Photographs by Lynn Teo Simarski on View at Adkins Arboretum

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“Spikerush” by Lynn Teo Simarski

During the six years she lived aboard a boat on the Chesapeake and its tributaries, photographer and science writer Lynn Teo Simarski often slipped her kayak into the water to explore the delicate borders where water mingles with land. In her show Emergent: Visual Sips from the Waterline, on view through February 2 at the Adkins Arboretum Visitor’s Center, her digital photographs tell the stories of the remarkable plants she found in the region’s quiet coves and marshes. There will be a reception to meet the artist on Sat., Dec. 16 from 3 to 5 p.m.

Sliding along low in the water, the kayak gives Simarski a close-up, intimate view of every detail of the shoreline. In photographs that range from spare black-and-white images of slender marsh grasses and their dancing reflections to masses of lotus leaves floating in water rippled with brilliant autumn colors, she distills moments of beauty and playfulness that few people get to see. There are softly rising mists, dramatic slanting shadows and an occasional dragonfly perching weightlessly on a bit of grass.

Simarski, who lives in Alexandria, Va., when she and her husband aren’t aboard their 40-foot trawler, Bright Pleiades, said, “I kayak as much as I can. That’s really my favorite part about having lived on the boat.”

In a perfect image of the interconnections of earth, water and sky, sprightly blades of grass emerge from satiny reflections of the clouds above in “Skygrass.” Simarski’s fascination with emergents—plants that are rooted in the underwater soil but grow up into the air—continually draws her to the fragile edges of the water where these aquatic plants perform a vital role in the ecosystem by providing shelter, food and breeding places for countless creatures.

The majority of the show’s photographs come from the Chesapeake region, but Simarski shot a few of them in Maine, Wisconsin and South Carolina. Interestingly, except for some tassels of Spanish moss dangling from a leafy branch, it’s hard to tell the difference. There’s a certain universality in the elegant calligraphic gestures of blades of marsh grass and the ever-changing effects of light, mirrored skies, turning tides and shifting seasons.

With its perky bright green stalks tipped with gold, Spikerush” is a jaunty image. A type of sedge, it’s small and grows just barely above the water’s surface. Simarski found it with tiny concentric rings dimpling the water where its stalks meet their own reflections.

“This is one that was not from a kayak,” she explained. “It was spring, and I was going for a walk at the marina in Galesville, Md., where we keep our boat. I saw these patterns in a ditch, and I was just stunned. Here were these rushes only about three inches high. So, I ran back to the boat and drove back over so I could stand on the car and look down at the ditch to get the viewpoint I wanted.”

In addition to her photography, Simarski has written articles on the Bay for Chesapeake Bay Magazine and Bay Weekly. She and her husband, Guy G. Guthridge, are currently working on a book called Chesapeake Winter about their years living aboard their boat and their conversations with scientists, watermen and others about the Bay’s future. They are planning a trip to Florida along the Intracoastal Waterway.

For Simarski, the margins of water and land are endlessly compelling. Speaking of her love for these vulnerable, ever-changing perimeters, she said, “The boat enables me to go to these places you can’t get to by road and put the kayak in. The boat is our magic carpet.”

This show is part of Adkins Arboretum’s ongoing exhibition series of work on natural themes by regional artists. It is on view through Feb. 2 at the Arboretum Visitor’s Center located at 12610 Eveland Road near Tuckahoe State Park in Ridgely. Contact the Arboretum at 410–634–2847, ext. 0 or info@adkinsarboretum.org for gallery hours.

Cast Chosen for Church Hill Theatre Production of Biloxi Blues

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Director Michael Whitehill has announced the cast for Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues, the lead off production in Church Hill Theatre’s 2018 season. The Tony Award winning play is set at boot camp in Biloxi, Mississippi during World War II. Loosely autobiographical, the comedy pits the cruel and caustic Sgt. Toomey against the draftees, especially the sensitive Arnold Epstein. His friend Eugene Morris Jerome channels Simon’s own memories of military service as a fledgling author. This classic coming-of-age tale includes danger, sex, love, prejudice, bravery and some pretty salty army talk.

Fresh recruits on their bunks in Church Hill Theatre’s production of Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues. Clockwise from the top left: Robbie Spray, Jeff Rank, Troy Strootman, Morgan Jung, Timothy Daly, Anthony Daly.

Arnold Epstein will be played by Robbie Spray and Eugene Morris Jerome by Troy Strootman. Other draftees are Anthony Daly as Roy Selridge, Timothy Daly as Joseph Wykowski, Morgan Jung as Don Carney, and Jeff Rank as James Hennesey. John Haas takes the role of their nemesis, Sgt. Merwin J. Toomey. Kendall Irene Davis is the sweet Daisy Hannigan and Christine Kinlock is the not-so-sweet Rowena. Scarlett Chappell completes the cast, playing a USO dancer.

Whitehill, one of Church Hill Theatre’s most experienced directors, most recently directed the thought-provoking Doubt: A Parable.  His production team for Biloxi Blues includes Sylvia Maloney, Laura Crabtree, Steve Atkinson, Katie Sardo, Douglas Kaufmann and Brian Draper.

Biloxi Blues will open at Church Hill Theatre on January 19, 2018, and run through February 4, with weekend performances at 8 pm on Fridays and Saturdays and 2 pm on Sundays.  Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for members, and $10 for students, with special prices for groups of ten or more. CHT offers 2 for the price of 1 tickets on opening night, Friday, January 19, to those who reserve by phone. Reservations can be made by calling the box office at 410-556-6003 or online at www.churchhilltheatre.org

Gale Rasin Joins Maryland Humanities Board of Directors

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Gale Rasin

Maryland Humanities has added five new members, including Gale Rasin of Chestertown, to the organization’s Board of Directors. They join 22 additional volunteers in service on the Board, led by newly elected Chair Cynthia Raposo. Anyone interested in discussing board service may contact Executive Director Phoebe Stein at (410) 685-0095.

“We are delighted to welcome such accomplished individuals to our Board,” said Stein. “They bring a wealth of professional and personal experiences and a deep commitment to our mission to provide impactful and accessible lifelong learning experiences to communities throughout Maryland.”

Gale Rasin served as a judge on Baltimore City’s trial courts for more than twenty years until she retired in 2012 from the Circuit Court for Baltimore City. Rasin created a felony mental health docket in the Circuit Court that supervises criminal defendants who suffer from serious mental illness. She continues to preside over it as a senior judge. In 2013, Rasin was honored by the Metropolitan Baltimore Chapter of NAMI with its Opening Minds Award. She has served as an adjunct professor at the University of Baltimore Law School and has taught ethics in the Johns Hopkins University MBA program. (Kent County)

Douglas Greenberg is a Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus at Rutgers, where he also served as Executive Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences. Previously, he was Professor of History at the University of Southern California and Executive Director of the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education, which was founded by Steven Spielberg.  Earlier in his career, Greenberg was President and Director of the Chicago Historical Society (now the Chicago History Museum) and Associate Dean of the Faculty at Princeton University. In 2009, he received Phi Beta Kappa’s Triennial Award for Distinguished Service to the Humanities. (Baltimore City)

Mark Irwin served as Deputy Chief Marketing Officer and then Acting Chief Marketing Officer for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum from October 2015 to February 2017. Early in his career, Irwin led video productions in North America, Europe, the Middle East, and Japan for retail and advertising clients and the Federal Government. In the 1990s, he created communication and training products for Fortune 200 companies including Microsoft, Mayo Clinic, Ford, FedEx, and Thomson-Reuters. Beginning in 1999, Irwin developed branding strategies for Animal Planet, Discovery Health, and other networks for nine years. (Montgomery County)

Heather Mitchell is a seasoned litigator with Venable LLP with extensive experience representing businesses in complex commercial litigation, including contract disputes, healthcare matters, and more. She served as a law clerk to Judge Benson E. Legg, then Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Maryland. She has also represented clients in matters before federal courts and Maryland state courts.  A life-long Marylander, Mitchell serves as President of the Board of Directors of Baltimore County’s Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children (CASA). She is also on the Board of Directors of the Baltimore Curriculum Project. (Baltimore County)

Guffrie M. Smith, Jr. is a retired educator with a diverse career including almost 34 years with Calvert County Public Schools and 6-1/2 years with the Maryland State Department of Education. In Calvert County, he served as principal, vice principal, teacher, and more. With the State, his titles included Specialist in Migrant Education and Migrant Branch Chief. Smith has also served on regional and statewide boards and committees including the Multicultural Education Task Force. He is active with the Calvert County Historical Society, Calvert Crusade for Children, and other organizations. In 2009, The Maryland State Teachers Association granted him their Martin Luther King Community Award. (Calvert County)

Maryland Humanities is a statewide nonprofit organization that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities that inspire all Marylanders to embrace lifelong learning, exchange ideas openly, and enrich their communities. Click here for more information. Maryland Humanities is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the State of Maryland, private foundations, corporations, small businesses, and individual donors.

Call for Artists: RiverArts to Launch 2018 Year of Exhibitions

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Last Dune – Cindy Bowers Fulton

RiverArts Annual Members’ Show will soon open our 2018 year of exhibitions. All member artists are invited to submit work for this show. Open to all media and with no theme, the Members’ Show offers our artists the opportunity to exhibit some of their best work.

A favorite of artists and viewers alike, the Members’ Show both celebrates and proves the variety and vibrancy of the arts in our community. January’s show is curated by Cindy Bowers Fulton.

A note from the curator:
“This is the show you all have been waiting for.  The members’ show honors you, our wonderful members. Without you, there would be no RiverArts.

We hope you all participate so we can show our public the artistic diversity that represents our community arts center on the Eastern Shore. We have members not only from the Eastern Shore but across the bridge, and we welcome everyone to participate in this show. Let us show off our many different styles and media that we work in!!
Cheers, Cindy Fulton, curator”

Drop-off dates for the January 2018 Members’ Show differ from usual drop-off dates because of New Year’s Day.

Drop Off:

Tuesday, January 2: 10 am – 3 pm

Wednesday, January 3: 10 am – 1 pm

First Friday, January 5:  5  – 8 pm

Pick Up:

Sunday, January 28, 2 – 4 pm

Monday, January 29, 10 am – 1 pm

To register and for more information click here.

Questions: info@ChestertownRiverArts.org  or 410.778.6300

 

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Summer Jobs at Church Hill Theatre

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The cast of CHT’s Green Room Gang Senior production of Seussical JR, the 2017 Green Room Gang production

 

 

Church Hill Theatre is accepting applications for the following paid staff positions for the 2018 Green Room Gang program. The theatre requires a Green Room Gang Sr. director and a Green Room Gang, Jr. director along with two interns to work with the directors during the 5-week summer program.

Green Room Gang is a summer theatre workshop that consists of two camps. GRG Sr. is a five-week, full day program of theatre instruction for youths entering grades 6—12 that culminates in a fully staged musical for public performance. GRG Jr. is a four and a half week, half day program for youths entering grades 1—5 which also culminates in a fully staged musical production. Both camps are in session Monday through Thursday.  GRG Sr. begins June 18, 2018 and ends with performances July 19, 20 and 21, 2018; GRG Jr. starts June 20 and culminates with the production at the same time.

The directors of Green Room Gang are the instructors and artists who oversee and orchestrate the theatrical education of the Green Room Gang students and the mounting of fully scripted productions by creatively facilitating all aspects of the productions.  The directors have the challenging task of bringing together the many complex pieces of a production—the script, actors, set, costuming, lighting, sound and music—into a unified whole.  They will be responsible for all aspects of the production; however, the focus of the position is the instruction of the students and the casting, directing and rehearsing of the show.  Applicants should have extensive formal education and experience in all aspects of theatre, and should be able to work closely with young people.

The interns of the Green Room Gang will have duties that vary with the nature of the script, the director, the designers and the production facilities. An effective intern will adapt to the needs of each production. He or she will always make it his/her priority to see that the director has everything he/she needs to bring the play’s vision to the stage.  They will work closely with the directors of both GRG Jr. and GRG Sr. and will assist in instructional, directing and production aspects of the camp. The two intern positions require a HS diploma as well as college training in a variety of the aspects of theatre.

For more information and applications for any of these positions, please contact the Church Hill Theatre Executive Manager Hester Sachse at 410-556-6003.  The deadline for applications to be received by Church Hill Theatre is December 15, 2017.

 

 

 

Washington College Business Student Takes Second Place in Global Trading Challenge

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Whitney Schweizer

As a financial analyst in Washington College’s Brown Advisory Student-Managed Investment Fund Program, senior Whitney Schweizer is already an experienced investor. Under the guidance of industry expert and executive-in-residence Richard Bookbinder, Schweizer and his classmates are actively investing in a fund that has grown since its inception in June 2008 from $500,000 to $871,000 in real dollars as of October 31.

But, when the business management major from Baltimore participated in a back-to-school trading challenge in derivatives and futures trading, Schweizer finished nearly $33,000 richer—in Monopoly money—and took second place among 1,660 undergraduates around the world. Two other Washington College seniors, Tanner Barbieri and Austin Hepburn, finished among the top 70 competitors. The challenge was held by the CME Institute, an arm of the world’s leading and most diverse derivatives marketplace.

“On the first day of class [on financial derivatives], Professor [Hui-Ju] Tsai told us about this challenge, but I wasn’t totally sure about derivatives and futures trading,” Schweizer says. “I had only done stocks trading. After the first couple of weeks of class, I set up the account, took the online course, and then started the trading challenge using scenarios real in every way except the money. It’s a great way of letting students learn. It’s real life, without the consequences.”

Schweizer invested heavily in the energy sector. “It was right after Hurricane Harvey hit Houston, and I suspected fuel prices would go up,” he says. “I just didn’t think they would go up as much as they did. Refineries were shut down, and prices were affected pretty quickly. Then I diversified with wheat. I started with $100,000, and ended the week with $132,607.30.”

Even though the risks and rewards were great, Schweizer’s approach to the investment challenge didn’t stray far from the approach he’s learned to follow as a student in the investment fund program, previously known as the Alex. Brown Program. Administered by the College’s Department of Business Management and led by Richard Bookbinder, who brings his industry expertise to the weekly classes, it offers students of all majors an immersive experiential opportunity to learn about investments. The focus, as Bookbinder has taught them, is always on what’s happening in the world.

“As a group, at every meeting, we start out with current events,” Schweizer says. “We read the Wall Street Journal. We re-evaluate our portfolio. We bounce some ideas off Mr. Bookbinder. Then we start looking for the bigger picture. If it’s a consumer product, who supplies it? And we look at competitors. You want the big picture, as far out as you can get. Those are the risk-and-reward pieces.”

Schweizer seems well-suited to the world of finance. “The Alex. Brown program was the big thing that drew me here,” says Schweizer, who grew up in Baltimore and whose grandfather works for the renowned Brown Advisory firm there. “I knew I wanted to go into finance, and Washington College seemed like a good fit.”

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Academy Art Museum Opens New Exhibition – The Caprichos: Goya and Lombardo

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Emily Lombardo, Emily Lombardo Printer, Plate I from The Caprichos, 2013, Etching and aquatint, AAM 2016.032.

The Academy Art Museum will open The CaprichosGoya and Lombardo –  just in time for the holidaysThe exhibition will be on display from November 21, 2017 through February 25, 2018The Caprichos by Emily Lombardo is a series of etchings which are in direct conversation and homage to Francisco Goya’s Los Caprichos, 1799. Both explore and present a satirical critique of contemporary culture and the forces that influence society along economic, racial, political, religious, and gender lines.

Emily Lombardo states, “Copying has been the defining component of the apprentice-mentor structure since the birth of art production. The relationship was successfully completed when originality became discernible in the hand of the apprentice. My earliest apprenticeship was with a newspaper, pen, and paper. I would tirelessly copy political cartoons depicting Nixon, Reagan, Castro, and countless others, with slight understanding of the historical significance and intent of the author. This method evolved into a personal narrative, born in reaction to a lack of resonance with mainstream conversations.”

Emily Lombardo is an artist who has lived and worked in Boston for over 15 years.  She received her BFA from The Massachusetts College of Art and Design and her MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Her work has been shown and collected internationally. Lombardo applies her knowledge of sculpture and print across a wide range of conceptual projects. She engages with appropriative art practices as a mode of investigating personal and cultural identity. She resides in Brooklyn, NY.

The Academy Art Museum recently acquired Lombardo’s The Caprichos series for the Permanent Collection. The edition was published by Childs Gallery and printed at The Center for Contemporary Printmaking (Norwalk, CT) by printer Paul DeRuvo. The Art Gallery of Ontario loaned the entire set of Goya’s Caprichos so that we can exhibit the two series of prints in parallel. A publication will accompany the exhibition. The exhibition is supported by the Childs Gallery, Boston.

The Museum’s exhibitions are generously supported by the Maryland State Arts Council, the Talbot County Arts Council and the Star-Democrat. For additional information, visit academyartmuseum.org or call the Museum at 410-822-2787.

Chesapeake Music Expands Musical Offerings on Mid Shore

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Chesapeake Music is on the move, expanding its offerings in new and exciting ways.  The organization was renamed in 2015 to better reflect its overall focus of being a source for live performing arts with year-round concerts. In addition to individual concerts, Chesapeake Music exports something of the Chesapeake’s uniqueness to audiences and to musicians worldwide who take part in its annual Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival every June, the Monty Alexander Jazz Festival every Labor Day weekend, a biennial international Chesapeake Chamber Music Competition, and the new Jazz on the Chesapeake concert series. Chesapeake Music’s YouthReach Program works with area schools to bring a greater exposure of classical and jazz music to area students and its First Strings Program continues to inspire and excite 3rd and 4th graders in area schools by introducing them to the violin.

According to Courtney Kane, President of Chesapeake Music, who moved to Easton with her husband Scott from Chevy Chase, MD in 2010, “What astonished me was the quality of music the organization provides – internationally-recognized musicians performing here on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. The quality has to do with the recognition of the performers who come here. They play in the great halls of music around the world.”

Courtney Kane, President of Chesapeake Music

A number of renowned musicians have graced the stages of Chesapeake Music’s concerts and festivals. Among them are Kim Kashkashian, violist, who performs regularly at Chesapeake Music’s Chamber Music Festival each year. She received a Grammy Award in 2012 for Best Classical Solo Instrumental and in 2016 was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Another talented performer at Chesapeake Music’s Monty Alexander Jazz Festival is vocalist René Marie, who in both 2013 and 2017 had Grammy nominated songs.

Kane, who was born and raised in New Orleans, home of Mardi Gras, Dixieland Jazz and Creole cooking, grew up loving music. Her mother took her children to the symphony programs for children, introducing them to classical music. In addition, her exposure to Dixieland led her to her love of jazz music. Kane comments, “The city has a musical background. I thought living there that what we had was what everyone had.”

Kane, who enjoyed a long career in information technology sales management with IBM and Digital Equipment (DEC), also has managed individual VIP tours in France and for a time lectured on Impressionist art on riverboat tours on the Seine and Rhone rivers. She adds, “It was happenstance that we met friends who were active in Chesapeake Chamber Music. I got involved with it and the more involved I got, the more attached I got. I served as the Gala Chair and Treasurer before becoming Board President in 2016.”

Chesapeake Music is dependent on its volunteers, sponsors, donors, and committed supporters. The organization is always looking for volunteers with experience. Kane comments, “Arts volunteers are about passion. It takes faith and money to grow an arts organization. We have a rich source of volunteers in the communities we serve, but with our expanded offerings, we are always looking for new volunteers.”

In addition to its volunteers, what is unique about Chesapeake Music is the intimacy of its venues. Easton’s vibrant arts community lends itself well to the concerts we provide. These small halls, like the Academy Art Museum, The Avalon Theatre, and local churches, enable the audience to sit a few feet from the performers to take in the concert. Kane credits Executive Director Don Buxton who knows and works with every outstanding production technician within a day’s drive. She adds, “Our promise is to give our audience reliably the best in live performances, delivered locally, and at a reasonable cost. What we hope is that you will make an occasion of every event.”

The organization’s growth began when the annual Chamber Music Festival grew from a one-day festival in 1985 into a two-week event held in early June each year. Today, the Festival includes 13 concerts, recitals and open rehearsals in venues ranging from concert halls to churches, museums and waterfront estates. In 1997, the Festival established the concept of a satellite concert outside its base in Talbot County. Satellite concerts have been held in Oxford, St. Michaels, and more recently Queenstown.

In 2002, the organization expanded its operation to include the Chesapeake Chamber Music Competition, a competition for young emerging chamber music ensembles. In 2004, the first biennial Competition became international in scope, drawing from international conservatories. In 2006, the organization was approached by musician Merideth Buxton, Don Buxton’s wife, to create an outreach program, now institutionalized as First Strings. The short-term goals of First Strings Program are to help elementary school students in third or fourth grade to improve listening, gain self-confidence in performing, use teamwork to exhibit cooperation and self-control, and to have fun while learning the skills needed to play the violin. The program also offers YouthReach concerts featuring world-class musicians demonstrating and discussing their instruments with young musicians.

In July 2008, Eastern Shore Chamber Music Festival became Chesapeake Chamber Music, Inc., to better reflect the organization’s geographic location and scope near the Chesapeake Bay. That same year, Executive Director Don Buxton attended the Chamber Music America’s Annual Meeting in New York City where jazz had been a regular part of the programming.  After discussing the idea among board members about introducing jazz to the organization’s repertory, the following year, in 2009, Chesapeake Chamber Music offered a single concert featuring the renowned jazz pianist Monty Alexander and his trio to test the waters. Since then, that one concert has grown into the Monty Alexander Jazz Festival, featuring seven jazz events over Labor Day weekend each year, and drawing enthusiastic audiences from throughout the region. Most recently, Jazz on the Chesapeake expanded its programs by creating a jazz concert series to be held throughout the calendar year.

Kane reflects, “As we look to our future, our new name reflects the vision of Chesapeake Music – to continue to grow as the premier provider of professional live music performances. We continue to look for ways to be relevant in our diverse community.” She adds, “In the future, we plan to keep our programming fresh with new artists coming every year. We are planning farther out with our events. We also continue to collaborate with the Talbot County Arts Council and other organizations, as we are doing this year with our Artists-in-Residence program with the local schools.”

Chesapeake Music’s upcoming international Chamber Music Competition in April is one of the best competitions for young musicians in the world. Many great artists’ careers have been launched after receiving awards at the Competition, like the Harlem Quartet, who won the Grammy for Best Instrumental Composition in 2013, along with The Calidore String Quartet, who received the 2017 Lincoln Center Emerging Artists Award.

For further information about Chesapeake Music and upcoming events, visit chesapeakemusic.org or call 410-819-0380.

Academy Art Museum Announces New Members Join Board of Trustees

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Catherine McCoy

The Museum recently welcomed the following new board members: Daniel Canzoniero of Easton, Craig L. Fuller of Easton, Jeffrey Huvelle of Royal Oak and Washington, DC, and Nanny Trippe of Easton to its Board of Trustees. In addition, outgoing board chair Carolyn Williams of Easton (2010–17) and board member Nancy Appleby (2011–17) of Bozman were honored for their contributions to the Museum’s Board.

Director Ben Simons comments, “Carolyn dedicated her heart and soul to the Museum, and steered it with wisdom, courage, and fortitude through a time of transition and revitalization. She has become a friend and an inspiration to me, as she has to so many. We also salute and thank outgoing Secretary Nancy Appleby, who formed a key part of the leadership during the same period. Carolyn and Nancy will be dearly missed, but of course remain beloved members of the Museum family.”

Cathy McCoy was elected Chair of the Museum’s Board of Trustees, replacing Williams. McCoy, a retired corporate and securities lawyer, enjoyed an over 25-year legal career in the corporate and securities law field, the first half on the staff of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the latter half as a partner in the law firm Arnold & Porter. She has been active in a number of local nonprofits, including serving as board president of the Oxford Community Center, before becoming a trustee of the Academy Art Museum in 2015.

Simons adds, “We welcome Cathy as Chair of the Board of Trustees. As we look ahead to an exciting year celebrating the Museum’s 60th Anniversary, the leadership and future of the Museum could hardly be more secure. I’m also delighted to welcome our new board members. Each brings deep experience and passion for the Museum’s mission and commitment to helping us reach our goals in the coming years.”

New board member Daniel Canzoniero of Easton is Chief Executive Officer of Gamse Lithographing Company, Inc., which produces labels and flexible packaging for food, beverage and other consumer products companies. He serves as a director of the World Trade Center Institute in Baltimore and the Avalon Foundation in Easton, as well as President of The Graphic Source, a buying co-operative of 44 member companies. He is a member of M&T Bank’s Directors’ Council, and active in the Washington, Baltimore and Palm Beach Chapters of Young Presidents Organization (YPO).

Pictured L-R are Ben Simons, Director of the Academy Art Museum with new members of the Museum’s Board of Trustees Nanny Trippe of Easton; Jeffrey Huvelle of Royal Oak and Washington, DC; Daniel Canzoniero of Easton; and Craig L. Fuller of Easton.

Craig L. Fuller of Easton is Chairman of The Fuller Company, a strategic consulting group he organized in 1989. Most recently, he served as the president and CEO of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Previously, Fuller served eight years in the White House, first as Assistant to President Reagan for Cabinet Affairs before becoming Chief of Staff to Vice President George H.W. Bush during the second term of the Reagan Administration.  Serving on boards and as an advisor to aviation companies, Fuller has been active in aviation policy matters including serving on the FAA’s Management Advisory Council. Craig served for 10 years as a Trustee of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and currently serves as a director of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

Jeffrey Huvelle of Royal Oak and Washington, DC, is Senior Counsel with Covington & Burling LLP in Washington, DC. He is leading expert in Labor and Employment Law and has received outstanding achievement awards by the Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights and the Women’s Legal Defense Fund. He received his Juris Doctorate from Columbia Law School and his Bachelor’s Degree from Harvard College. He has served on the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and in the Peace Corps in Kenya. His civic activities have included being a Board Member, Assistant Commissioner and Coach for Stoddert Soccer in Washington, DC.

Nanny Trippe of Easton is a many-generation native of the Eastern Shore and owner of Trippe-Hilderbrandt Gallery in Easton, which exhibits the work of many fine award-winning artists in all mediums, as well as her own fine art photography. She completed a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from Washington College. She has received numerous awards for her photography, including the 2009 Plein Air Easton Award Best in Show, the Best Black and White-Aubrey Bodine Award, 2nd Place 2012 Plein Air Easton Photography Competition, 2015 Photographers Forum: Finalist and published in “Best of Photography 2015.” The Academy Art Museum held solo exhibition of her works in 2016–17: Trees: Majesty and Mystery.