Chesapeake College Announce President Barbara Viniar’s Departure; Former President Stuart Bounds to Become Interim

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The Chesapeake College Board of Trustees has announced that Dr. Barbara Viniar’s term as President of the College will conclude on July 1, 2017. The Trustees appreciate Dr. Viniar’s efforts on behalf of the College over the past nine years and wish her well in her future endeavors.

Dr. Stuart Bounds has been appointed Interim President of the College effective July 1, 2017. Dr. Bounds retired from the College in 2008 after 11 years as president. Since retiring as President, Dr. Bounds has remained active in the community college field, both as a consultant and as an adjunct professor of political science at Chesapeake. The Board is delighted that Dr. Bounds has agreed to return to the College in this interim role and believes that his executive experience at Chesapeake and deep understanding of the Mid-Shore community will be a great asset to the College and to the Board during the transition period.

The search for a new president of the College will commence this summer. The Board will engage and consult with the College community, the College’s five supporting counties and other key stakeholders in the development of a plan for the search, and in the evaluation and selection of the sixth president of Chesapeake College.

Chesapeake College has provided 50 years of outstanding service to the Mid-Shore community and the Board is committed to finding an exceptional community college leader to guide the College into the future. With that leadership and the extraordinary talent and resources within the College and throughout the community, the College’s role as the primary provider of higher education and workforce training in the region will continue to expand and, thereby help to ensure a bright future for the Mid-Shore.

Op-Ed: Even Individuals Can Help Save the Bay

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As someone who grew up in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, President Trump’s proposed budget cuts to the United States Environmental Protection Agency deeply concern me. Revoking the Bay’s federal funds would not only undermine years of progress, but would devastate communities within the watershed as well.

The Chesapeake Bay watershed is home to nearly 20 million people across six states and Washington, D.C. The beloved Maryland blue crab and Virginia oyster support thriving fisheries thanks to the efforts that have been made to clean the Bay over the past decades. The Chesapeake Bay supports precious ecosystems, a thriving economy, and a way of life. Anyone who grew up on the coast knows what it’s like to meet up with old friends at a local oyster roast or to crack into the first “Jimmy” of the season. Unfortunately, with the proposed budget cuts, this way of life may become a luxury of the past.

One of the major problems contributing to the Chesapeake Bay’s health is runoff from farms, gardens, and lawns. Runoff includes excess sediments, nutrients, and chemicals that otherwise would not be introduced to the Bay. For clarification, I’m not blaming anyone in particular or suggesting that we more heavily regulate the sources of runoff to the Bay. As the granddaughter of a farmer and a resident of a small town in rural Virginia, I will always support the men and women who devote their lives to serving their community through farming. What I am suggesting is that each resident of the Chesapeake Bay watershed take it upon themselves to help alleviate the problem of runoff to the Bay.

But what can you, an individual, do to help “Save the Bay”? The answer is probably easier than you think and it’s something you can do in your own back yard (and front yard too!). Better management of your soil, yes—dirt, can make an impact on the Bay’s health. If everyone took it upon themselves to better manage their lawns and gardens, and even farms, we could make a big impact. Individuals can make a positive change in the Bay through conservation tillage, reduced or more targeted use of fertilizers and pesticides, and managing plant species to help reduce runoff.

Well managed soil can help reduce runoff by absorbing rainfall like a sponge. There is less pore space to “soak up” the water when soil is compacted. However, when the soil is rich with plant material and open pores, rain can infiltrate the ground and runoff is reduced. Another soil management approach is to never leave a field or a garden fallow. Empty fields expose the soil to erosion from wind and rain, which eventually enters the Chesapeake Bay. To reduce your input of sediments and other pollutants, make sure to plant cover crops for all seasons. A simple, but important soil management method, is to only fertilize your soil if absolutely needed. Cutting down on fertilizer application will help alleviate the input of nutrients to the Bay. A potential alternative to fertilizers is making your own compost.

When people across the entire watershed implement these management practices there can be great cumulative effects on the Chesapeake Bay’s health and prosperity. Better yet, individual action will not only help the Bay, but can help sustain a way of life.

Morgan Rudd is first year graduate student at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment.

Recovery: Retreat House at Hillsboro Plans Spring Programs on AA and Meditation

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The Retreat House at Hillsboro is hosting several events that are open to the public throughout the spring.

On Saturday, April 22, a half-day retreat, “Recovering Spirit: Fulfilling our Authentic Selves” will be held from 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. This is the third retreat led by the Reverend Paul Gennett, Jr. and it will focus on the gift of living into a fulfilled recovering life through AA’s Steps 8-12. The session includes discussion and time for meditation. A light breakfast and lunch is provided. There is no charge for the retreat but a suggested donation of $25 would be gratefully accepted to cover expenses. Register at https://recoveringspirit3.eventbrite.com.

Francie Thayer, Director, Retreat House at Hillsboro will lead weekly half-hour meditation classes.

Beginning on Saturday May 6, the Rev. Marianne Ell will be leading worship services at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Hillsboro MD. The service will begin at 5:30 PM. Rev. Ell is the most recent Rector at St. Paul’s, ending her time there in 1996. Her recent return to the area and love of the community and church have drawn her to this offering. Assisting her will be the Rev. Rachel Field, current assistant Director of the Retreat House at Hillsboro MD. All are welcome.

Weekly meditation classes will begin on Monday, May 8 at 5:45 p.m. These classes are designed for people who are challenged to make time for a meditation practice and for those who aren’t sure how to get a practice started. The 30-minute session, led by Retreat House spiritual director Francie Thayer, will include guidance for beginners. A peaceful space and pillows will also be provided. To sign up, send an email to info@retreathousehillsboro.org or call (410) 364-7042.

On Saturday, June 3, the Retreat House grounds will be open for a Neighborhood Barbecue from 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Drinks, desserts, condiments and paper goods will be provided and grills will be set up. Guests are asked to bring meats and side dishes to share as well as blankets and lawn chairs. Some seating will be available. RSVP by Monday, May 29 to info@retreathousehillsboro.org or call (410) 364-7042.

Located on the grounds of St. Paul’s Church at 22005 Church Street, Hillsboro, Maryland, the Retreat House is open for group retreats and meetings, individual hermitages, meditation and any who seek a spiritual connection. A traditional Chartres-style walking labyrinth is always open for walking and prayer. The Retreat House at Hillsboro is a ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Easton, MD. For more information contact Francie Thayer, Director, at (410) 364-7042, info@retreathouse.org, or visit us on Facebook.com/RetreatHouseAtHillsboro.

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Photo caption: Francie Thayer, Director, Retreat House at Hillsboro will lead weekly half-hour meditation classes.

Terry Wolf Art at Heron Point in May

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The paintings of local well-known artist Terry Wolf will be featured at Heron Point during the month of May. Wolf works in many mediums but says “watercolor, pastels, egg tempera and water gilding are most suited to express my ideas.” He paints in Maine and Maryland and has studied with John Dehlinger and Henry Peacock. He also studied “The Art in Painting” at the Barnes Foundation for three years. He will return to the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania this spring and summer to demonstrate egg tempera painting in celebration of Andrew Wyeth’s 100th birthday celebration.

The paintings may be viewed daily from 10am until 5pm. A reception honoring Terry Wolf and his work will be held at Heron Point, 501 E. Campus Avenue on Saturday, May 6th, from 2 until 4pm. All are welcome.

United Way Celebrates Volunteers at Heron Point

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Bottom row L-R: Bonnie Keating, David Keating, Bobbie Chase, Nancy Montague, Betsy McCown, Jennifer Kafka Smith, Judy Kneller, John Leek, Charlotte Hawes, Ginny Barker Second Row L-R: Jane Jewell, Charlotte Potts, Denise Tontarski, Meredith Rellick Third Row: Ed Silver (UWKC Board), Jennifer Tosten, Tamara Kim, Ken Young Top Row: Lee Irish, Chuck Shorley, Ralph Dowling, Andy Andrews, and Comm. Bill Short

April 6, 2017 was the Annual Meeting and Volunteer Recognition Breakfast of the United Way of Kent County held at Heron Point in Chestertown. A delicious buffet breakfast was served in Heron Point’s newly refurbished dining facility with nearly ninety people in attendance. As attendees enjoyed their coffee, a short business meeting was held before Volunteers of United Way Member Agencies from all over Kent County were honored.

President Carol Droge welcomed guests, and spoke about successes of United Way in the past year. She mentioned the update of the areas of impact: Education, Health, and Financial Stability. Ms. Droge stated that this year’s campaign, United Way of Kent’s 60th, was at 83% of its goal of $210,000. She mentioned the upcoming Guest Chef Fundraiser Dinner to be held at the Lemon Leaf Café on April 11.

Treasurer Alison Libshitz introduced the first Annual Report of United Way of Kent County. Everyone present received a copy.

Bottom Row L-R: Chip Williams (VP), Patti Dowling, Mary Fisher, Lauren Gibson Second Row: Beth Everett (ED), Alison Libshitz (T), Carol Droge Third Row: Barbara Foster, Glenn Wilson (P), Katie Warrington Top Row: Bill MacIntosh, Bob Greenwald Missing: Sarah Feyerherm, Marilyn Parks (S), Ed Silver

Directors and Officers were elected. For the coming year, officers will be: Glenn Wilson, President; Chip Williams, Vice President; Marilyn Parks, Secretary, and Alison Libshitz, Treasurer. Directors elected for a three year term are Patti Dowling, Carol Droge, Mary Fisher, Lauren Gibson, Bill MacIntosh, and Ed Silver.

The Business Partner of the year, The Peoples Bank, was introduced and presented with a plaque noting their service to the community in the past year. Mr. Ralph Dowling, President and CEO, accepted the plaque and said that community service is an important function of a community bank like Peoples Bank.

Next, volunteers from 24 Kent County Member Agencies were introduced and given a stadium blanket with the United Way 60th Anniversary logo on it and a certificate from Governor Larry Hogan thanking them for their service.

Volunteers recognized were: American Red Cross, Lisa Sewell; Big Brothers Big Sisters, Nancy Gray; Boy Scouts, Ken Young; Camp Fairlee/Easterseals, Bill Short; Character Counts, Rebecca Pitre; Community Food Pantry, Judy Kneller; Community Mediation Upper Shore, Andy Andrews; Echo Hill Outdoor School, Sally Harding; For All Seasons, Ginny Barker; Fiddlesticks! Youth Orchestra, Jane Jewell; Girl Scouts, Tamara Kim; Good Neighbor Fund, Bobbie Chase; Horizons of Kent and Queen Anne’s, Jennifer Tosten; Kent Association of Riding Therapy, Kirsten Forney; Kent County Community Assistance Fund, Charlotte Potts; Kent County Medical Adult Day Care Foundation, Pets on Wheels; Kent Forward, Gina Jachimowicz; Mid-Shore Council on Family Violence, Meredith Rellick; Playmakers Camp at the Garfield Center, Jennifer Kafka Smith; Rebuilding Together, John Leek; Rock hall Yacht Club Sailing School Scholarship Program, Denise Tontarski; St. Martin’s Ministries, Charlotte Hawes; Samaritan Group, Inc., Bonnie and David Keating; and United Needs and Abilities, Chuck Shorley.

Townsend Memorial Medical Clinic did not name a Volunteer this year.

Incoming President Glenn Wilson congratulated all the honorees. He spoke about the goals of United Way for the coming year, chiefly, to do a comprehensive Community Needs Assessment for Kent County. Mr. Wilson also recognized Josh Petersen, President and CEO of 211 Maryland, Inc. and noted United Way’s intention to work with 211 to expand Member Agencies’ availability to the community. He recognized outgoing President Droge’s contributions to United Way and Kent County and presented her with a Distinguished Service Award.

For more information about United Way of Kent County, its mission, and volunteering opportunities, call 410-778-3195 or email unitedwaykc@verizon.net.

Shore Progressives Prepare to Address Health Care, Other Issues At Harris Town Hall

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Members of Eastern Shore progressive organizations, along with thousands of non-partisan progressive citizens groups formed to oppose the Trump agenda, are relieved that the Affordable Care Act has so far survived Republican attempts to repeal it.

“The persistent and strong national grassroots activism of these groups played a major role in the ultimate failure of the Republicans to bring a replacement bill up for a vote,” said Emily Jackson, co-leader of Together We Will – Delmarva.

Acknowledging that the ACA can be improved, many members of Talbot Rising are proponents of a single-payer system. “If 35 of the world’s developed nations can provide healthcare to all their citizens as a right, not a privilege based on income, we can do it here too,” said Denice Lombard, a member of Talbot Rising and the Talbot County Democratic Women’s Club. “A single-payer system fixes all the problems of healthcare we face. It’s high quality, affordable and accessible.”

Lombard dismissed the notion that individuals and states should pick and choose what kind of healthcare they need. “All of our bodies need healthcare at different times in our lives,” she said. “None of us has a crystal ball to see what our health care needs will be, and all of these arguments twist our society into a giant pretzel that ultimately protects the rights of for-profit insurance companies over people.”

Although many constituents had planned to press 1st District Rep. Andy Harris on the Republican healthcare bill at his town hall, scheduled for Friday, March 31, at 6 p.m. at Chesapeake College’s Todd Performing Arts Center, turnout is expected to be strong even though GOP leadership failed to muster enough votes to pass the bill last week.

“We have plenty of other issues to discuss with our congressman,” said Talbot Rising founder Michael Pullen. “We want Andy Harris to represent our interests, but when he co-sponsors a bill to undermine public education, one to withhold federal funds from communities that want to protect immigrants from deportation and provide sanctuary for them, and when he comes out in support of destroying the EPA, people can’t just stand by and let that happen without a fight,” said Pullen. “While Trump proposes to add $54 billion of our tax dollars to the defense budget while taking money away from the needs of the American people and the environment, we have no choice but to protest.”

Dorotheann S. Sadusky, president of the Democratic Club of Queen Anne’s County also weighed in. “As a member of the Labor, Health & Human Services Committee, Congressman Harris must tell us if he intends to support Trump’s budget that calls for elimination of such agencies as the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Inter-American Foundation and the Chemical Safety Board to name a few.”

Harris set aside only one hour for the town hall in a venue that holds 1,000 people. Several regional progressive organizations have requested that Harris extend the length of the meeting and have vowed to continue the town hall outside with or without the congressman. “We will be heard one way or the other, rain or shine,” said Debbie Krueger, co-leader, of Together We Will – Delmarva.

Op-Ed: A Chesapeake Bay Commentary by Philip Hoon

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I am an avid reader of the Washington Post but with all due respect take exception to the fatalistic sub-headline of its March 22 editorial that “The last, best hope to revive the estuary is now imperiled by the Trump administration.”

It is, of course, most unfortunate that the Trump administration has proposed a termination of Chesapeake Bay restoration funding.

But while there is good reason to contest that proposal as it makes its way through the Congressional budget process, the reality is that there are likely to be some, perhaps very significant, cuts to that funding. So now is the time to rise to the occasion. . . and begin to prepare for the stark reality ahead.

To that end, it seems appropriate to me that perhaps now is the time for private sector organizations and initiatives in the primary states in the Chesapeake Bay watershed – Maryland & Virginia – to collaborate in a common mission, and free of a organizational ego, with those in the secondary states – Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia & Delaware– in trying to work with state governments to accomplish the shared regional goal of a clean and healthy Bay.

In other words, let’s not cry in our beer. After all, remember the challenges of The Greatest Generation and how it responded to the challenges of the times. . .

I am not a scientist, but from all that has been published, it does not seem that more study of the problems of the Bay is needed. It is clear that excess nitrogen, phosphorous and siltation are the primary culprits. So let’s get to work.

I believe that I read that annual Federal funding for the Chesapeake Bay is currently $105 million. While that is not an insignificant amount, perhaps it should be put in perspective.

The US Geological Survey estimates that 18 million people live in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Therefore, the per capita cost of replacing that $105 million Federal Government funding is $5.83 per person per year . . . that is less than 2¢/day.

And while we are at it, there is a view of many that the millions of Federal dollars spent over the past several decades have been ineffectively applied to accomplish the Bay restoration goal. After all, many of its tributaries are impaired so it is a bit disingenuous to assert that the Bay is really improving as it should be.

Another interesting idea might be to request Washington to designate the Chesapeake Bay as a national park so that it would receive the protections and assistance that such a special status would afford. I am not sure of all the implications of that, and do not know whether the Trump administration has proposed budget cuts to our great national parks. But all in all, I would think that the Chesapeake Bay might qualify to be one of the first new national parks in the 21st Century.

At times like this, I think that “out of the box thinking” is needed. So while these ideas might not be viable, the reality may be that something like them needs to be pursued if our cherished Chesapeake Bay is to be preserved.

So let’s roll up our sleeves and do what the Washington bureaucrats have not been able to do. After all, we who live in its watershed are the ones who have the greatest opportunity to enjoy the mighty Chesapeake Bay.

We are that “last best hope” for the Chesapeake Bay, and there is work to be done.

Philip Hoon is a private attorney in Chestertown, Maryland.

Letter to Editor: Local Groups Seek Answers from Congressman Harris March 31

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This is an open letter from a number of constituent groups, all of whom share significant concerns about the many vital issues we face and the wholly inadequate amount of time you have allotted to the Town Hall on March 31. One hour doesn’t provide a fair chance to discuss our concerns and hear your views. We are concerned about these major items, among others:

Repeal of the Affordable Care Act and replacement with a bill that will cost Maryland $2 Billion annually, substantially increase those who are uninsured and increase the cost of health care. These are just a few of the many groups that oppose the current bill:
American Medical Association – “the replacement bill, as written, would reverse the coverage gains achieved under the ACA, causing many Americans to lose the health care coverage they have come to depend upon.”

American Hospital Association & Federation of American Hospitals: “As lawmakers work to re-examine this law, patients and the caregivers who serve them across America are depending on Congress to make continued coverage a priority. We believe that any changes to the ACA must be guided by ensuring that we continue to provide health care coverage for the tens of millions of Americans who have benefitted from the law. We are pleased that so many in Congress also recognize the need to preserve patient coverage.”

AARP “…opposes this legislation, as introduced, that would weaken Medicare, leaving the door open to a voucher program that shifts costs and risks to seniors.”
American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network “ACS CAN has long advocated that any changes to the health care law should provide equal or better coverage for cancer prevention, treatment and follow-up care than what is currently available. These bills have the potential to significantly alter the affordability, availability and quality of health insurance available to cancer patients and survivors. Changing the income-based subsidy to a flat tax credit, combined with reducing the standards for quality insurance could return cancer patients to a world where many are unable to afford meaningful insurance or are left to buy coverage that doesn’t meet their health needs.”

“In 2015, approximately 1.5 million people with a history of cancer between 18-64 years old relied on Medicaid for their insurance. Nearly one-third of childhood cancer patients are insured through Medicaid at the time of diagnosis. The proposed repeal of Medicaid expansion along with significant federal funding changes could leave the nation’s lowest income cancer patients without access to preventive, c”rative and follow-up health care.”

National Partnership Women and Families: “House Republicans’ Affordable Care Act repeal bill would wreak havoc on our health care system by making health coverage more expensive and inadequate for millions of women and families. The shroud of secrecy surrounding the Republicans’ process and their attempt to sneak through a bill that would have such a devastating impact, without allowing anyone to review it, is shameful.”

“Now that the bill has been revealed, it is clear why Republicans didn’t want people to see it. Their proposal radically overhauls and cuts Medicaid while simultaneously gutting the ACA by repealing financial assistance for low-income families and making it harder for people to afford coverage. It also defunds Planned Parenthood from the Medicaid program, denying 2.5 million people access to essential health care.”

“Moreover, the Republican bill interferes with women’s ability to make health care decisions by making abortion coverage inaccessible. It would harshen and expand already harmful abortion coverage restrictions, denying women the ability to access the care they need.”

Over 50 organizations oppose the proposed healthcare plan that will make Americans will pay more for less. The list includes nurses, doctors, hospitals, teachers, churches, and more. You can see a few here:

https://cooper.house.gov/groups-opposing-republican-health-plan

Why did you co-sponsor H.R. 610 to take funding away from public education through vouchers, repeal the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 and limit the authority of the Department of Education (ED) to award block grants to qualified states. Why did you, as a physician, co-sponsor a Bill that repeals nutrition standards for national school lunch and breakfast programs? Why repeal standards that require schools to increase the availability of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or fat free milk in school meals, reduce the levels of sodium, saturated fat, and trans fat and meet children’s nutritional needs? Whose side are you on?

https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/610

H.R.861 – a bill to terminate the Environmental Protection Agency. Your constituents are entitled to know where you stand on efforts to eliminate environmental protection of the Chesapeake Bay, its rivers, steams, and farmlands. Whose side are you on?

This is just a partial list of our concerns. If you have a genuine interest in listening to your constituents, we demand you allot at least 3 hours to the Town Hall to hear our concerns and explain your views.

We have sent copies of this letter to news organizations throughout the 1st District and expect your early and positive response.

Thank you.

Talbot Rising
Michael Pullen

Together We Will, Delmarva
Emily Jackson
Deborah Collins Krueger
Michele Copper

Together We Will, Harford County
DeLane Lewis

Easton Huddle
Naomi M. Hyman

Kent and Queen Anne’s County Indivisible
Erin Anderson
Kitty Maynard

Talbot County Democratic Women’s’ Club
Lesley Israel

The Eastern Shore PAC for Social And Economic Justice
Meredith Girard
Michele Drostin
Lauren Harton

Kent County Democratic Central Committee
Pamela White

Md. 1st Dist. Indivisible,
New Harford Dem. Club
Allison Galbraith

Md 1st Dist. Indivisible
Baltimore County
Kirk Fairfield

African American Democrats
of Maryland
James A. Sweeting, III, Esq.

Dorchester Indivisible
Mike Brown

Indivisible Worcester Maryland
Susan Buyer, Toby Perkins

Maryland 1st Congressional District Resistance
Joseph Riedel

Bipartisan Alliance for Democracy, Eastern Shore
Maureen Johnston

Queen Anne’s Co. Dem. Central Committee
Elaine Mcneil

Indivisible, Harford County
Irene Whalen

Wicomico County Progressive Caucus
Michael A. Feldman

UMBC Progressives

Mid-Shore Political Organizations Ask Andy Harris to Expand Town Meeting Beyond One Hour

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Numerous 1st District constituent organizations are demanding that Rep. Harris extend the Town Hall scheduled for March 31 beyond one hour. The Town Hall is scheduled from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. on Friday, March 31, at the Todd Performing Arts Center at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills.

“It is clear that one hour will not begin to give Harris’ constituents the opportunity to ask questions and voice their concerns,” said Mike Pullen, a leading member of Talbot Rising, a group of concerned citizens from the Mid-Shore area. “So many of us on the Eastern Shore are worried about how congressional actions will affect us and feel that Rep. Harris has not represented our interests well.”

“His constituents deserve answers and a fair chance to voice their concerns,”Emily Jackson, from Together We Will – Delmarva, says. “Regardless of whether we voted for him or not, as constituents of his district it is important to feel that he is serving our best interests, and how is that
possible if he only allows interactions with him in such limited capacities as his very moderated
conference calls, and this constricted town hall?”

James Sweeting, of the African American Democratic Club of Maryland, weighed in as well. “Harris has co-sponsored or supported bills that many people oppose such as HR 610, which takes funding away from elementary and high schools, eliminates nutritional standards for school children, and virtually eliminates special education programs. Rep. Harris is cosponsoring HR 637 which amends the Clean Air Act to allow dangerous polluting chemicals to be released into our environment. These are important issues that need to be fully and openly discussed. Rep. Harris owes his constituents a fair chance to do
that.”

Another burning issue Harris’ constituents want to discuss with him is healthcare. The Affordable Care Act expanded coverage to millions of Marylanders, reducing its uninsured rate by a third, and its repeal will cost Maryland $2 billion per year. The State will be forced to raise that money or eliminate healthcare delivery services. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that approximately 18 million people will lose coverage next year and that those numbers will increase over time. “If Congress passes the bill before it, which includes eliminating Planned Parenthood, where will women on Medicaid receive healthcare and birth control?” asks Joyce Scharch, President of the Talbot County Democratic Women’s Club. “Whatever form it takes, we want assurance from Harris that he will fight for his constituents to have affordable access to the healthcare they need.”

The American Medical Association, American Hospital Association, AARP, and many other organizations are openly opposing adoption of the current bill before Congress.

“Congressman Harris has consistently overlooked the Eastern Shore and his constituents in terms of economic development, infrastructure improvements, failing to provide for adequate healthcare and now as part of the Trump team he states he will prioritize funding for Chesapeake Bay’s cleanup knowing the EPA’s budget is being slashed,” said Dorotheann S. Sadusky, President of the Democratic Club of Queen Anne’s County.

Attendees plan to gather outside afterwards to raise further questions for the congressman if the town hall is not extended. “People have questions and concerns, and they need a forum in which to voice them. If the Congressman isn’t going to give them that, they’re going to find their own space in which to do it,” Jackson said.

This release was distributed by the following organizations: Talbot Rising Together We Will – Delmarva Democratic Club of Queen Anne’s County Talbot County Democratic Women’s Club African American Democratic Club of Maryland