Mid-Shore Education: Kent School and Neuroscience in the Classroom

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It’s hard to say that neuroscience is new these days. Over the last twenty years, there has been a breathtaking surge in neuroscience research which has radically changed the fields of neurosurgery, psychiatry, pain management, audiology, and countless other disciplines across a wide range of areas.

And so it may not be surprising that this study of neurons and nervous system functions would eventually find its way into the American classroom, but the Spy nonetheless found it remarkable that one institution that was a pioneer in this field would turn out to be the Kent School in Chestertown.

Last year, Kent’s head of school, Nancy Mugele, a strong advocate for using neuroscience techniques in primary education, sought out a three-year partnership with the Center for Transformative Teaching and Learning in Bethesda to apply mind and brain research to the pre-K-8 grade school’s curriculum and teacher training. By doing so, Kent became one of only seven schools in the entire country to participate in a program designed to maximize teacher effectiveness and stimulate students to achieve their highest potential.

The Spy was interested enough in this bold move to seek out Michelle Duke, Kent School’s Assistant Head for Academics, to explain what this means for both educators and students alike in this new and perhaps final frontier in how human beings learn.

This video is approximately four minutes in length. For more information about the Kent School please go here

About Dave Wheelan

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Letters to Editor

  1. I applaud the Kent School for taking on the recent advances in neuroscience, for giving them to the teachers and the students to use, and for applying them in the classroom. This method will give the students hope and create enthusiasm among the teachers. It is forward-looking, radical and courageous of the Kent School to take this on.

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