Job Shadowing Shows Pathways for Kent County STEM Students

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Kent County sophomores recently got a taste of real world occupations when they visited a variety of local businesses that employ professionals in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Each year, eight leading Kent County businesses open their doors and share their expertise with local STEM students as they begin to make plans for the future.

Chesapeake Architects President, Peter Newlin, explains the importance of discussing personal preferences, lifestyle considerations and functional priorities with each client before beginning the design process.

In order to chart realistic and rewarding career paths, students need a clear understanding of the day-to-day roles and responsibilities of the professions they are considering. That’s where the annual job showing program comes in, by introducing students to a variety of experienced professionals who each describe the daily demands and routines of his or her particular occupation. They also discuss the educational requirements needed, specialty areas within each field, and long-term trends that might affect future job opportunities. The program is a timely resource for students as they begin considering secondary education and the courses they will need.

Students witness an amazing display of power and poise exhibited by a massive robot that was recently purchased by Dixon Valve & Coupling to handle inventory demands.

Kent County STEM students, their parents and teachers are thankful for the businesses and professionals who share their time and resources to make the program a success. Participating businesses included Benchworks, Chesapeake Architects, Chesapeake CNC, Dixon Valve & Coupling, DMS & Associates, Eastman Specialty Corp., University of Maryland Extension and University of Maryland Shore Medical Center.


Civil engineer and partner in DMS and Associates, Kevin Shearon, points out the logistical considerations that had to be addressed prior to the construction of Washington College’s new academic building.

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