A Talk on James Joyce by Dr. Philip Sicker on March 21

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Philip Sicker, professor of English and author of literature on the work of Henry James, James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, and others, will speak at the Rose O’Neill Literary House on Wednesday, March 21. The event, which is part of the annual Sophie Kerr Lecture Series, is entitled “In the Eyes of God: Surveillance and Being in Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist and Ulysses.” The talk will start at 4:30 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

Philip Sicker is a professor of English at Fordham University in Bronx, NY. He has a BA from the University of Cincinnati, and an MA and PhD from the University of Virginia. Interested in modern British and continental fiction, he is the author of Love and the Quest for Identity in the Fiction of Henry James (Princeton, 1980), and numerous articles on Joyce, Mann, Eliot, Lawrence, Nabokov, novel theory, and film. He is the co-editor of Joyce Studies Annual. His newest book, Ulysses, Visual Technologies, and Culture, is forthcoming this year by Cambridge University Press.

For more information on this and other English Department and Sophie Kerr events, visit the website at www.washcoll.edu/departments/english/events.php, or view our annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/7406-2017-2018.

Amy Hempel to Read at the Rose O’Neill Literary House March 27

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Short fiction writer and journalist Amy Hempel will be reading at the Rose O’Neill Literary House on Tuesday, March 27 at 5:30 p.m. The event, which is a part of the spring Literary House series, is free and open to the public.

Hempel is the author of four short story collections. Her Collected Stories (Scribner, 2006) won the Ambassador Award for Best Fiction of the Year, was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, and was named one of the New York Times’s Ten Best Books of the Year.

Hempel’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Harper’s, GQ, Vanity Fair, The Quarterly, and the New York Times Magazine, among many others. Her work has been translated into more than two dozen languages. Her awards and honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, a United States Artists Foundation Fellowship, the PEN/Malamud Award for Literary Excellence, and the Harold D. Vursell Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

In 2008, she won the REA Award for the Short Story. Newly elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Hempel has taught at Harvard, Princeton, NYU, Sarah Lawrence, and Bennington, and now teaches at Stony Brook University.

For more information on this and other events, view our annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/7406-2017-2018. For more information on the Literary House, visit www.washcoll.edu/centers/lithouse/.

Political Strategist Sean Rapelyea to Speak at WC March 26

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Sean Rapelyea ’08, who has worked for the campaigns of Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and now Illinois gubernatorial candidate J.B. Pritzker, will return to campus on March 26 as part of the Goldstein Program’s Young Alumni Series.

Rapelyea’s talk, which begins at 5 p.m. in Hynson Lounge, will encompass his burgeoning career in politics, having worked as a field organizer for the Obama and Clinton presidential campaigns, as well as an assistant to Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. As all eyes turn toward the 2018 midterm elections, he’ll share his insight into how campaigns and politics at the local level of government, whether in rural or urban areas, will shape the fortunes of Democratic candidates this fall.

The talk is free and open to the public.

Rapelyea is currently the political director for Illinois gubernatorial candidate J.B. Pritzker. He previously served as Illinois political director for the Hillary For America campaign during the general election, where she garnered a 17–point win margin. Rapelyea also served as deputy director of government affairs for the Office of the Mayor in Chicago after working as a regional field director and advisor to Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s 2011 and 2015 re-election campaigns. In 2010, he worked on Arkansas Senator Blanche Lincoln’s primary, runoff, and general election campaigns. He began his campaign work with then-Senator Barack Obama’s Campaign for Change, working in Missoula, Montana.

Rapelyea, who majored in English, says a minority politics class taught by Christine Wade, professor of political science and international studies, during his junior year “really opened my mind and sparked my interest in electoral politics.”

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Kohl Gallery Features Student Work in New Exhibit March 23

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Washington College’s talent and creativity will be on display in the Kohl Gallery’s annual student exhibition “100 Proof,” which runs March 23 through April 9 with this year’s theme of “Expand Space/Share Place.” Students will welcome guests at a free, public opening reception on March 23, from 5-7 p.m., and will talk about their work in the gallery from 5:30-6p.m.

The students’ submissions have been selected by guest juror Allison Nance, director of the Hillyer Art Space, and Renee van der Stelt, interim director of the Kohl Gallery, with an eye toward relationships to the theme“Expand Space/Share Place.”A wide range of materials and emerging art forms are represented in this group exhibition.

Students included are: Tatiana Baughman, Morgan Bench, Jess Burns, Picabo French, Rachel Frebert, Dylan Grimes, Annie Grosscup, Cameron Gilson, Drake Harrison, Tia Johnston, Rachel Kanaskie, Alaina McCleary, Andrew Poe, Alex Riedel, Kyle Rugletic, MadiShenk, Aaron Wallace Holland, Chenlin Wang, Anna Watts, Casey Wohlar, Xidan Zhange.

Regular gallery hours are Wednesday through Friday, 1-6p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 11-4p.m. For more information see www.washcoll.edu/kohlgallery.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

Women’s League Announces Fine Dining in Kent County Raffle

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The Women’s League of Washington College is selling raffle tickets at Saturday’s Chestertown Farmers Market .  The winner will receive for a a bundle of three $100 gift certificates, one of each to Osprey Point Inn, Chester River Yacht & Country Club, and Luisa’s Cucina.  Tickets are $10 each or three for $20.  The drawing will be held at the Women’s League Spring Scholarship Luncheon on March 20.

Since its founding in 1951, the Women’s League of Washington College has contributed more than $370,000 to the College.  Its mission is to “foster closer relationships between the college and the community and to sponsor scholarships and other projects to benefit the college.”  The organization is open to all interested women; it is not necessary to be a graduate of the college to participate.

For further information please visit www.FaceBook.com/WLofWC.

Professor Melissa Deckman Brings Her Expertise to Gender Watch 2018

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Melissa Deckman, Chair and Professor of Political Science, has been named to take part in Gender Watch 2018, a new, non-partisan project to track, analyze, and illuminate gender dynamics in election 2018. Developed by the Barbara Lee Family Foundation (BLFF) and the Center for American Women in Politics (CAWP) at Rutgers University, Gender Watch 2018 is a response to the growing political activism of women since the 2016 presidential election.

Deckman, author of Tea Party Women: Mama Grizzlies, Grassroots Leaders, and the Changing Face of the American Right, and co-author of Women and Politics, is sought by news outlets from The Washington Post to the BBC, Morning Joe, and The Guardian for her insight into and analysis of the role of women in politics.

“We are living in a fascinating moment for women in politics,” Deckman says. “I’m excited and honored to be part of this project to help examine, document, and witness this dynamic and evolving shift in the political climate and culture.”

“Since the Women’s March last year, we’ve witnessed an unprecedented wave of political activism and participation powered by women,” Barbara Lee, President and Founder of The Barbara Lee Family Foundation, said in announcing Gender Watch 2018. “This year, women are running for office in record numbers, and Gender Watch 2018 will follow their journeys, offering real-time analysis and insight into the impact of gender on this historic election year.”

Kelly Dittmar, Gender Watch 2018 Project Director and CAWP Scholar, will be joining Deckman at Washington College on March 22 as part of the panel discussion “Women on Fire: How Trump and the #MeToo Movement are Shaping the 2018 Elections.”

“Gender is at play in all aspects of political campaigns, from the messages and behavior of candidates to the ways in which media and voters evaluate candidates and engage with campaigns,” Dittmar says. “Gender Watch 2018 will provide expert analysis of these sometimes overlooked sites for gender influence in races across the country this year.”

The project will draw upon the research and expertise of both partner organizations, as well as contributing scholars and practitioners, to inform the public dialogue and enhance public understanding of the myriad ways in which gender shapes political campaigns and campaigning.

Resources on the new website include analysis and commentary from political strategists and academics, information about women candidates, relevant research summaries and reports, and more to bridge the divide between scholarship and political practice. More information and biographies of all of the contributing experts are at http://www.genderwatch2018.org./

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

WC’s Next Edible Education Talk is Set for March 7

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Washington College’s Center for Environment & Society continues its new Edible Education series with a public lecture, In Pursuit of a Better Food System: Lessons from the Berea College Farm, by Sean Clarkon Wednesday, March 7 at 4:30 p.m. This event, in Hynson Lounge, is free and open to the public.

Sean Clark is the Farm Director and Professor of Agriculture and Natural Resources at Berea College in Kentucky. Berea College maintains the oldest continuously operating educational student farm in the United States, producing vegetables, fruits, grains, hay, pork, beef, chicken, turkey, and more for the campus and local community. Recent initiatives aimed at improving the farm’s sustainability have yielded benefits as well as insights into often-unseen trade-offs between our values, decisions, and actions. Clark will explore the lessons learned at operating a student educational farm and how we can apply such lessons in the pursuit for a better food system.

To learn more about the Center for Environment & Society or for more information on this and other events please visit www.washcoll.edu/centers/ces.

WC to Confer Honorary Degree on Frederick Douglass on Feb. 23

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On the bicentennial of Frederick Douglass’s birth, Washington College is posthumously awarding the famed abolitionist orator, author, and statesman the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws. Douglass’s great-great-great grandson, Kenneth Morris, co-founder and president of the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives, and David Blight, a professor of history at Yale University and director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition, will offer remarks and receive the College’s Award for Excellence.

The free, public event, part of the annual George Washington’s Birthday Convocation, is slated for Friday, Feb. 23, beginning at 4:00 p.m. in Decker Theatre, Gibson Center for the Arts. The ceremony will also be livestreamed: https://www.washcoll.edu/offices/digital-media-services/live/

“Two hundred years after his birth, it is truly an honor for Washington College to recognize the tenacity and the moral courage Frederick Douglass exhibited by speaking out in support of equal rights for all men and women,” says College President Kurt Landgraf.

Born into slavery in February 1818, not far from the College’s campus on Maryland’s Eastern Shore,Douglass came to understand at a very young age that education would be his path to freedom: “Knowledge unfits a child to be a slave,” he wrote. In 1838, he escaped slavery and spent the rest of his life speaking out on human rights issues, including abolitionism and women’s rights, in addition to serving as a federal official and diplomat. His first autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845), is taught in universities around the world. Yet Douglass himself never had a college education, and Washington College is believed to be the first institution to award him an honorary degree since Howard University did so in 1872.

When Douglass was born, Washington College—the first college in Maryland and one of the oldest in the United States—had already existed for almost 40 years. Among its founding donors, alongside George Washington, were members of the Lloyd family, on whose Eastern Shore plantation Douglass was enslaved during his childhood. The College remained a racially segregated institution until the late 1950s.

“Even without a formal education, Frederick Douglass steeped himself in newspapers, political writings, and treatises to become one of the most famous intellectuals of his time,” Landgraf says. “Washington College should have been thrilled to enroll such a promising scholar. We can’t change that history, but we can and should learn from it.”

The event coincides with Black History Month and a program organized by the College’s Office of Student Affairs, “The Black Experience: From Slavery to Modern Times.” Over the course of several weeks, students and faculty will learn about and discuss contributions African Americans have made to our society, as well as the legacy of slavery that remains. They will visit the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad State Park and Douglass sites in Talbot County, as well as Cedar Hill, Douglass’s home in southeast Washington that is now a National Historic Site. For a complete listing of events commemorating Frederick Douglass’s bicentennial, visit https://www.washcoll.edu/offices/student-affairs/frederick-douglass-bicentennial/index.php

As part of the Douglass centennial activities on Feb. 23, members of the College’s Black Student Union will deliver copies of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas: An American Slave to eighth-graders at Chestertown Middle School. Morris will join them; to honor Douglass’s 200th birthday, Morris’s family foundation is distributing one million hardcover copies of the book to middle-schoolers across the country.

The Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives is a modern abolitionist organization dedicated to teaching today’s generation about one of the most influential figures in American history and raising awareness about the ongoing crisis of human trafficking.

As director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University, David Blight oversees the annual Frederick Douglass Book Prize and other public outreach programs regarding the history of slavery and its abolition. Blight is considered the nation’s foremost Douglass scholar; he recently completed the first major biography of Frederick Douglass in more than 20 years, which will be published later in 2018 by Simon and Schuster.

During Convocation ceremonies, recipients of the President’s Medal, the President’s Distinguished Service Awards, and the Alumni Service Award will also be honored.

About Washington College

Founded in 1782, Washington College is the tenth oldest college in the nation and the first chartered under the new Republic. It enrolls approximately 1,450 undergraduates from more than 35 states and a dozen nations. With an emphasis on hands-on, experiential learning in the arts and sciences, and more than 40 multidisciplinary areas of study, the College is home to nationally recognized academic centers in the environment, history, and writing. Learn more at washcoll.edu.

A Valentine’s Day Tea and Talk with Professor Elena Deanda

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Washington College’s very own Elena Deanda-Camacho will be giving a faculty tea and talk on Wednesday, February 14, as part of the spring Literary House Series. The event will be held at 4:30 p.m. in the Rose O’Neill Literary House, and it is free and open to the public.

Elena Deanda-Camacho is an associate professor of Spanish and Director of the Black Studies Program at Washington College. She received her BA from the University of Veracruz, Mexico, and her PhD at Vanderbilt U. She studies transatlantic Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment in Spain and New Spain. Her research focuses on literature deemed obscene by the Spanish Inquisition in Spain and the Americas, and more broadly in obscenity, censorship, and freedom of speech. She has published essays and articles on Cervantes, Lope de Vega, and Teresa de Cartagena, among others. She is currently writing a book entitled Pornopoetics: The Poetics of Pornography in Eighteenth Century Europe.

For more information on this and other events, view our annual Literary Events Calendar brochure here: www.washcoll.edu/live/files/7406-2017-2018. For more information on the Literary House, visit www.washcoll.edu/centers/lithouse/.