Garfield Center to Honor Veterans

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The Garfield Center for the Arts and The Kent County News have partnered to celebrate Veteran’s Day on Friday, Nov. 10 with the Stories in Service Celebration, an evening of stories and songs honoring our local veterans. Featuring performances by the Chester River Youth Choir and the Kent County High School Band, this free community event begins at 7 p.m. at the Garfield Center for the Arts.

William Wesley Jackson in World War II uniform

Stories in Service is the pet project of the Garfield’s Theatre Manager, Tess Hogans. Hogans began interviewing local veterans with the help of the Kent County News staff and theatre photographer Jeff Weber back in January. Her goal was to offer retired and active duty service members an opportunity to share their thoughts or memories from their time in service. Hogans was directing the Garfield’s production of Mister Roberts at the time, and during the run of the show in February 2017 there were about 50 interview posters hanging in the Garfield’s Kohl lobby for all to see. The Chestertown Spy and The Kent County News also took up the project, posting each interview.

On Nov. 10, the project expands to showcase a video that Hogans has created with photos and audio clips from a selection of the interviews that she conducted. She writes, “I was only able to print three or four sentences of the interviews on the posters. I wanted to let an audience hear more of what these remarkable men and women had to say, and in their own voices.”

William Wesley Jackson

One of the veterans interviewed in January for the project was William Wesley Jackson of Worton. Mr. Jackson was a Private First Class in the US Army during WWII, and was honorably discharged on Nov. 21, 1945 after serving under General George Patton and fighting on the beaches at Normandy. When asked about his time in service he said, “We landed on Normandy Beach. Up over the hill, there were minefields. When you went in them, you had to make the same steps you did going in and going out. Some didn’t make it back.” Mr. Jackson passed away in August of 2017. The Stories in Service celebration on Nov. 10 will be dedicated to his memory.

Any questions about the Stories in Service project or about the event can be directed to Tess Hogans by calling the Garfield at 410-810-2060 or emailing thogans@garfieldcenter.org. The Garfield Center for the Arts is located at 210 High Street in Chestertown.

 

“Analog Video Works” by Timothy Nohe Opens at Kohl Gallery Nov. 9

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“Cosmonaut” by Timothy Nohe

 

Kohl Gallery at Washington College is pleased to announce a one-person show featuring Baltimore-based artist, composer, and educator Timothy Nohe. Opening on November 9 with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m., and running through December 15, the exhibition “Voltage is Signal: Analog Video Works by Timothy Nohe” will feature works exploring analog video technology in various innovative ways.

Nohe will be in residence for the production of LightForest by the Baltimore Dance Project in Decker Theatre on November 17 and 18, a dance for which he composed the score. He will deliver a gallery talk on November 16 at 4:30 p.m. while on campus for the production.

Nohe’s work engages traditional and electronic media in civic life and public places. His practice has been focused upon sustainability and place, and musical and video works for dance and live performance. His show at Kohl in many ways marks a new direction as he departs from a typically more image-based practice to consider the ways that voltages might produce abstractions. The resulting works are resonant of past traditions, from color field to Pop, even as they emerge from an interrogation of various media.

Nohe is the founding director of the Center for Innovation, Creativity and Research in the Arts (CIRCA) and a professor of visual arts at UMBC. He was an artist in residence at the Centre for Creative Arts at La Trobe University from 2011–2014, and an adjunct professor in the faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (2011–2015). He also serves on the editorial board of the international journal, Unlikely, which is based in Melbourne, Australia.

The recipient of a Fulbright Senior Scholar Award from the Australian-American Fulbright Commission in 2006, Nohe went on to receive the Commission’s 2011 Fulbright Alumni Initiative Grant, which resulted in multiple exhibitions in the United States and Australia on view from 2012-2016. Nohe has also received multiple other awards and honors including five Maryland State Arts Council Awards, a Creative Baltimore Award, a 2011 National Endowment for the Arts and William G. Baker Fund “Our Town Project-Creative Placemaking” grant, and a 2015 Warnock Foundation grant. Nohe has exhibited and performed his work in a range of national and international venues and was commissioned as an exhibiting artist for Light City 2017, Baltimore. His contribution, Electron Drawing, will be on display in the gallery.

Kohl Gallery is located on the first floor of the Gibson Center for the Arts at Washington College. It is open Monday through Wednesday1 to 6 p.m.Saturday and Sunday11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, please email: kohl_gallery@washcoll.edu.

“Electron” by Timothy Nohe

 

“A Time to Speak” — Holocaust Memoir at Garfield Center

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Joan and Sam McReady

A Time to Speak, the remarkable story of endurance during the Holocaust, comes to the Garfield Center for the Arts Saturday, Nov. 4 at 8 p.m.  Helen Lewis, a dancer in Prague at the beginning of World War II, was interned in the Terezin ghetto, then deported to Auschwitz, and finally to Stutthof Labor Camp on the edge of the Baltic Sea.  After the war, she settled in Belfast and became active with the Lyric Theatre, Belfast.  Later she formed the Belfast Modern Dance Group, the first modern dance company in Ireland.

Her struggle to survive amidst the carnage of Hitler’s Final Solution is told with wit and a controlled anger, which never displays itself in rancor or censure. Helen died in her mid-90s; this presentation acts as a fitting tribute to an extraordinary survivor.

A Time to Speak has been adapted and directed by Northern Ireland native, Sam McCready, internationally respected actor, director, and writer.  The production, which has toured the US and Europe, was named by Baltimore’s City Paper as the outstanding production of the year when it was presented by Performance Workshop Theatre.

Helen’s story is performed by Joan McCready, an experienced actress who has moved audiences in Europe and the US with the extraordinary sensitivity and truthfulness of her portrayal. This incredible story of survival will be at the Garfield Center for one night only.

Tickets are $15 and can be purchased online or by calling the box office at 410-810-2060. The Garfield Center for the Arts is located at 210 High Street in Chestertown.

Mid-Shore Arts: The Pleasure and Science Behind Listening Live to Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons

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The Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra returns to Easton on November 2 and will be offering up a number of remarkable orchestral work that would stand out any time and in any season. The list for November’s performance includes Autumn Legends by William Alwyn featuring Carl Oswald on Oboe and the Symphony No. 45 by Joseph Haydn, affectionately known as the “Farewell” Symphony, composed to celebrate the annual migration of summer musicians back to their families after performing for Prince Nikolaus Esterház at his summer palace at Eszterháza in Hungary.

All good stuff, but the main attraction at the Easton Church of God on that Thursday night is none other than Antonio Vivaldi’s classic Le Quattro Stagioni (the Four Seasons).

Some in the stratified world of classical music might complain that this old workhorse of a crowd pleaser is hardly adventurous terrain for such a gifted collection of superior musicians, but the fact of the matter is this 1723 composition of Vivaldi serves many purposes beyond its orginal intent.

While it is true that the The Four Seasons might be the most popular classical music only  after the the works of Beethoven, its popularity with both musicians and audiences rests on a number of surprising cofactors that makes it so memorial but also so important to be performed.

The first of which is the simple fact that musicians love playing the Four Seasons. While they may intellectually pine at times for the challenges of far more sophisticated and contemporary work, these gifted artists also understand, as the MSO’s music director, Julien Benichou, notes in our Spy interview, it’s simply “great music.”

There is also some good science that backs up the claim that those that hear a live performance of  The Four Seasons feel significantly more alert while EEGs suggest the music impacted “two distinct cognitive processes by producing “exaggerated effects” on one component of mental activity that is tied with the “emotion-reward systems within the brain,” and increasing cognitive functioning.

One can get lost in the weeds here, but the takeaway, as Jeffrey Parker, the MSO’s board president, suggests, is that Vivaldi’s masterpiece is the auditory equivalent of meeting of dear old friend.

That’s hard to beat.

This video is approximately two minutes in length. For ticket information about this performance and others by  Mid-Atlantic Symphony Orchestra please go here

Habitat: Artists Take Over a Building in Easton

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As property owners continue to ponder how they might transition their light industrial space in small Mid-Shore communities into more viable opportunities, one solution can be found on a seldom frequented street in South Easton where artists have taken over the building.

In this case, the artists have not only signed leases but contributed both time and money in making the needed enhancements for habitable studio space after years operating as a machine shop. And over the last several years have combined forces to create what is now called the Davis Art Center.

This was not an overnight success. At first, visual artists and musicians would happen upon the old building almost by accident in their search for working space. And one by one, they came to the same conclusion that the Davis building had all the critical ingredients required to provide functioning galleries including large windows, tall ceilings solid “bones.”

The Spy caught up with two of the pioneering artists that took a chance on Davis Street.  The first, Elizabeth Casqueiro, left a career in architecture to focus on her artwork, and now shows her work in her native Portugal, the World Bank gallery in Washington to the Massoni Gallery in Chestertown. The second is Heather Harvey, who is currently serving as the chair of the Art and Art History Department at Washington College.

Both of these talented artists reflect on why they agreed to invest in the Davis Center as well as what it means for the seventeen other artists who are now a part of a thriving art community.

This video is approximately three minutes in length. For more information about the Davis Art Center and the artists based there please go here

Spy Eye: Fired Up! Academy Art Museum’s Crafts Show Opens on Friday

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Your first minutes at this weekend’s vibrant 2017 Academy Craft Show – Fired Up will give you even more proof of the delightful revitalization of the Shore’s own Academy Art Museum.  This regional jewel is becoming a ‘destination museum’ because of its exhibits, its creativity and its first-class events like the prestigious, juried, annual Craft Show happening October 20-22 in Easton.

Half the 70 artists are ‘new to this show’ for 2017. “That keeps us so fresh,” says Holly Fine, Museum Board member, artist, and 2017 Craft Show Chair. “The entire Shore should be proud,” she adds, “that so many nationally recognized artists ask to be invited into our show.”  This year, the applicant pool was twice as large as the show itself.  The large pool results from outreach by Fine and her team to high-caliber artists, aided by the Show’s growing reputation that now – apparently – travels alone and can sometimes get there first: “A number of artists,” Fine says, “are now finding us.”

The Academy Craft Show has grown in significance in its 20 years:  The 2017 show has more total artists than ever, more exhibits than ever, more artists-new-to-the-show than ever and more artists applying than ever and even a larger wait-list than ever.  And the Show’s public Raffle of artworks donated by show artists has more high-end artworks to win, than ever.

A teapot by ceramicist Lucy Dierks.

The 2017 artists hail from 18 states, coast to coast, including Maryland.  “So many,” Holly Fine says, “are at the top of their game, and certainly give us the ‘WOW factor’.”

The word “honored” signals they are talking about internationally celebrated ceramicist Bennett Bean who returns with his wisdom and quick humor to be the 2017 Academy Craft Show Honorary Chair and Visionary

Artist for all three days.  The phrase “real legend” signals that they are talking about the return of Mary Jackson herself, the MacArthur Fellow who preserved the Gullah tradition of weaving exquisite sweet-grass baskets.  And they say “thrilled” rightfully about so many other artists invited again, like J.J. Reichert who imagines and makes one-of-a-kind handbags that other people just, can’t.

And “exciting” is the word for every ‘new-to-show’ artist: Vermont goldsmith Jacob Albee combines gems and slices of meteorite – yes, meteorite – into pins, rings, wearable things men and women will happily attach to themselves.  Geoffrey Roth of Sedona styles ‘statement watches’ for men and women, timepieces of such immaculate precision that his work is deemed “watch engineering.”  Laurie Olefson makes sure you can actually use her “Optical Art,” her playful, pretty, eyeglass frames, through connections with actual Opticians.

Paul Willsea blows swirling colored luminous glass forms that will own the wall on which they will hang.  Designer Andrea Geer’s unique clothing gracefully floats on you while being completely cutting-edge.  Lucy Dierks’ ceramics mimic nature, hoping you’ll hear the clay birds perched on her teapots and vases.  Maryland’s Mea Rhee turns her clay vessels into the sweet bell-shape of Korean traditional dress and also turns an endearing pottery-salute to Asia’s elephants. 

Glass by glass blower Paul Willsea.

And this year, Shore businesses and neighbors set records as more than ever stepped up to sponsor the Craft Show and through it, the Museum; dozens of Shore businesses, starting with Easton Utilities, Ameriprise International and PURE Insurance.  “These businesses do not have to do this,” Fine says, “but they genuinely understand the critical role of art in a community’s overall health.” Fine also says the public should thank them: “We put every one of the sponsor names on the Craft Show website and encourage the public to take a look and learn who the good guys are.” However, she adds, “Support is never a spectator sport: Everyone can support the arts, this time while having real fun with the Craft Show.” “Every purchase of one Party ticket,” says Fine, “and one Show admission ticket, every Raffle ticket, helps the arts and yes, it matters.”

All 70 artists will be at all events on all three days at the Academy Art Museum in Easton.  The Preview Party with the Artists is Friday, October 20 from 6 to 9 p.m. “The party is elegant and fun,” says Fine. “There will be artists, oysters, libation stations, all to the music of Kentavius Jones.”

Raffle items this year are worth more than $75 each; most are worth many times that.  Yet Raffle tickets are only $5 each, and five tickets bundle for $20. They can be bought online at AcademyCraftShow.com.

Check out one more “first-ever,” AcademyCraftShow.com, the new, information-packed website.  Every 2017 artist is there, illustrated, profiled, and linked.  The donated Raffle artworks are there.  So are the names of the business and citizen sponsors who deserve public thanks.  And the links are active for everyone to buy their Admission, Raffle and Preview Party tickets online.

To be there, go here for all information and online ticket sales: AcademyCraftShow.com.BOX

The 2017 Academy Craft Show – Fired Up! The Academy Art Museum, 106 South Street, in Easton, Maryland

Preview Party with the Artists, Friday, October 20, 6 to 9 p.m. Tickets: $100 each and include complimentary show admission ticket and Raffle TicketShow Admission tickets for Saturday, October 21, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, October 22 from 10 a.m.  to 4 p.m.  Tickets: Museum members $10 each; Non-members $12 each. To celebrate the Show’s 20th year: ONE ADMISSION TICKET IS GOOD FOR BOTH DAYS OF THE SHOW! Academy Craft Show Raffle TicketsTickets: $5 per ticket OR Five-ticket bundle for $20. No limit on ticket purchases.

 

The 2017 Academy Craft Show – Fired Up!

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The 2017 Academy Craft Show – Fired Up! happening this weekend.

The Preview Party with the Artists on Friday, October 20, 6 to 9 p.m. Awards & Brief Program: 7:30 p.m.

Craft Show Hours: Saturday, October 21, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday, October 22, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

70 Artists, Live Demonstrations, Raffle of Artists’ Works, and “Little Crafters” at the Academy Art Museum & Waterfowl Armory.

This weekend’s 2017 Academy Craft Show – Fired Up (AcademyCraftShow.Com) – the prestigious, juried show which has grown into a mainstay resource for the Academy Art Museum — is fresh and full of “firsts” for the Show’s 20th Anniversary.  This weekend, it brings 70 nationally-acclaimed artists to Easton from more than 18 states and a dozen fields of high-end craft. Breathtaking ceramics, sparkling glass, cutting-edge fashion and bags, precision-engineered watches, jewelry fused from meteorite and gems and much more.  The 2017 Academy Craft Show has more total artists than ever, more exhibits than ever; more artists-new-to-this-show than ever; more artists applying than ever; and even a larger wait-list than ever. And the Craft Show’s public Raffle of artworks donated by show artists has more high-end artworks to win, than ever.

All 70 artists will be at all events on all three days starting with Friday evening’s elegant and fun Preview & Awards Party featuring oysters, libation stations, and the music of Kentavius Jones.

The Craft Show is an important, major fundraiser for the Museum and a delightful way for the entire community to support its many community-based programs for all ages.

Academy Art Museum Announces November Events

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Bennett Bean, M# 1806 Triple on Base, 2015 Pit fired, painted and gilded earthenware clay Photographed by Barbara Livar.

EXHIBITIONS

Exhibitions are generously supported by the Maryland State Arts Council, the Talbot County Arts Council and the Star Democrat.

Bennett Bean: Be Careful What You Fall in Love With
Through November 5, 2017
Curator-Led Tours: Wednesday, November 1, 11 a.m.
Bennett Bean (1941) is an American ceramic artist best known as a ceramicist for his treatment of vessels post firing. He works in a range of media including stone, precious metals, wool and silk weaving, and painting. The Easton exhibition, his first solo museum exhibition.

David Driskell: Renewal and Form, Recent Prints
Through December 31, 2017
Noted artist and scholar, David Driskell, PhD, (1931) is widely respected as an artist, curator, educator, and scholar of African-American art. He is Professor Emeritus of Art at the University of Maryland, College Park, and where the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora honors his contributions to the field. The exhibition comes to Easton from the Center for Maine Contemporary Art, in Rockland, ME, and was curated by Greenhut Galleries in Portland, ME.

The Caprichos: Goya and Lombardo
November 21, 2017–February 25, 2018
The Caprichos by artist Emily Lombardo is a series of etchings which are in direct conversation and homage to Francisco Goya’s Los Caprichos, 1799. Both series address major cultural issues of their times through the medium of print. The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) has generously agreed to lend the complete set of Goya’s Los Caprichos, 1799 for the exhibition. The exhibition is supported by the Childs Gallery, Boston.

David Driskell, The Hibiscus, Linocut.

The Soothsayers: 3D Works on Paper by Emily Lombardo
November 18, 2017–March 11, 2018
The Soothsayers is an installation of sculptural prints which represent excavated hearts from Magic 8 Ball toys that are positioned as divine relics of cultural nostalgia. The Magic 8 Ball was created in 1950, invented by Albert C. Carter, inspired by a spirit writing device used by his mother, a clairvoyant.

Helen Siegl: Fantasy Creatures from the Museum’s Collection
Through November 26, 2017
Helen Siegl (1924–2009) used an unusual printmaking technique—often combining various kinds of blocks and plates to create an image, including handmade plaster blocks. She designed these when wood was scarce in Vienna during World War II. Siegl gained a reputation for both her individual signed and numbered prints and for her book illustrations.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Open MIC
Second Monday Each Month
7 to 9 p.m.
The Academy Art Museum’s Open Mic is a monthly occasion for our community to share and appreciate the rich tapestry of creativity, skills and knowledge that thrive in the region. The theme for November 13 is “Gratitude.” Contact Ray Remesch at RayRemesch@gmail.com for additional information.

Fall Portfolio Night
Wednesday, November 29th, 2017, 6–8 p.m.
Free
Area high school students are encouraged to bring their artwork to the Museum’s Annual Portfolio Night to receive expert tips on what makes a winning portfolio from a panel of art school representatives and professional artists. Contact the Museum’s Director of ArtReach and Community Programs, Constance Del Nero, at cdelnero@academyartmuseum.org or 978-902-1993 for more information.

Francisco de Goya, Spanish, 1746 1828, From Los Caprichos, 1799, Art Gallery of Ontario, 1999.

LECTURES

Kittredge-Wilson Lecture Series
These lectures feature an exciting array of speakers who impart a diversity of perspectives on subjects such as art, architecture, history and literature. Series Tickets: (6 lectures) $125 Members, $150 Non-members. Pre-registration is suggested. Register online at academyartmuseum.org.

Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello
Leslie Greene Bowman, President of the Thomas Jefferson Foundation
Friday, November 17, 6 p.m.
Individual Tickets: $24 Members, $29 Non-members

ARTS EXPRESS BUS TRIPS

Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry
National Gallery of Art
Tuesday, November 7
Cost: $60 Members $72 Non-members

CHILDREN’S PROGRAMMING

Mini Masters Academy
An Early Enrichment Program for Children ages 2–5 Years Old
In Partnership with the Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
Morning or Full-Day Program – Classes through May 24, 2018
Mini Masters Academy introduces young children to new ideas through a thematic approach to learning that emphasizes relationships and the ability to make meaningful connections. The rich resources of the Academy Art Museum offer a wonderful venue for teaching these sensory explorations. Enrollment is ongoing. Contact Janet Hendricks for program details at jhendricks@academyartmuseum or (410) 822-2787.

Helen Siegl, Goose Waddle, Woodcut on tissue paper, AAM 2012.012.34.

Painting with Photoshop
Instructor: Chris Pittman
Students Grades 4–8
Dates: 6 classes–Mondays and Wednesdays: October 30, November 1, 6, 8, 13, 15
Time: 4:30–5:30 p.m.
Cost: $85 Members, $95 Non-members

ADULT PROGRAMMING

Adult Classes

Drawing

The Landscape in Ink Washes
New Instructor: Daniel Riesmeyer
5 weeks: November 1–December 6 (no class November 22 for Thanksgiving)
Wednesdays, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.
Cost: $175 Member, $210 Non-members

Painting

Get Painterly! Palette Knife Painting in Oil or Acrylic
Instructor: Diane DuBois Mullaly
2 days: November 4 & 5 Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.
Cost: $145 Members, $174 Non-members

Rosemary Cooley

Oil Painting: Creating Color Harmonies
Instructor: Bradford Ross
4 weeks: November 7 – 28, Tuesdays, 10 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Cost $125 Members, $155 Non-members

Pastels

Pastel: Sunrise, Sunset and a Nocturne
Instructor: Katie Cassidy
4 weeks: November 29–December 20
Wednesdays, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.
Cost: $160 Members, $192 Non-members

Printmaking

Printmaking Exploration Evenings
Instructor: Sheryl Southwick
Session 3–November 7, 14, 16, 21
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:30–8 p.m. Cost: $80 Members per session, $96 Non-members per session (plus $25 materials fee paid to instructor on first day.)

Printmaking Workshop: The Poetry of Water Woodcut Resist Monoprint
Instructor: Rosemary Cooley
3 days: November 3, 4 and 5 Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m.–2 p.m.
Cost: $185 Members, $222 Non-members (plus $35 materials fee paid to instructor on first day.)

Digital

Movies, Music and Smart TV – – Holiday Entertainment for the Whole Family
Instructor: Scott Kane
2 Days: Wednesdays, November 29 and December 6, 6–8 p.m.
Cost per class: $50 Members, $60 Non-members
High School Students Outreach

For additional information, visit academyartmuseum.org or call the Museum at 410-822-2787.

Mid-Shore Arts: Marc Castelli’s ‘Swinging the Lantern’ at Massoni Gallery Begins October 20

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For nearly a quarter of a century, Marc Castelli has been exhibiting his stunning watercolors of the workboats, watermen, historic log canoes and sporting events of the Chesapeake at the Carla Massoni Gallery in Chestertown, Maryland.  Swinging the Lantern, his annual one –man exhibition opens on October 20 and continues through December 2.  Collectors and friends will have the opportunity to visit with Castelli and attend the Collector’s Reception on Friday, October 20, from 6-8 pm.

The festivities continue the following week with the Sultana Education Foundation’s annual Downrigging Weekend from October 27-29.  Massoniart is proud to have been an event sponsor of this premier tall ship and wooden boat festival since its inception.  The Gallery is hosting a reception for the opening of Downrigging on Friday, October 27, 5-7:30 pm where they will welcome the return of the Kent County Watermen’s Association to shuck oysters out on the sidewalk followed by Sultana’s Fireworks at the foot of High Street.  During the weekend we sponsor an Open House on Saturday from 10-7 pm and Sunday From 11-3 pm.  But wait – there’s still more – plan to stay in the party mood through Chestertown’s First Friday Celebrations November 3, 5-8 pm and December 1, 5-8 pm.

During Downrigging, Marc Castelli will be honored with a special exhibition, Building Sultana – A Selection of Marc Castelli Paintings, at the Sultana Education Foundation’s new center. Between 1997 and 2001, Castelli captured the construction of the schooner SULTANA in more than 50 vibrant watercolor paintings. Taken together, these works represent one of the finest and most complete artistic surveys of the construction of a traditional wooden schooner produced over the last half century. Most of Castelli’s paintings of Sultana’s construction were rapidly acquired by private collectors, and haven’t been seen by the public for almost 20 years.  With the assistance of Marc Castelli, MASSONIART, and multiple private collectors, the Sultana Education Foundation is assembling a selection of these paintings for a special Downrigging Weekend exhibit. Also of note, Castelli’s “Building Sultana” exhibit shares its name with a new limited-edition book of his pen and ink drawings of the construction of Sultana that will be released during a special event at 6:00pm on Saturday, October 28 at Sultana’s Holt Center.

Castelli is considered a master of his genre.  He is on the water over 100 days a year gathering material to paint. Forty years of crewing on racing sailboats, and over twenty years actively participating on workboats has enabled him to get past the spectator view that represents the majority of marine and regional art.

The potential for abstraction, still life, figurative, atmospherics and sharp focus vignette, may exist in all the subject areas he explores but for Marc it is the strongest when on the water. It is the light, as it moves on and in water and is then reflected back on the watermen and their boats, that pulls at him.  Wherever he trains his focus, from the Sultana to the simplest of skiffs, he brings to the viewer a deeper understanding of the magic of the Chesapeake.

This year his annual exhibition, Swinging the Lantern, features over forty new watercolor paintings with a full range of subjects guaranteed to delight both collectors and those new to his work.

For additional information please contact Carla Massoni at 410-778-7330 or visitwww.massoniart.com. To learn more about Sultana Downrigging Weekend visitwww.sultanaeducation.org