Mid-Shore Arts: Lend Me a Tenor… from Goldsboro

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The Tred Avon Players have lined up a blockbuster collection of comedies for their 2017 season, and starting this weekend, this humor campaign continues with the opening of Lend Me a Tenor at the Oxford Community Center.

The recipient of Tony awards and overcoming critical praise, the play takes place in 1934 in a hotel suite in Cleveland as the local opera company prepares for its season premier with the world famous tenor Tito Merelli appearing. But as TAP’s cast and crew tell it in their interview with the Spy, things don’t always work out the way one plans it, and the characters desperately seek out a last minute replacement

The Spy sat down with producer Leigh Marquess, director Zack Schlag, and actors Nick Grande from Cambridge and young Jared Koenig from Goldsboro, to talk about the plot, the laughs, and Jared’s character Max comes out of nowhere to save the show.

Evening performances of “Lend Me a Tenor” are scheduled for Thursday (“Thrifty Thursday,” featuring two-for-one tickets), April 27; Friday, April 28; and Saturday, April 29, all starting at 7:30 p.m. A Sunday matinee on April 30 begins at 2 p.m. The following weekend, evening shows are set for Thursday through Saturday, May 4-6, at 7:30 p.m., with the run wrapping on Sunday, May 7, at 2 p.m. The Tred Avon Players are funded in part by a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council, with revenues provided by the Maryland State Arts Council.

The Eastport Oyster Boys at The Mainstay May 6

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The Eastport Oyster Boys bring their maritime goodtime music to The Mainstay for the start of the boating season in Rock Hall, MD on Saturday May 6, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Admission is $15 in advance and $18 at the door. Information and advance ticket sales are available at the Mainstay’s website http://www.mainstayrockhall.org. Reservations to pay at the door can be made by calling 410-639-9133.

In the Spring, when the sailors have burned their socks, boats are newly varnished and painted and the snowbirds have returned to put a new coat of paint on the deck chairs, it’s time for the maritime music of The Eastport Oyster Boys, the Goodwill Ambassadors for the City of Annapolis, the Maritime Republic of Eastport and the Chesapeake.

The Eastport Oyster Boys sing songs about the Bay region and the Eastern Shore from Conowingo to Ocean City. Their sound is a blend of original folk tunes, island rhythms, salsa, boogie, dixie-swing, waltzes, chanteys and some classic rock-and-roll, all with a maritime theme and an abundant sense of humor. Their songs feature deadrise workboats, oysters, good dogs, blue crabs, and other themes unique to the Chesapeake celebrating the rich maritime life and heritage of the area. Now into their third decade as a band, they may invite you to “Rock Around the Docks,” go “Downy Ocean Hon” or lament just being “Aground Again.”

Spinsheet Magazine said “The Boys’ style is fun and easy, while their lyrics sing true to the beauties and realities of living on the Bay.” Though calling the watermen’s village of the Maritime Republic of Eastport home, their songs and stories ring true in any of the Chesapeake’s harbor towns, dockyard bars, along its tributaries and in the quiet coves. Their music has been appreciated as far away as the shores of Nova Scotia, Ireland, Europe and Australia. The Boys’ spirit and music has also been featured in numerous national and international radio, television, print and film productions.

The band includes some of Eastport’s finest musicians (and boat bums): Kevin Brooks on guitar and six string banjo, the versatile Tom Guay on hammer dulcimer, fiddle and guitar, Andy Fegley on trombone and percussion, and Mike Lange on keyboards, uke and melodica.

Their concerts are a musical celebration of life on the shores of the Chesapeake and its many scenic rivers. For more than two decades they have educated, amused and delighted thousands with their wit, wisdom and special message of stewardship and appreciation for the Bay and its unique maritime culture and history. Anyone who loves being on or near the water will find they have a lot in common with The Eastport Oyster Boys whose simple philosophy can be summed up in their list of the three basic necessities of life: “a good hat, a good dog and a good boat!”

The Washington Post said, “If you’ve lost sight of why you live here, it’s time you heard The Eastport Oyster Boys. With tongues planted firmly in their cheeks, they write and sing songs about laid-back life on the Bay. They mix droll wit and a veritable cornucopia of musical styles – from Cuban jazz to Dixie swing to rockabilly to waltzes to calypso to country weepers to tangos….and they do it all with a joie de vivre that fuels good times like high octane gasoline.”

The Mainstay (Home of Musical Magic) is the friendly informal storefront performing arts center on Rock Hall’s old time Main Street. It is a 501(c)(3), nonprofit dedicated to the arts, serving Rock Hall, MD and the surrounding region. It is committed to presenting local, regional and national level talent, at a reasonable price, in an almost perfect acoustic setting. Wine, beer, sodas and snacks are available at the bar.

The Mainstay is supported by ticket sales, fundraising including donations from friends and audience members and an operating grant from the Maryland State Arts Council.

The Mainstay sells advance tickets online through Instant Seats. Information and advance ticket sales are available on the Mainstay’s website http://www.mainstayrockhall.org. Follow the Buy Tickets link to buy tickets at the advance price. If you would rather pay at the door, you can make a reservation by calling 410-639-9133 and paying by cash or check at the door.

Upcoming Mainstay performances include:
May 8 Mainstay Monday: Joe Holt welcomes Barbara Ferris & Bob Colligan
May 13 Le Vent du Nord
May 15 Mainstay Monday: Joe Holt welcomes Meredith Hadaway
May 20 A Tribute to Dick Morgan with Tadataka Unno on piano
May 22 Mainstay Monday: Joe Holt welcomes Elisabeth Engle, vocals
May 27 Caitlin Canty

Delmarva Review: Dry-Dock Music: Baltimore By David Salner

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Dry-Dock Music: Baltimore By David Salner

“It was therefore an act of supreme trust on the part
of a freeman of color thus to put in jeopardy
his liberty that another might be free.”
—from The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass

Surprising, most of all,
Stanley himself…. On the way to work that day,
he walked through clouds of cinnamon, an amber fog
enveloping the port, all the way to Fells Point
and the dry docks, where he works—

building a ship with four-pound mallet,
driving cotton-white strands between oak planks,
sealing a sharp-built hull with oakum
from keel to turn of bilge. Dry-dock music
freights the air, saw-scrape and mallet-knock,

chatter of carpenter and caulker,
craftsman and slave, of black and Irish
joined in an uneasy hug of labor. He knew the trades,
sailing and caulking, and others that a free man needs
in this slave port, like how to keep his freedom papers

always in his pocket, for the eagle stamp
protects him from slave catchers, the lowest form
of life, who love the music of another’s chains.
His papers say that he was born right here,
born free, but it was in the port of Charleston,

when he was just 15, that two white sailors
who hated slavery, grabbed him by the arms
and told a port patrolman, “This here’s
the cabin boy of our good ship, the Mother Mary.
His name is Stanley Johnson—he’s had a bit

and captain needs him sober, so let us pass.”
He had the wherewithal to play the drunk,
although he’d never had a sip, not then,
and with their help, he slipped
the chains of bondage, set sail on Mother Mary,

kidnapped into freedom. From that day on,
he’s worked on ships, on shipboard only,
where he feels free. Now that he’s old,
the ships he works on are in dry dock,
his papers always in his pocket.

They describe the bearer by his age,
color, height. . . . But they could just as easily
describe a man named Frederick, on his way
to freedom, with papers in his pocket
in the name of Stanley Johnson.

The Spy is pleased to reprint Mr. Salner’s poetry from The Delmarva Review, Volume 9. The literary journal is published by the Eastern Shore Writers Association with support from private contributions and a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council with funds from the Maryland State Arts Council. For information, visit: www.delmarvareview.com.

Maryland poet David Salner worked for 25 years as an iron ore miner, steelworker, and general laborer. In addition to the Delmarva Review, his writing has appeared in the Iowa Review, Prairie Schooner, Threepenny Review, Salmagundi, River Styx, and many other magazines. His third book, Blue Morning Light (2016, Pond Road Press), features poems on the paintings of American artist George Bellows.

Spy Moment: Love, Loss and What I Wore at the Garfield

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Veteran Director Diane Landskroener has assembled a formidable cast for the production of Love, Loss, and What I Wore, which opens Friday, April 14th at the Garfield Center for the Arts. Written by Nora and Delia Ephron and based on the book by Ilene Beckerman, the show is a scrapbook of stories about unfortunate prom dresses, the traumatic lighting in fitting rooms, high heels, short skirts and the existential state of having nothing to wear.  The NY Times called it “Breezy and perfectly enjoyable for the stray men in the room, it’s like a big bowl of buttered popcorn (but calorie-free!) for the women who can share deeply in the particulars of experience dissected and discussed.”

Cast photo, L-R: Julie Larwrence, Jennifer Kafka Smith, Jen Friedman, Hester Sachse, Melissa McGlynn. Photo and video by Jeff Weber.

The five women tasked with bringing these stories to life are no strangers to the Garfield stage. Jen Friedman, Jennifer Kafka Smith, Julie Lawrence, Melissa McGlynn and Hester Sachse have been in a number of recent shows, including Short Attention Span Theatre; My Fair Lady; The 39 Steps; The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Abridged; A Christmas Carol; Stretchmarks; and Vanya, Sonia, Masha, and Spike, to name a few.

Opening night is also Ladies Night, with a buy two, get one free special for women. Or, choose to take advantage of the Garfield’s recurring opening night discount; get $5 off when you wear your Garfield t-shirt! The show runs three weekends, from April 14th-30th. Friday and Saturday shows begin at 8pm, and Sunday matinees begin at 3pm. Tickets are $20 general admission, $15 for military and seniors 65+, and $10 for students. Tickets can be purchased online at www.GarfieldCenter.org or by calling the box office at 410-810-2060. The Garfield Center for the Arts is located at 210 High Street in Chestertown.

Delmarva Review: My Diseased Hope by Michele Whitney

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Nearly twenty years ago, after my sister was murdered, I sat across from a counselor and told her that I wanted to kill myself.

The counselor inquired if this was the first time I had those thoughts, and even though I had just experienced the most tragic loss in my life to date, those thoughts were not new, just intensified in that moment. She wanted me to seek psychiatric treatment, but wanting to take my own life was not enough for me to believe that something was medically off. I refused to go. I didn’t want to face the possibility of having to take medicine for an illness that could not come up on an X-ray or lab test.

My belief was that any so-called illness of the mind was not an actual illness; it was a weakness. I was a strong black woman, just like my mom before me and her mom before her. In the African-American community, mental illness in general, and depression specifically, is still taboo. We are expected to be strong and get over things because we have dealt with so much.

My ethnicity, upbringing, and many other theories could be the reason why I didn’t accept depression as an illness, but there was more. Ultimately, I didn’t view “hope” as an actual part of my body, such as brain cells, red blood cells, or my immune system. Hope was not a necessary characteristic of my life to keep me alive. I thought the severe lows that led to sleeping all day, daily thoughts of suicide, self-loathing, and self-hatred were normal.

It’s been more readily accepted as an illness over time, but for some reason, depression remains one of those stigmatized issues. People think you’re just crazy.

Although there may be some truth in the “crazy” label, most of us who are diagnosed with depression are diagnosed based on the symptoms. Feelings of worthlessness, overwhelming guilt, loss of interest, lack of energy and concentration, thoughts of suicide, all of this for more than a few weeks…and I can go on and on. These are obvious symptoms, but what makes it real?

The most eye-opening image I’ve ever seen in my quest to understand depression was a picture I saw on social media. The image was of two brain scans; the one on the left side represented a person with clinical depression, and the one on the right represented a person without it. The left side was dimmed, lacking the presence of light, and engulfed in a shadow of darkness and hopelessness. The right side was bright, enlightened, and glowing, and I imagined that this brain was full of hope.

Given the nature of this visual, I came to my own conclusion that depression, yes, is a real illness. This, of course, is not news. But what happened within me at this moment was that I realized, at a fundamental level, that depression occurs when people are clinically unable to have hope. I’ve come to recognize that, similar to how Alzheimer’s disease attacks brain cells, sickle cell anemia attacks red blood cells, or HIV attacks the entire immune system, major depressive disorder is a disease that attacks hope.

Years passed after that first preview with my depression destiny. I found myself in a counselor’s office yet again with the counselor making the same suggestion. Psychiatry. Medication. Chemical imbalance. But this time, something began to shift. I had just ended a two-year relationship with a married man and had spent that time surrounded by shame and secrecy. I no longer wanted to hide. I now craved a feeling of normality, if such a feeling existed. So I took my counselor’s suggestion and sought psychiatric help. I was diagnosed in my early twenties with what was then known as clinical depression, and I began a course of drug therapy that took me well into my thirties. But my story of major depression did not end there.

At the end of 2009, I left an abusive work situation, subsequently losing my income and everything I thought defined me. This included my health insurance. With no job, little income, and, more importantly, no health insurance, I made the decision to go off my antidepressants. I had dated a guy who told me I was crazy for taking meds, and my mom kept asking me when I was getting over this thing. I figured if I was ever going to try and “beat this thing,” now would be the time to do it. I “treated” my depression naturally with aromatherapy and vitamins. I was only halfway in denial. Psychotherapy remained a part of my self-made treatment plan. Luckily, by that time, I had retained the services of a therapist who took my case pro bono.

Things were okay for a little while. But leaving a job in the midst of the economic crisis made securing additional work close to impossible. In March of 2010, I ultimately lost my home, my car, and many other possessions. I made the transition from living on my own to living with my mom. I suffered severe culture shock as I went from my spacious one-bedroom apartment, where I lived independently, to a room as big as a box, where my mother treated me like I was twelve. I also took a part-time job that at the time I felt was beneath my value and qualifications. I was extremely unhappy and lonely. I sought out many solutions to cure my condition. I spent a lot of time sleeping, in isolation, irritable, and crying. This went on every single day for an entire year.

And then Christmastime came…

The holidays have always been difficult, but Christmas 2010, I felt like a stranger within my own life. I spent time with a dear friend and her family for Christmas Eve festivities. Her family had always made me feel so welcome and loved, which was something I desperately needed. But after the festivities were done and I left their home, I felt this overwhelming sense of sadness and emptiness. I cried all the way home. I couldn’t understand why, in the midst of all of that love, I felt so unloved. Life wasn’t perfect, but I still had so much to be hopeful for, I told myself. And yet I was unable to feel any hope at all. I hated myself for being surrounded by so much happiness and love and being unable to feel any of it. A person like me did not deserve to live….

I’m no genius, but I consider myself a relatively intelligent person. But life, at this point, had me completely puzzled. I could not figure out what my issues were. I only knew I needed to fix myself in some way because I was broken. I felt this tremendous pain in my heart, and I wanted it to stop. My body radiated with agony. I wanted to feel hopeful, but my brain would not allow me to get there.

It’s one thing to be depressed when everything is going wrong. But it’s another thing to be depressed when you are surrounded by love, encouragement, and positivity. There is so much shame in saying, I’m so blessed, but I’m still depressed, sad, and hopeless. I still can’t get out of the bed. I still can’t stop crying. I still don’t think my life means anything. This is a tricky disease.

When I got home from my friend’s house, I went to my room and closed the door. I kept the lights off and turned on the TV. I cried and cried and cried as I watched It’s a Wonderful Life and thought, I really don’t want to die…. Yes, like George Bailey, I wish I had never been born. But I found myself looking on the Internet for ways that I could end my life. I wanted to go to sleep and not wake up. There would be no dramatic letters or good-byes; here in the privacy of my little room, I would just disappear.

I had been prescribed Tylenol with codeine awhile back for back pain, and I hadn’t taken the entire bottle. There were about ten pills left in the bottle. I took about six of them. For some reason, nothing was happening. I wasn’t even able to sleep.

I couldn’t even do this right. This was my rock bottom.

Something was holding on to me. I literally just stopped taking pills to kill myself and began to look up suicide hotlines. I called one. The man on the line told me that he was grateful that I had called him because he got to spend this time with me on Christmas Eve. The guy obviously knew his job well, but if he was bullshitting, I didn’t care. It was something I needed to hear. I hung up the phone and eventually drifted off to sleep.

At the end of January 2011, my condition grew worse.

I began walking around like a zombie. Uninterested. Indifferent. I went to work and couldn’t remember how I got there. I’d come home and cry myself to sleep. The transforming pain that was with me on Christmas Eve was now here, sitting with me, and I could no longer deny it.

My counselor suggested I see a doctor. I still had no health insurance, but I found a doctor who was willing to prescribe an antidepressant. It wasn’t working. Here was that desperation. I felt like asking my doctor if she knew where I could buy some serotonin. Through hopeless tears, I just asked if she could up the dose of my meds. She said that was as high as she could go and suggested I see a psychiatrist.
I couldn’t afford to see a psychiatrist.

After beginning drug therapy again, and the symptoms not changing, my counselor suggested that I may have something called “treatment-resistant depression.” But I was tired of the labels. I just didn’t want to feel like this anymore. Whatever this was. I wanted to feel something other than nothing again.

An idea popped into my head. Maybe there was a depression research study somewhere that could look at my case? That way I wouldn’t have to pay for treatment; they would pay me for treatment. I put the idea in the back of my mind.

Then it all caught up with me. One morning, I woke up and literally felt nothing. I felt numb. I felt as if nothing in the world would make me happy. I thought about the things I usually enjoyed—reading a book, laughter, snuggling with the cat, watching the fish in the fish tank—and none of it sounded appealing. I couldn’t even feel God with me. I literally felt like I was null and void.
I didn’t have time to feel this. I got up, threw on some clothes, and went to the pharmacy to pick up a prescription for my mom. When I returned home, there was a commercial playing on television about a depression research study. Specifically, the study was geared toward people with treatment-resistant depression.

God was taking care of me.

The research study had an easy number to remember. I immediately called and made an appointment.

Several days later, I went to the research center. I had to answer a bunch of intake questions, and then I met with the doctor who was leading the study. He was very nice. But it turned out that for various reasons, I didn’t meet the criteria for the study. I was devastated. Done. I was never going to feel better. They gave me $20 for my time, and I cried as I slowly walked out of the research office, leaving my hope behind.

I had barely made it to the parking garage when my cell phone rang. It was the intake lady from the research center. She said, “Michele, are you still here? If so, the doctor would like to see you.”

I was thinking I may have forgotten something. I turned around, went back to the office, and sat down with the doctor. He kept looking at me, and looking at his notes. He told me there was just something about me…something about me that he just wanted to help. He told me, “You are too smart of a person to think there is no hope for depression.”

Fresh tears began to flow. He told me that he would treat me for free for three months and then continue to treat me based on whatever I could pay. And then he said something that I will never forget.
“After the three months, we can talk about payment. But your level of treatment will not change based on what you can or cannot pay.”

I squinted my eyes and looked at this doctor in disbelief. Based on everything I had told him about my story and my history with antidepressants, he believed another course of drug therapy in a new class of antidepressants would work for me. But it was more than the drugs. This doctor believed in me. He believed that my hope could be restored.

I began taking the new meds, and I eventually began to notice a difference. I was functional again. Not cured, but functional.

There are still struggles, and feeling better wasn’t just about the medication. There was work on myself I needed to do but had been unable to because my brain was sick.
Over time, I felt the darkness in my brain being replaced with light. My diseased hope is now being healed.

The Spy is pleased to republish Michele Whitney’s personal essay from The Delmarva Review, Volume 9. The literary journal is published by the Eastern Shore Writers Association with support from private contributions and a grant from the Talbot County Arts Council with funds from the Maryland State Arts Council. For information, visit: www.delmarvareview.com.

Michele L. Whitney is a writer, musician, and teacher from the South Side of Chicago. She holds an MBA as well as a MS in Human Services. Her work has appeared in the Chicago Sun Times, and her creative nonfiction is published in The Griffin, Foliate Oak Literary Magazine, r.kv.r.y, Diverse Arts Project, and Diverse Voices Quarterly. Her website is michelewhitney.net.

Chuck Redd’s Tribute to Charlie Byrd at The Mainstay April 15

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Chuck Redd

Vibraphonist Chuck Redd brings an all-star group of jazz musicians featuring Harry Allen on sax and Maucha Adnet on vocals to pay tribute to his mentor Charlie Byrd at The Mainstay in Rock Hall, Maryland on Saturday April 15, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Admission is $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Information and advance ticket sales are available at the Mainstay’s website http://www.mainstayrockhall.org. Reservations to pay at the door can be made by calling 410-639-9133.

Chuck Redd’s career as a jazz vibraphonist and drummer has taken him across decades and around the globe, but he got his start with the Charlie Byrd Trio at the age of 21. He toured and recorded with Byrd for nearly 20 years. Now, he pulls out all the stops to lead an all-star tribute to his mentor and friend Charlie Byrd, the American guitarist who brought who (along with Stan Getz on sax) brought Bossa Nova to the world, who introduced classical guitar to jazz, whose sophisticated arrangements of popular tunes continue to enchant listeners and who was a major figure in the early success of The Mainstay. This tribute to Charlie Byrd is made possible by generous support from Rebecca Byrd and Larry Schroth.

Joining Chuck Redd on vibes are the world-class saxophonist, Harry Allen, who Stan Getz once described as the “fulfillment of his idea of the perfect tenor saxophone soloist,” and the exquisite Brazilian singer Maucha Adnet, who performed, toured, and recorded with the legendary composer Antonio Carlos Jobim and Banda Nova. Both have performed at The Mainstay before and they will be joined by Nate Najar, a virtuoso who much like Byrd, plays jazz on the classical guitar. Byrd’s widow, Becky Byrd, a member of the Mainstay Board of Directors says: “There is no doubt that there is a piece of Charlie’s soul in Nate’s mind, heart and fingers.”

Harry Allen

Rounding out this all-star group will be bassist Tommy Cecil, and from London, drummer Matt Home. They will play music from the iconic, groundbreaking Charlie Byrd/Stan Getz album Jazz Samba, music made popular by Byrd’s group The Great Guitars and other music associated with Byrd from both his live performances and from his many, many recordings.

Harry Allen is known for his melodic, mainstream approach to the tenor saxophone. His golden tone and swinging musical imagination have made him a popular draw at jazz clubs and festivals worldwide. Jazz critic and senior contributor to the online website AllAboutJazz.com, C. Michael Bailey called Allen “a practitioner of such dense talent, he sounds as if he invented tenor saxophone performance instead of Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young.”

More than a decade ago, Gene Lees, the author of many books on jazz history and analysis wrote, “Stan Getz was once asked his idea of the perfect tenor saxophone soloist. His answer was, ‘My technique, Al Cohn’s ideas, and Zoot’s time.’ The fulfillment of that ideal may well be embodied in … Harry Allen.”

Maucha Adnet was born in Rio de Janeiro and started her professional singing career at the age of 15. From 1984 to 1994, she performed, toured and recorded with legendary composer Antônio Carlos Jobim and his band “Banda Nova”.  The recordings included “Antônio Brasileiro” a Grammy winner in 1995. She has also recorded with a who’s who of jazz artists including Caetano Veloso, Toninho Horta, Mário Adnet, Charlie Byrd, Trio da Paz, Harry Allen, Duduka Da Fonseca, Slide Hampton and many others. She was the guest vocalist on Randy Brecker’s Grammy winning recording “Into the Sun”.

Maucha Adnet

The website AllAboutJazz.com has perhaps the most succinct summary of Charlie Byrd’s career: “Charlie Byrd jammed with Django Reinhardt, recorded with Woody Herman, studied with the great Segovia, and with Stan Getz introduced the Brazilian bossa nova to international audiences. He then proceeded to form a super guitar trio with Barney Kessel and Herb Ellis. His musical interests took in virtually every form in which the guitar found a prominent voice.” He played mostly the nylon string classical guitar and influenced every style of music that uses the instrument.

Mainstay founder Tom McHugh attributed much of the Mainstay’s national reputation as a jazz venue to its early association with Byrd when he said, “Byrd played at The Mainstay several times.  He charged us very little, and seemed to realize that small places like ours needed nurturing. Charlie passed our name on to others…and they came and played… and soon our jazz reputation just took off.”

Byrd loved the relaxed atmosphere and fine acoustics of The Mainstay’s intimate space. His personal interest attracted many of his world-class jazz colleagues who continue to play regularly at The Mainstay to this day including all of the musicians who will take the Mainstay stage for this tribute.

The Mainstay (Home of Musical Magic) is the friendly informal storefront performing arts center on Rock Hall’s old time Main Street. It is a 501(c)(3), nonprofit dedicated to the arts, serving Rock Hall, MD and the surrounding region. It is committed to presenting local, regional and national level talent, at a reasonable price, in an almost perfect acoustic setting. Wine, beer, sodas and snacks are available at the bar.

Nate Najar

The Mainstay is supported by ticket sales, fundraising including donations from friends and audience members and an operating grant from the Maryland State Arts Council.

The Mainstay sells advance tickets online through Instant Seats. Information and advance ticket sales are available on the Mainstay’s website http://www.mainstayrockhall.org. Follow the Buy Tickets link to buy tickets at the advance price. If you would rather pay at the door, you can make a reservation by calling 410-639-9133 and paying by cash or check at the door.

Upcoming Mainstay performances include:

April 17 Mainstay Monday: Joe Holt welcomes Jodie Littleton and Pres Harding on guitar and vocals
April 21 The Steve Giordano Trio
April 24 Mainstay Monday: Joe Holt welcomes Dick Durham on piano
April 29 Cesar Orozco and Kamerata Jazz
May 1 Mainstay Monday: Joe Holt welcomes Fredy Granillo
May 6 The Eastport Oyster Boys

Working Artists Forum Annual Show Opens at Chesapeake College

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On Monday, April 3rd, the Working Artists Forum (WAF) will open their Annual Spring Show at Chesapeake College in the Todd Performing Arts Center. Member artists of WAF will display original paintings in oil, watercolor, acrylic and pastel, along with works in pen and ink, mixed media and printmaking. The Spring Show at Chesapeake College is a yearly judged event, showcasing talented member artists united in an exhibition that displays an exhilarating diversity of style and technique.

“Better Days Ahead”- oil by Amy Cummins

The Working Artists Forum is a non-profit organization of 90 professional artists who meet monthly at the Academy Art Museum in Easton for discussions, demonstrations and critiques by acclaimed artists. Membership is established by a jury composed of fellow artists. WAF members actively exhibit their work separately and together, and have pieces in private and corporate collections throughout the United States and internationally.

David Diaz, a formally trained, award winning plein air painter and teacher, currently based in Annapolis, Maryland, will be the judge for this show. Mr. Diaz’s works are included in collections within the United States, Europe and Asia.

The Working Artists Forum Spring Show at Chesapeake College is free and open to the public, Monday through Friday and during specially scheduled weekend performances. This show will hang in the lobby gallery of the Todd Performing Arts Center throughout the month of April. For more information about the Working Artists Forum, please see their website: www.workingartistsforum.com.

Spy Moment: Kenny Award Presented to Red Devil Moon Cast

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The Kent County Arts Council and the Hedgelawn Foundation gave the Hedgelawn Kenny Award annually for excellence and service in the arts in Kent County Maryland a few nights ago. The 2016 award goes to the Creators and Cast of Red Devil Moon, which performed highlights at the Garfield Center for the Arts, on Wednesday, March 22, 2017.

Recipients include: Robert Earl Price (Book & Narrator), Pam Ortiz (Music, Lyrics & Musician), Principal Singers Karen Somerville, Lester Barrett, Jr., and Jerome McKinney, and Musicians of the Pam Ortiz Band, Ray Anthony, Tom Anthony, Nevin Dawson, Philip Dutton, Bob Ortiz, and Ford Schumann.

Leslie Prince Raimond, director of the Kent County Arts Council, and Judy Kohl, director of the Hedgelawn Foundation awarded the Kenny, which this year was designed by Rob Glebe.

Hee is Leslie’s opening remarks:

“I’m Leslie Prince Raimond, director of Kent County Arts Council, and this is Judy Kohl, director of Hedgelawn Foundation

It is our great pleasure and privilege to have been involved in the Arts of Kent County for decades. Our Community continues to support and appreciate all forms of Arts and Humanities, and it is this that strengthens us. It is very exciting to once again present the Hedgelawn KENNY award given for excellence and service in the arts in Kent County, Maryland.

Our program tonight offers, once again, the chance for all of us to celebrate this contribution to our lives by these incredible artists through the universal language of music and poetry.

…. And to quote actor Wendell Pierce, That’s what art is, a form in which people can reflect on who we are as human beings and come to some understanding of this journey we are all on.

As we grapple with the concepts of society’s struggle for freedom, and equality, we can be moved by the ARTS to help us understand. Our amazingly talented cast and creators of Red Devil Moon bring us the story.”

This video is approximately for minutes in length

The High and Wides at the Mainstay

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The High and Wides bring their eclectic Americana roots music to The Mainstay in Rock Hall, Maryland on Friday March 31, 2017 at 8:00 p.m. Admission is $15 in advance and $18 at the door. Information and advance ticket sales are available at the Mainstay’s website http://www.mainstayrockhall.org and reservations to pay at the door can be made by calling 410-639-9133.

The High and Wides play music inspired by the days when the lines blurred between bluegrass, old-time, country, boogie, blues, rockabilly and western swing. It is upbeat and rocks out but still has that deep sense of its roots.

The band features three veterans of the long-time Eastern Shore bluegrass band Chester River Runoff: Marc Dykeman on guitar and vocals, Sam Guthridge on banjo/mandolin and vocals and Nate Grower on fiddle. The fourth member is jazz bass player Mike Buccino.

The High and Wides perform a wide assortment of material, from old-time brother duets to original material that defies convention. All of their music is informed by their years of playing bluegrass at clubs and festivals up and down the East Coast.

At The Mainstay, the band will be previewing material from their upcoming recording to be released later this year.

The Mainstay (Home of Musical Magic) is the friendly informal storefront performing arts center on Rock Hall’s old time Main Street. It is a 501(c)(3), nonprofit dedicated to the arts, serving Rock Hall, MD and the surrounding region. It is committed to presenting local, regional and national level talent, at a reasonable price, in an almost perfect acoustic setting. Wine, beer, sodas and snacks are available at the bar.

The Mainstay is supported by ticket sales, fundraising including donations from friends and audience members and an operating grant from the Maryland State Arts Council.

The Mainstay sells advance tickets online through Instant Seats. Information and advance ticket sales are available on the Mainstay’s website http://www.mainstayrockhall.org. Follow the Buy Tickets link to buy tickets at the advance price. If you would rather pay at the door, you can make a reservation by calling 410-639-9133 and paying by cash or check at the door.

Upcoming Mainstay performances include:

April 3 – Mainstay Monday: Joe Holt welcomes Pam & Bob Ortiz
April 7 – The Tom Lagana Group featuring George Garzone
April 10 – Mainstay Monday: Joe Holt welcomes Max Murray on bass
April 15 – Charlie Byrd Tribute with Chuck Redd, Nate Najar with special guests Maucha Adnet, vocals and Harry Allen, sax
April 17 – Mainstay Monday: Joe Holt welcomes Jodie Littleton and Pres Harding on guitar and vocals
April 21 – The Steve Giordano Trio