Illustrated Lecture: “Beyond Stereotypes: War, Warriors, and the Creative Arts”

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WarFront/HomeFront with new Kent Arts Building in background

The public is invited to an Illustrated Lecture this coming Sunday, November 19, 2017 at 2 p.m. at the Kent County Arts Council Gallery, 101 Spring Avenue, Chestertown, Maryland.

“Beyond Stereotypes: War, Warriors, and the Creative Arts” will be presented by Tara Tappert, Founder and Principal of The Arts & The Military; and, Michael D. Fay, Retired Combat Artist and Founder of The Joe Bonham Project.  Both work with wounded veterans to help foster healing through artistic expression.  The works displayed show war through the eyes of those who lived it – and are still living with war’s impact.

Main Art Gallery in new Kent Arts Building

Tara Tappert, Art Consultant and founder of ThemArts and the Military

Tara Tappert, Founder & Director, The Arts & The Military (www.artsandmilitary.org) is an Award-winning scholar, researcher, writer, curator, collections manager, archivist/librarian, editor, graduate-level teacher, academic adviser, and tutor for cultural, educational, and business institutions, and for private individuals and families. Her scholarship is focused in 20th c. American craft – particularly as a rehabilitation tool for war trauma and in late 19th and early 20th c. American art and culture– particularly portraiture, biography, women and art, family history, and genealogy. She is also a noted scholar of the portraitist Cecilia Beaux.

Michael D. Fay, artist and founder of WarFront/HomeFront & Joe Bonham Project

Michael D. Fay, Founder, The Joe Bonham Project, first served in the Marines from 1975 to 1978 as an infantry man attaining the rank of sergeant. He left the service to pursue a college degree and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Art Education from the Pennsylvania State University in 1982. He then re-enlisted in the Marines in December 1983 and served on active duty until September 1993. During this ten-year period he served in the Presidential Helicopter Squadron under President Ronald Reagan, and participated in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Eastern Exit, and Provide Promise campaigns. Seven years later, he enlisted  into the Marine Corps Reserve in January 2000 in order to fill the billet of combat artist with the Field History Department supporting the Historical Division of the Marine Corps.

As an official Marine Corps combat artist, Fay has been mobilized for four extended periods, and has served two tours each in Afghanistan and Iraq. Fay’s paintings and drawings made during these deployments demonstrate how combat looks and feels in a very personal and immediate way. The focus of these works is the human face of war. In images of ordinary people conducting routine business in difficult and unfamiliar circumstances, he reminds us of individual sacrifice and heroism.

Drawings of soldiers in the WarFront/HomeFront Exhibit currently at the Kent County Arts Council Arts Building through Dec. 3.

 

 

 

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RiverArts Holiday Show and Sale Opens Friday

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Glass Ornaments

RiverArts artists – and possibly their elves – have been busy creating hand-crafted gifts for men, women, children, pets and the home for the annual Holiday Show and Sale which opens Friday, Nov. 17.  There are gifts for every pocketbook – from stocking stuffers to the perfect present for that special someone.

Ready to decorate? We have gorgeous holiday wreaths and ornaments galore: glass, origami, origami, painted oyster and crab shells. Looking for a hostess gift?  Ice cream scoops to ceramic teapots and espresso cups, practical to whimsical, you will find it here.

Don’t forget the cards! We have them for every occasion, boxed as well as individual. And don’t overlook the decorative gift tags.

Paintings include miniatures and small works, some of which are displayed on tiny easels.  There are collages, and photography;  subject matter ranges from landscapes and nautical scenes to still lives and abstracts.

Jewelry lovers, plan on spending time as there are so many possibilities:  necklaces and earrings that are made of precious and semi-precious stones, silver and copper, and origami, as well as fun fiber jewelry.

There are gorgeous knitted, woven, and hand-dyed silk scarves, knitted sweaters, gloves, and caps for men, women and children.

Other types of art include furniture, decorative wood art and many ceramic pieces from the RiverArts Clay Studio artists; cups, platters, bowls,  hand-built and wheel thrown, with decorative designs and glazes.

Gallery hours are Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday.  First Friday open until 8 p.m. The show will run through the end of December.  For more information visit  the RiverArts website or call 410-778-6300.

RiverArts is located at 315 High Street, Suite 106, in the breezeway.

Young Artists Shine at KidSPOT!

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Kaela Covey, grade 4, mask; Sukie Tilghman, grade 3, owl; Saraia Wilmoree, grade 3, doll; Elizabeth Healy, instructor; Alden Swanson,grade 4, owl

KidSPOT! is an after-school art program for, well, kids. Sponsored by RiverArts,  KidSpot has year-round activities including drop-in sessions.  This Friday will be the last day of  a special six-week KidSPOT! session in coordination with the Kent County Public Schools for students grades K-8 .  The younger kids made masks, dolls, cut-paper art and more. The middle school students did drawings in various media. And their KidSPOT! exhibit was up on the walls at RiverArts by First Friday.  And you can see it, too!

The People’s Choice award for the middle school went to Emma Porter, grade 8 for her big cat.

RiverArts will run another six-week after-school program starting in the new year.  Contact RiverArts for information.  The program runs from 3:30 to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday.

Gabriel Nailor, grade 5, Super Dog; Sei-Aun Thompson, grade 3, doll; August Swanson, K, cut-paper art; Kato Swanson, grade 2, cut-paper art

Joy Maine was curator and instructor for the Middle School exhibit.  She has taught art in the Kent County Middle School in Chestertown for over 30 years.  Elizabeth Healy was curator and instructor for the elementary school students. She taught elementary school in Montana for 25 years before moving to Chestertown in 2014.  She is currently the co-chair of KidSPOT.

The RiverArts Gallery at 315 High Street, Suite 106 (behind Dunkin’ Donuts)is open Tuesday through Friday, 11 am to 4 pm, Saturday 10 to 4, and Sunday 11 to 3 pm.  Don’t miss it!

The KidSPOT! exhibit is in the second and third rooms at RiverArts.  The main room has another exhibit that is also worth taking a look at. The Spy article on the Chester River School of Art Student Exhibit is here.

Photo Gallery below by Peter Heck and Jane Jewell

Masks and dolls by artists ages 5-10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monster by Grant Barry, grade 6

Lexi Sullivan, grade 8

Trista Strong, grade 8

Caleb Schultz, grade 8

Chloie Massey, grade 8

Sebastian Aquilar, grade 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Chesapeake Show at Chesapeake College

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In the months of November and December, a talented group of artists from the Eastern Shore and Annapolis will present their original artwork at “The Chesapeake Show” in Chesapeake College’s Todd Performing Arts Center in Wye Mills, MD.

“The Chesapeake Show: A Traveling Exhibition of Select Artists” features fourteen local artists who express their love of our Chesapeake Bay region through their beautiful and diverse art. This group has exhibited throughout the Eastern Shore and Annapolis region, featuring original artwork from watercolors and acrylics to cut-paper and ribbon collages. Organized by Dave Murphy and Steve Bleinberger, other artists include Peggy Blades, Mary Bickford, Katherine Carney, Carolyn Councell, Ann Farley, Brenda Larson, Judi MacDonald, Nancy O’Brien, Paul Taylor, Carol Vaughn, Sean Wells, and Wende Woodham.

Come see scenes of our beautiful waterways, boats, marine animals, and more as you reminisce about times on and near the water. The Chesapeake Show is open for viewing during the hours of 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday — and can also be seen during special events in the Todd Performing Arts Center during these months.

During these same months, many of these artists will also have giclees of their work exhibited at the Annapolis Maritime Museum. A giclee is a high-quality reproduction of an artist’s original piece of artwork, making artists’ work available in an additional way that can be more affordable. The artwork is available to purchase onsite from the Museum, and will make wonderful & meaningful holiday gifts. The Annapolis Maritime Museum is open from 11 am to 3 pm Wednesday through Sunday, and they are located at 723 Second Street in the Eastport neighborhood of Annapolis.

“Analog Video Works” by Timothy Nohe Opens at Kohl Gallery Nov. 9

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“Cosmonaut” by Timothy Nohe

 

Kohl Gallery at Washington College is pleased to announce a one-person show featuring Baltimore-based artist, composer, and educator Timothy Nohe. Opening on November 9 with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m., and running through December 15, the exhibition “Voltage is Signal: Analog Video Works by Timothy Nohe” will feature works exploring analog video technology in various innovative ways.

Nohe will be in residence for the production of LightForest by the Baltimore Dance Project in Decker Theatre on November 17 and 18, a dance for which he composed the score. He will deliver a gallery talk on November 16 at 4:30 p.m. while on campus for the production.

Nohe’s work engages traditional and electronic media in civic life and public places. His practice has been focused upon sustainability and place, and musical and video works for dance and live performance. His show at Kohl in many ways marks a new direction as he departs from a typically more image-based practice to consider the ways that voltages might produce abstractions. The resulting works are resonant of past traditions, from color field to Pop, even as they emerge from an interrogation of various media.

Nohe is the founding director of the Center for Innovation, Creativity and Research in the Arts (CIRCA) and a professor of visual arts at UMBC. He was an artist in residence at the Centre for Creative Arts at La Trobe University from 2011–2014, and an adjunct professor in the faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (2011–2015). He also serves on the editorial board of the international journal, Unlikely, which is based in Melbourne, Australia.

The recipient of a Fulbright Senior Scholar Award from the Australian-American Fulbright Commission in 2006, Nohe went on to receive the Commission’s 2011 Fulbright Alumni Initiative Grant, which resulted in multiple exhibitions in the United States and Australia on view from 2012-2016. Nohe has also received multiple other awards and honors including five Maryland State Arts Council Awards, a Creative Baltimore Award, a 2011 National Endowment for the Arts and William G. Baker Fund “Our Town Project-Creative Placemaking” grant, and a 2015 Warnock Foundation grant. Nohe has exhibited and performed his work in a range of national and international venues and was commissioned as an exhibiting artist for Light City 2017, Baltimore. His contribution, Electron Drawing, will be on display in the gallery.

Kohl Gallery is located on the first floor of the Gibson Center for the Arts at Washington College. It is open Monday through Wednesday1 to 6 p.m.Saturday and Sunday11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please email: kohl_gallery@washcoll.edu.

“Electron” by Timothy Nohe

 

Paintings and Drawings by William Willis at Adkins Arboretum

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A powerful and mysterious energy runs through William Willis’s work. In Presence and Place, his show of paintings and drawings on view through Dec. 1 at the Adkins Arboretum Visitor’s Center, his compelling, semi-abstracted trees and water, snakes and flying birds pulse with a vitality that is barely held in check. There will be a reception to meet the artist on Sat., Oct. 21 from 3 to 5 p.m.

Being out in nature is key to Willis’s art. At least once a week, he bicycles with his son and other members of the Talbot Mountain Bike group on the trails in Tuckahoe State Park. Many of the paintings in this show grew from encounters with the park’s trees and waterways, and a strong feeling that they are living entities permeates the show.

Anyone familiar with the way Tuckahoe Creek swells in a rainstorm and floods into the forest will recognize the trees rising from swirling water in “After the Rain.” As water streams around their trunks, gray paint marked with white scratches identifies a beech, while peculiar cream-colored spots on a bluish trunk denote one of the forest’s many sycamores.

“After the Rain” by William Willis

Willis’s need to be out in nature came early. Growing up in Florida, he often visited the woods near his home and began developing his keen sense of observation. Although he taught for two decades at the Corcoran School of Art and several other colleges and universities and has exhibited in numerous solo museum and gallery shows, he has continued to spend time hiking, bicycling and camping since settling in the Eastern Shore town of Preston in 1980.

Willis is keenly interested in how a sense of living presence can be picked up by honing one’s awareness. He has long been interested in Hindu and Buddhist philosophies that emphasize developing awareness, but he also traces this back to earlier times when it was essential for humans to use all their senses in order to survive.

Noting how a hunter will sit still for hours on end, not focusing on anything specific but being aware of everything around him, Willis said, “There’s a kind of side vision, a kind of indirect approach where your vision starts to open up to everything. There’s an obvious theory that meditation came from that kind of silent watching and sitting still. As they say, when you do that, the world comes to you—you don’t have to go to the world.”

Whenever he paints or draws, Willis goes through a deeply intuitive process of search and discovery. It’s obvious that the finished image doesn’t come easily. The trees, logs and meandering vines he paints are almost cartoonishly simple, but they are scarred and worn. Often, seemingly unrelated images partially show through from underneath. It’s as if he is thinking on the canvas, painting, then scraping parts of the image away, then painting some more. He may even cut up a canvas and collage part of it into another artwork. It’s a process of intense interaction, paring it down and building it up again in new ways until it hums with energy.

Certain motifs frequently recur in Willis’s work. There are pine trees with sweeping zigzag branches, sinuous lines that evoke snakes or twisting vines, and concentric rings of water borrowed from traditional Japanese screen paintings. Each of these contributes to the multilayered themes that give his work its astonishing richness. One favorite image is a flying goose.

“That image happened when I moved out here from the D.C. area and I was into lots of Hindu mythology,” he explained. “My friends teased me, ‘So you’re doing waterfowl paintings now.’ Hamsa is a Hindu mantra, but it’s also the goose. The whole thing is about how the goose can dive down out of the darkness and live on the surface of the water. At the same time, it can fly away to freedom.”

This show is part of Adkins Arboretum’s ongoing exhibition series of work on natural themes by regional artists. It is on view through Dec. 1 at the Arboretum Visitor’s Center located at 12610 Eveland Rd. near Tuckahoe State Park in Ridgely. Contact the Arboretum at 410–634–2847, ext. 0 or info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

First Friday: RiverArts Reception and Exhibit

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Opening Reception: First Friday, October 6, 5 – 8 pm.  Join us for refreshments and the new Artists Exhibit for October. Be sure to vote for your favorite in the People’s Choice award. The exhibit will be on view through October 29.

Join the HP Festival fun with RiverArts!

This is your chance to

learn how to mix magic spells and potions to take home! 

Friday 5pm-7:30pm: Register here

Saturday 10am-4pm: Register here

 

 

 

At KidSpot – Friday5-7pm

 

Collage created by students at Kent County Schools with Aimee Boumeia

Concentric Circle Quilt by Kindergarten and 1st Grade classes

Triangle designs by 2nd and 3rd-grade classes

Wall Hanging by 4th and 5th-grade classes

Want to learn more about upcoming events, exhibits, classes?

Read all about it on our website.

Paintings by Kathryn O’Grady on View at Adkins Arboretum

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Artist Kathryn O’Grady will make you think differently about the flocks of blackbirds that are such a familiar sight in the Chesapeake region. In “Four and Twenty,” a series of blackbird “portraits” on view in Adkins Arboretum’s Visitor’s Center through Sept. 29, every bird is an individual with its own quirky personality.

In Close to the Big Pond, her show of oil paintings and watercolors augmented with crayon and metallic pigment, O’Grady zeros in on nature’s mind-boggling diversity and its irrepressible energy. There will be a reception on Sat., Aug. 12 from 3 to 5 p.m. to meet the artist and learn how she became so entranced with Maryland’s birds and rural landscapes.

O’Grady has always been in love with color.

“It’s a deep-seated obsession,” she admitted. “I remember when I found out that Crayolas came in more than eight colors when I was two or three, I felt like my mother had been holding out on me.”

“Panic, Mayhem and Ullabee” by Kathryn O’Grady

Exhibiting at the Arboretum courtesy of Baltimore’s Steven Scott Gallery, O’Grady earned her BFA from Michigan State University and an MFA from the University of Texas and has shown her work widely in the U.S. In 1997, she moved from Texas to the tiny, rural town of Tracys Landing, south of Annapolis, where she has been painting the landscapes and birds near her house ever since.

“When we first moved here from Texas, my first overwhelming impression was I’ve got to find more colors of green paint,” she said.

As it turned out, she began to discover the many colors that underlie the green of plants and make it so lively. Like an Impressionist artist, when she painted an old tobacco barn sagging under the weight of a complicated tangle of vines, she did it with thousands of tiny strokes of scarlet, maroon, yellow, lime, pine green and shadowy blue. A riot of color and activity, it brilliantly captures how plants reclaim any building or field left vacant.

“I like seeing the plants take over,” O’Grady explained. “In Texas, it’s so hot and dry, it takes a lot longer for the plant life to reclaim the structures. Here it happens as soon as you turn your back.”

O’Grady had already been keeping chickens and peacocks when her daughter rescued a lost mallard duckling eight years ago and brought it home. Less than a day old, the exhausted bird fell asleep in O’Grady’s hand. Rather than put it in the aviary with her other birds, she raised it in the house until it was old enough to move to a nearby pond. Not long afterward, the duck returned, bringing along a new mate that she presented to O’Grady. The pair soon nested and began an extended family that still lives near the artist’s home.

“It changed the way I look at all birds,” O’Grady said. “I learned from my ducks that birds are individuals.”

In several portraits she has painted of her ducks, there’s no doubt of this. Each bird has its own distinctive personality. To make it even better, some of the portraits are accompanied by the ducks’ own stories engagingly told by writer Peter Guttmacher.

Throughout her paintings, O’Grady has a knack for capturing the vivacious energy of birds and plants, amiably conveying her awe of the indomitable spirit and incredible complexity of the natural world.

This show is part of Adkins Arboretum’s ongoing exhibition series of work on natural themes by regional artists. It is on view through Sept. 29 at the Arboretum Visitor’s Center located at 12610 Eveland Road near Tuckahoe State Park in Ridgely. Contact the Arboretum at 410–634–2847, ext. 0 or info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

Adkins Arboretum is a 400-acre native garden and preserve at the headwaters of the Tuckahoe Creek in Caroline County. Open year round, the Arboretum is the region’s resource for native plants and education programs about nature, ecology and wildlife conservation gardening. For more information, visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

First Friday: See the Luminous Art of Steve Bleinberger at The Artists Gallery

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Port Tack” watercolor by Steve Bleinberger

On First Friday, August 4th, the Artists’ Gallery will present the work of Steve Bleinberger in “Water, Water, Everywhere,” with a reception to meet the artist that evening from 5-8 pm.   The show will hang in The Artists’ Gallery throughout the month of August.

Growing up as a teenager on the shores of Thomas Point, Maryland, Steve was surrounded by water and within the sight and sound of an active lighthouse.  It was there that he experienced firsthand, the waters of the Chesapeake in all forms- from capping waves to beautiful glassy calms and everything in between.  “Painting in the most wonderfully fluid of mediums – watercolor – I strive to capture the look and most importantly, the feel of an authentic Maryland treasure:  The Chesapeake Bay.”

“Bay’s Magic Light” watercolor by Steve Bleinberger

Steve Bleinberger holds a BFA degree with advanced art studies from Richmond’s Virginia Commonwealth University.  He is a member of local, regional and national art clubs, conducts watercolor workshops and demos, and judges creative competitions.  His work is exhibited throughout the mid-Atlantic region and has gained respect and admiration for depicting Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Chesapeake Bay waterscapes, Bay work boats and the dwindling ranks of those that man them.   Steve’s paintings can be found in private collections as well as the homes and offices of Chesapeake racing skippers, “Tall Ship” captains, Bay Pilots, tugboat owners, naval officers, a noted marine historian and a President of the United States.

First Friday, August 4, exhibit and reception for artist Steve Bleinberger from 5:00 – 8:00 pm. The Artists’ Gallery is located at 239 High Street in Chestertown and is open daily from 10-5, Tuesday through Saturday, and Sundays from 12:30-4:30.  For more information, please see the Artists Gallery website or call 410-778-2425.  

“Skipjacks” watercolor by Steve Bleinberger

“Dawn Patrol” watercolor by Steve Bleinberger

“Cap’n, We are Flyin’ Home!” watercolor by Steve Bleinberger

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