Wind Ensemble Concert Celebrates Fall

Share

 

Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble in rehearsal

The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble celebrates autumn in its first concert of the season, “Festive Fall.” Music Director Keith Wharton will conduct this free concert, beginning at 4 p.m. on Sunday, October 29, at Emmanuel Episcopal Church at Cross and High streets, Chestertown. The church is handicapped-accessible, via the ramp and automatic doors on the courthouse-green side of the building.

Two works on the program were written in memoriam. “Almost Autumn,” by Gary P. Gilroy, is a loving tribute and celebration in memory of a well-loved, respected, and successful colleague. “In These Last Days of Autumn,” by Randall D. Standridge, was written in memory of a young, aspiring rock musician.

On a lighter note, “Dance of the Trolls,” by Mike Forbes, is a fun and colorful work that depicts the mysterious trolls of Mount Horeb, upon which Moses received the Ten Commandments. “Cut to the Chase” has melodic fragments that dart around the band as if every instrument is being chased or is chasing something.

Beautiful melodies are represented by an arrangement of the jazz standard “Autumn Leaves,” by Joseph Kosma, and by “Highlights from Wicked,” the blockbuster Broadway hit with songs “No One Mourns the Wicked,” “I’m Not That Girl,” “Defying Gravity,” “No Good Deed,” and “For Good.”

“Celebration Overture,” by Darren W. Jenkins, is a musical celebration of life and the wonderful, positive events we experience. At the other end of the spectrum, “Echoes in the Woods” is a piece that reflects the quiet beauty of Wisconsin forest and lakes after the passing of logging camps. In a more dramatic vein, “Music from Carmina Burana,” by Carl Orff, denotes primal forces and the whims of Fortuna, the goddess of luck.

The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble is an all-ages community concert band. It was formed in 2001 to offer area wind and percussion musicians the opportunity to continue or return to the pleasures of playing quality music in a large ensemble. New members are always welcome, without audition or fee.

Rehearsals start promptly at 7 p.m. and run until 8:30 p.m. in the Washington College band room (no. 116) in Gibson Center for the Arts. For further information, call 410-778-2829, send a message to ESWEemail@yahoo.com, or go to facebook.com/EasternShoreWindEnsemble. The ensemble is partially supported by a grant from the Kent County Arts Council.

Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble in Concert May 21

Share

The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble celebrates American music in its final concert of the season, “Red, White, and Blue.” Music Director Dr. Keith A. Wharton will conduct this free band concert, beginning at 4 p.m. on Sunday, May 21, at Emmanuel Episcopal Church at Cross and High streets, Chestertown. The church is handicapped-accessible, via the ramp and automatic doors on the courthouse-green side of the building.

The concert features two works that celebrate the American spirit. “Freedom Quest” by Tracy O. Behrman conveys the essence of American freedom with drive, brilliance, tenderness, and beauty. “Celebrate America” by Robert E. Foster is unabashedly patriotic; its bold fanfare reflects the strength and courage demonstrated by Americans and follows with a musical journey through several patriotic pieces, which include “America, the Beautiful”; “You’re a Grand Old Flag”; and “America” (“My Country, ’Tis of Thee”).

Several works acknowledge the struggle and sacrifice of America’s armed forces. “Civil War Reflections” by Larry MacTaggart uses popular songs from the Civil War era to paint a musical portrait of that turbulent time in our history. “Reflections from the Wall” by David Shaffer was inspired by the Vietnam War Memorial and commemorates the 50th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War. “We Stand On Guard” by Vince Gassi and “For Our Heroes” by Alan Lee Silva pay homage to all American service personnel in times of war and peace.

No concert of American music would be complete without marches, and this concert offers two. “Our Own Red, White, and Blue” by Henry Fillmore was written as a contribution to the World War I war effort and was often played at Red Cross fundraisers. “National Emblem March” by E. E. Bagley is one of the all-time great marches and is known for its brief quote of “The Star-Spangled Banner” and its rousing low-brass trio.

The audience can participate in “The Ultimate Patriotic Sing-Along,” an arrangement by Jerry Brubaker of American music classics: “Battle Hymn of the Republic,” “America the Beautiful,” “You’re a Grand Old Flag,” and “God Bless the U.S.A.”

The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble is an all-ages community concert band. It was formed in 2001 to offer area wind and percussion musicians the opportunity to continue or return to the pleasures of playing quality music in a large ensemble. New members are always welcome, without audition or fee.

Rehearsals for next season will begin in September. The Monday-night rehearsals start promptly at 7:00 p.m. and run until 8:30 p.m. in the Washington College band room (No. 116) in Gibson Center for the Arts.

For further information, call 410-778-2829, send a message to ESWEemail@yahoo.com, or look at facebook.com/EasternShoreWindEnsemble. The ensemble is partially supported by a grant from the Kent County Arts Council.

“Glad Tidings to All” the Theme for Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble’s December Concert

Share

“Glad Tidings to All” is the title of the Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble’s 2016 December concert. Music Director Dr. Keith A. Wharton will conduct a selection of holiday music as well as a new work by Kent County High School senior Glaeden Boyd. The free concert will begin at 4 p.m. Sunday, December 4, at Emmanuel Episcopal Church at the corner of Cross and High streets in Chestertown. The church is handicapped-accessible, via the ramp and automatic doors on the courthouse-green side of the building.

The audience is invited to have refreshments with the band in the parish hall following the concert.

The concert will begin with “Herald the Holidays,” a fanfare and flourish for concert band using familiar carols and holiday melodies. It will be followed by “A Cambridge Carol,” a work based on the joyful, rhythmic Christmas carol that evolved from a 16th-century secular French dance tune.

Next will be the instantly recognizable “The Skaters’ Waltz” that captures the graceful movements of Belle Epoque skaters on an outdoor ice rink in Paris. The more serious work that follows, “Symphonic Prelude on Adeste Fidelis,” begins with an unaccompanied trumpet solo, progresses to a trumpet duet, then full brass choir, woodwind choir and finally the complete band.

Next will be “Joyeux Noel!,” an arrangement of holiday music from France, followed by a recent adaptation of the English carol “Greensleeves” as arranged for the contemporary group Mannheim Steamroller.

The band will then play “Hark to the Fanfare Sounding,” an original work for brass composed by band member Glaeden Boyd.

The next work in the concert will be “A Mad Russian’s Christmas,” an arrangement of a piece composed for the American progressive rock band Trans-Siberian Orchestra that uses Ukrainian folk melodies made famous by Tchaikovsky in “The Nutcracker” ballet.

After “Good Tidings to All,” another medley of familiar carols, the concert will conclude with “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year,” an arrangement of the 1963 Christmas song made famous by Andy Williams.

The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble is an all-ages community concert band. It was formed in 2001 to offer area wind and percussion musicians the opportunity to continue or return to the pleasures of playing quality music in a large ensemble. New members are always welcome, without audition or fee.
Rehearsals for the next concert, on March 19, will begin on January 9. They start promptly at 7:00 p.m. and run until 8:30 p.m. in the Washington College band room in Gibson Center for the Arts. For further information, call 410-810-1834 or 410-778-2829. The ensemble is partially supported by a grant from the Kent County Arts Council.

Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble Seeks New Members

Share

As the start of its 2016-2017 season nears, the Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble (the all-ages community concert band based in Chestertown) invites new members to join the group for its 16th season. The first rehearsal will be on Monday, Sept. 12, starting promptly at 7:00 p.m. and ending by 8:30, in Washington College’s band room (No. 116 in the classroom wing of the Gibson Center for the Arts). Prospective members who can’t attend the first rehearsal should come to a subsequent Monday-evening rehearsal.

ESWE 2016-05-22 3x5 1_09mbWind and percussion instrumentalists with experience on their instruments, whether resuming playing after even a long period away from them or having played continually, are eligible for membership, without fee or audition. There are no limits on section sizes so that all who wish to play may do so. At present the band especially seeks players of these instruments: oboe, bassoon, clarinet (including bass), saxophone (especially tenor), horn, and baritone/euphonium.

Students from advanced middle-schoolers on up, are especially encouraged to join. They generally will find that their skills and musicianship improve faster and farther with the additional playing time and different repertoire from that of their school bands.The band also welcomes students who are experienced on their instruments but do not participate in a school band, either because their class schedules won’t allow it or because their schools have no band or other suitable ensemble.

Community-band membership offers students other benefits also. By the time they graduate from high school, student members seem to value the intergenerational interactions they have had through membership; in some seasons members have ranged from young middle-schoolers to retirees in their 80s even older.Students also realize that participating in ensembles can be a lifetime pursuit, not one that ends after graduation from high school or college. And a significant number of students who participated in the band have gone on to major in music in college and pursue music-related careers.

Dr. Keith A. Wharton, a veteran of more than 30 years as a music teacher in the Kent County Public Schools and also on the music staffs of Washington College and the Upper Chesapeake Summer Center for the Arts, has been the band’s music director from the band’s founding. He has programmed more than 65 concerts for the wind ensemble. Dr. Wharton and the ensemble still maintain their original philosophy of “providing a music group in which the members can expand their skills, play quality music, and enjoy themselves in a supportive, collegial atmosphere as well as entertain audiences.”

The season’s first free concert, one of the musical events of Sultana’s Downrigging Weekend, will be at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 30, at Emmanuel Episcopal Church in downtown Chestertown. The program will consist at least partially of pieces appropriate for the Halloween season (such as “Creepy Classics for Band” and highlights from the Broadway musical “Wicked”).

The next concert will be a Christmas/winter-holiday concert on December 4. After a break, rehearsals will resume in January, with concerts scheduled for March 19 and May 21. All will be at Emmanuel Church, with free admission.

For more information, prospective members may call 410-778-2829 or 410-810-1834. The ensemble is supported by the Kent County Arts Council and community donations.

“Made In America” the Theme for Final Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble May 22

Share

“Made In America” will be the theme for the final Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble concert of the 2015-2016 season. The band concert will present works by American composers of classical, popular, and stage, film and TV music. Washington College student Emma Hoey will be featured as trumpet soloist. The free concert will begin at 4 p.m., Sunday, May 22, at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Cross and High streets, Chestertown. The church is handicapped-accessible at the entrance from the old courthouse green.

The program will open with “Fanfare for the Common Man.” Aaron Copland wrote the piece in 1942 for the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra under conductor Eugene Goossens. It was inspired in part by a famous speech made earlier in the same year where vice president Henry A. Wallace proclaimed the dawning of the “Century of the Common Man.”

“American Riversongs” by Wisconsin composer Pierre La Plante is a moving tribute to an earlier time when waterways were the lifeline of our growing nation. It features “Down The River,” “Shenandoah” (aka “Across The Wide Missouri”), “The Glendy Burk,” and a delightful Creole dance tune based on the music for the bamboula, a drum made from a section of giant bamboo with skin stretched over the ends.

“Love’s Old Sweet Song,” words by G. Clifton Bingham and music by James Lyman Molloy, was an immensely popular Victorian-era parlor song. Melodic and sentimental, it was often played and sung in homes around the increasingly common upright piano or parlor organ of that period. During the great American concert band era of a century ago, virtuoso brass soloists often played it as an encore, and in that spirit this arrangement by Andrew Glover is programmed as a trumpet solo with band accompaniment.

“A Gershwin Tribute to Love” is an arrangement by Brent Heisinger of lovely melodies that George Gershwin wrote for stage and screen. “’S Wonderful” is from the 1927 Broadway musical “Funny Face,” “Love is Here to Stay” from the 1938 film “The Goldwyn Follies,” “They Can’t Take That Away from Me” from the 1937 Fred Astaire movie “Shall We Dance,” and “Embraceable You” from the 1930 Broadway musical “Girl Crazy.”

“The Golden Age of Broadway” is arranger John Moss’s nod to the fabulous show music of Richard Rodgers from the 1940s and 1950s. It features “Bali Ha’i” from the 1949 show “South Pacific,” “The Carousel Waltz” from 1945’s “Carousel,” “Getting To Know You” from the 1951 show “The King and I,” “Oklahoma” from the 1943 show of the same name, and “Climb Every Mountain” from the 1959 show “The Sound of Music.”

“Mancini!” is an arrangement by Stephen Bulla of some of Henry Mancini’s most memorable television and film music. It includes the “Pink Panther” theme from the 1964 film of the same name, the “Baby Elephant Theme” from the 1962 John Wayne film “Hatari!,” “Moon River” from the 1961 Audrey Hepburn film “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” and two selections from the 1958-1961 “Peter Gunn” private eye TV show: “Dreamsville” and the “Peter Gunn Theme.”

The program will conclude with “American Barndance,” Richard L. Saucedo’s lively work that contains elements of an early American character. It features a calm and poignant section of light texture with interlaced lyric themes, builds to a dramatic peak, and becomes even more frenzied as it races to an exciting conclusion.

Directed by Dr. Keith Wharton, the Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble is an all-ages community concert band. It was formed in 2001 to offer area wind and percussion musicians the opportunity to continue or return to the pleasures of playing quality music in a large ensemble. New members are always welcome, without audition or fee.

Rehearsals for the next concert, on October 30, will begin in early September. They start promptly at 7:00 p.m. and run until 8:30 p.m. in the Washington College band room in Gibson Center for the Arts. For further information, call 410-778-2829 or 410-810-1834. The ensemble is partially supported by a grant from the Kent County Arts Council.

European Tour: Free Concert by the Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble March 20

Share

The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble’s “European Tour” concert features charming works that paint musical pictures of parts of Europe (and Egypt, across the Mediterranean). This free band concert is at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Cross and High streets, on Sunday, March 20, 2016, at 4 p.m.

The program will open with Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi’s “Grand March” from his 1877 opera “Aida.” Sometimes played today at graduations and weddings, it evokes the grandeur of Egypt.
Next, Italy will be visited, in the light and festive “Italian Polka,” written by Sergei Rachmaninoff after a family trip to Italy in 1906, a contrast to the dark and heavy works for which he is better known. Then the band will play “Capriccio Espagnol,” an 1877 piece by another Russian composer, Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov. His fiery and energetic piece, based on Spanish dance and folk tunes, captures the flavors and rhythms of Spain.

The English countryside and its rural small towns and villages will be evoked by “Covington Square,” by James Swearingen, a contemporary American composer.

Eastern Europe and the characteristic rhythms of Slavic folk music will be represented by “Slavonic Dance No. 8,” written by Czech composer Antonin Dvorak in 1878. It is based on a furiant, a fast and fiery Bohemian dance.

Vienna, Austria, will be visited via Franz von Suppé’s 1844 overture “Morning, Noon and Night in Vienna.” In “One Night in Athens,” contemporary American composer David Bobrowitz captures the joy and excitement of the dance music he heard during a memorable evening at an Athens restaurant.

The program will conclude with a return to Italy via “Italian Holiday,” a medley of well-known and beloved songs and arias from Italy’s popular and operatic traditions. Some inclusions will be “Funiculi, Funicula,” “La Donna è Mobile,” and “O Sole Mio.”

Directed by Dr. Keith Wharton, the Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble is an all-ages community concert band. It was formed in 2001 to offer area wind and percussion musicians the opportunity to continue or return to the pleasures of playing quality music in a large ensemble. New members are always welcome, without audition or fee.

Rehearsals for the next concert, on May 22, will begin on Monday, March 21. They start promptly at 7:00 p.m. and run until 8:30 p.m in the Washington College band room in Gibson Center for the Arts.

For further information, call 410-778-2829. The ensemble is partially supported by a grant from the Kent County Arts Council.

Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble Offers “Mystery and Intrigue” November 1st

Share

The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble’s “Mystery and Intrigue” concert features dramatic works from contemporary composers and operatic composers. This free concert is at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Cross and High streets, on Sunday, November 1, 2015, at 4 p.m.

The contemporary works include Drive! by Patrick Roszell, a brand new work for 2015 that is energetic and fast-paced. Cycle of the Werewolf by Jeremy S. Martin was inspired by the Stephen King short story of the same name. Aria Without Words by Clarence Barber is an exploration of the rich sonority of the concert band. Nemesis by Gary D. Ziek is highly volatile in nature, projecting the powerful and ominous feelings associated with the title.

The operatic works include Intermezzo Sinfonico from “Cavalleria Rusticana” by Pietro Mascagni, featured in countless television commercials and in movies ranging from “Raging Bull” to “Godfather III.” Galop, from “Dance of the Hours” in the opera “La Giocanda” by Amilcare Ponchielli, is familiar even to the non-musical because of its use by Walt Disney, Spike Jones, Allan Sherman, Mel Brooks, “Garfield and Friends” and “The Simpsons.” Intermezzo from “Pagliacci” by Ruggiero Leoncavallo retains the soaring, passionate lines that are the emotional and lyric essence of this expressive work. Selections from “The Pirates of Penzance” by Sir Arthur Sullivan and arranged by John Phillip Sousa perfectly capture the happy-go-lucky spirit of Sullivan’s music and W.S. Gilbert’s brilliant lyrics.

Directed by Dr. Keith A. Wharton, the Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble is an all-ages community concert band. It was formed to offer area wind and percussion musicians an opportunity to continue or return to the pleasures of playing quality music in a large ensemble. New members are always welcome without audition or fee.

For further information, call 410-778-2829. The ensemble is partially supported by the Kent County Arts Council.

Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble (community concert band) free concert – Sunday, Nov. 1, 4 p.m.
Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Cross & High Sts., in downtown Chestertown

Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble Starts New Season

Share

The rehearsal of Monday evening, September 14, marks the start of the 15th season of the Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble, the community concert band based in Chestertown. The ensemble was created in 2001 by a group of community wind- and percussion-instrument players who recognized a need to have not only a local community marching band but also a concert band in which to learn and perform various types of music.

Dr. Keith A. Wharton, a veteran of more than 30 years as a music teacher in the Kent County Public Schools and also on the music staff of Washington College, has been the band’s music director from the beginning. He has programmed more than 60 concerts for the wind ensemble, and some of the founding members have performed in all or nearly all of them. The ensemble and Dr. Wharton still maintain their original philosophy of “providing a music group in which the members can expand their skills, play quality music, and enjoy themselves in a supportive, collegial atmosphere as well as entertain audiences.”

The band’s first free concert, one of the musical events of Schooner Sultana’s Downrigging Weekend, will be at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, November 1, at Emmanuel Episcopal Church in downtown Chestertown. The program will be a combination of pieces oriented towards Halloween (such as the ominous contemporary piece “Nemesis” and “Cycle of the Werewolf,” the latter inspired by the Stephen King story of the same name) and pieces of a more operatic nature (such as “Intermezzo” from Pagliacci, selections from The Pirates of Penzance, and C. Barber’s “Aria Without Words”).

The next concert will be a Christmas/winter-holiday concert on December 6. Concerts during the second half of the season will be on March 20 and May 22. All will be at Emmanuel Church, with free admission. The ensemble is partially supported by the Kent County Arts Council and by community donations.

The band welcomes new members at any time, without audition or fee, but the start of a new season is an especially good time to join. Since its founding, the band has rehearsed at Kent County Middle School, but starting this season rehearsals will be on most Monday evenings in the band room at Washington College (No. 116 in the Gibson Center for the Arts). Rehearsals begin promptly at 7:00 p.m. and end promptly at 8:30.

Members range from advanced middle-school instrumentalists to retirees, some of whom have returned to playing their instruments after years away from them. Members have a variety of musical and vocational backgrounds and experiences but have a very consistent record of attendance, a testament to their dedication and enjoyment. For further information or to join, prospective members may call 410-778-2829 or 410-810-1834. Or to simply join, they should just arrive at the first rehearsal somewhat before 7:00.

Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble’s “Only in America” Set for May 17

Share

The Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble’s “Only in America” concert highlights the success of American icons such as Rodgers and Hammerstein, Leroy Anderson, and Clare Grundman. The concert also will pay musical homage to those willing to take a stand for what they believe and the values they hold dear. This free concert is at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Cross and High streets, on Sunday, May 17, 2015, at 4 p.m. The program will feature Jodi Bortz as flute soloist and trio trumpeters Ray Diedrichs, Joe Diamond, and Chris Harrison. It will conclude with a salute to our armed forces.

Screen Shot 2015-05-05 at 6.54.32 AMHighlights from “The Sound of Music” by Rodgers and Hammerstein incorporates favorite melodies from the final musical written by the legendary composer and lyricist duo.

“Third Army March” by Gregorio A. Diaz has a fascinating history. Diaz wrote this work in 1945 and dedicated it “to Lt. Gen. George S. Patton Jr. and the gallant officers and men of the Third U.S. Army.” But over time it disappeared from the Army repertoire until, 67 years later in June 2012, a former member of The United States Army Band, “Pershing’s Own,” visited Shaw Air Force Base in South Carolina and discovered the march’s score in a display case. He mounted a campaign to restore the historic work, and the Army Concert Band recorded it for the first time in November 2013.

“Smokey Mountain Rhapsody” by Ed Huckeby was composed in traditional fast-slow-fast form. This energetic work’s sections are tuneful and memorable.

“Variations and Theme for Solo Flute and Concert Band” by Anne McGinty has a solo flute part that displays a variety of styles from beautifully expressive lyric lines to spirited faster passages, all supported wonderfully by the full ensemble.

“Fidelity March” by Karl L. King has two strains of sprightly two-beats-per-measure music followed by an extended trio. To add interest, King wrote the trio in a different musical key.
“Bugler’s Holiday” by Leroy Anderson is, in all probability, the most famous trumpet trio ever written and is both a performer and audience favorite. It features bugle-call rhythms that are braided by the trio of trumpets into a bouncy homage to the bugle.

“The Blue and the Gray” by Clare Grundman offers settings of famous Civil War songs, including “Kingdom Coming,” “Marching Through Georgia,” “The Yellow Rose Of Texas,” “Battle Cry Of Freedom,” “Battle Hymn Of The Republic,” and others. The treatment of these well-known melodies effectively portrays the emotions of a divided nation.

“Armed Forces – The Pride of America!” is the definitive patriotic armed forces tribute. It features songs of all five branches of the Armed Forces and makes excellent use of parts of Sousa marches as interludes.

Directed by Dr. Keith Wharton, the Eastern Shore Wind Ensemble is an all-ages community concert band. It was formed to offer area wind and percussion musicians an opportunity to continue or return to the pleasures of playing quality music in a large ensemble. New members are always welcome without audition or fee. For further information, call 410-778-2829 or 410-810-1834. The ensemble is partially supported by the Kent County Arts Council.