easily have more than $50,000 in fixed assets.

“You can get up to $50,000 in taxable assets fairly quickly,” O’Halloran said. He said a caterer he knew would see an increase simply because the kitchen equipment easily exceeds $50,000 in value.

Atterbeary said the proposal was revenue neutral.

The initial expenditures to administer the new fee structure comes to $500,000 in fiscal 2018 and $66,000 annually. Revenues are expected to increase by $435,000 annually.

But Maryland Chamber of Commerce in written testimony said the bill was an attempt at a revenue increase.

“The State’s Department of Assessments and Taxation has imposed filing fees to offset the administrative cost to the State of updating corporate documents each year,” the Chamber said.  “To replace the traditional fee with a scaled fee is a veiled attempt to increase State revenue at the expense of small businesses.”

By Dan Menefee